Chapter 12

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Chapter 12

  1. 1. Chapter 12<br />Dramatic Play and Creative Dramatics<br />
  2. 2. Overview<br />Play is the natural language of children<br />Toddlers love pretend <br />They demonstrate object hunger<br />Dramatic play is the most valuable form of children’s play<br />Play ideas emanate from children’s experience<br />
  3. 3. Definitions<br />Fantasy element of dramatic play serves many purposes<br />Dramatic play<br />Spontaneous play that can be expanded or repeated over and over just for the fun of it<br />Creative dramatics<br />The improvised drama of children<br />Pantomime<br />The art of conveying ideas without words<br />Sociodramatic play<br />The highest level of symbolic play<br />
  4. 4. Developmental Stages of Dramatic Play<br />Piaget—play in terms of cognitive development<br />Practice play<br />Symbolic play<br />Games with rules<br />Smilansky—four types of sociodramatic play<br />Functional play<br />Constructive play<br />Dramatic play<br />Games with rules<br />
  5. 5. Developmental Stages of Dramatic Play(continued)<br />Maxim—play in two dimensions<br />Social dimension<br />Content dimension<br />
  6. 6. Understanding of Fantasy and Reality in Young Children<br />Dramatic play helps children separate what is make-believe from what is real<br />The younger the child, the more play is rooted in fantasy<br />By age five, children start to differentiate when they are pretending and when they are in the real world<br />Encourage use of language to help them differentiate<br />
  7. 7. Planning and Preparing the Environment<br />Environment should support pretending<br />Teacher’s role<br />Serve as facilitator<br />Provide time, space, materials<br />Assist children in learning social interaction<br />Monitor area so that all children can participate<br />Value play<br />Safety<br />Anti-bias<br />Furniture and equipment considerations<br />
  8. 8. Adaptations for Children with Identified Needs<br />Apply only those rules needed for safety<br />Let the child take the lead<br />Clearly define space<br />Encourage verbalization<br />Offer familiar materials<br />Dress-up clothes—easy on and off<br />Supply supportive seating to offset fatigue<br />
  9. 9. Prop Boxes<br />Materials to enrich a theme<br />Consider storage and label clearly<br />Consider many sources for materials<br />Recycled or donated<br />Clothes for dramatic play<br />Access<br />Variety of roles, traditional, unisex<br />Variety of cultures<br />Squares of material, scarves<br />
  10. 10. Integrating Dramatic Play into the Curriculum<br />Infants<br />Doll corner<br />Home living area<br />Push-and-pull toys<br />Crawling and climbing area <br />Toddlers<br />Home living area<br />Dress-up clothes<br />Prop box<br />Puppet and mask play corner<br />Beauty/barber shop<br />
  11. 11. Integrating Dramatic Play into the Curriculum (continued)<br />Preschoolers<br />Travel agency<br />Ship<br />Train station and train<br />Airport and airplane<br />Supermarket/grocery store<br />Farmer’s market/Mercado<br />Picnic<br />Ants at a picnic<br />
  12. 12. Integrating Dramatic Play into the Curriculum (continued)<br />Primary-grade children<br />Rag doll/tin man/marionette<br />Paper exploration<br />Imaginary machine<br />Mirror images<br />
  13. 13. Dramatic Play and Other Issues<br />Integration with other curriculum areas<br />Language and literacy<br />Math and science concepts<br />Tips for teachers<br />Superheroes<br />NAEYC recommendations regarding superheroes play<br />Developmentally appropriate and multicultural/anti-bias activities<br />

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