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7 Tips To Good Body Language For Interviews
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7 Tips To Good Body Language For Interviews

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  • 1. 7 Tips to Good Body Language for Interviews
    Presentation by: Candice HallTips from Forbes.com
  • 2. #1
    The moment you walk into the office, you are immediately being judged. Make sure that you walk in with confidence. Keep your posture in check and be ready to give a good, strong handshake to anyone you meet.
  • 3. #2
    Eye contact is key. Make sure to keep eye contact with the person interviewing you. If multiple people are in the room, look around the room at the other people and then direct your attention back at the person that asked the question. Eye contact shows that you are confident and prepared. Be remember not to stare!
  • 4. #3
    Relax. Everyone knows how nerve-racking an interview is. Sit in a relaxed, but not sloppy, manner to show that you are confident.
  • 5. #4
    Point your feet and knees toward the interviewer. This shows them that you are engaged and interested in what they are saying. Facing your feet toward the door can tell interviewers that you are uninterested and ready to leave.
  • 6. #5
    DON’T FIDGET! Whatever you do, don’t play with your hair, click a pen or wiggle your hands and feet during an interview. Fidgeting tells the interviewer that you uncomfortable and not confident.
  • 7. #6
    Using engaging gestures, like pressing your fingertips together to form a steeple, can be helpful in showing the interviewer that you are engaged in the conversation and interested in what’s being said. Hand gestures should be used to enhance what is being said but don’t overuse them.
  • 8. #7
    Don’t get too comfortable. Leaning back in your chair may suggest that you are overly confident. Lean forward in your chair at key points in the interview to show your interest. Leaning forward too often could be kind of scary but doing it at just the right times in an interview can really make a difference.