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Jlsm vsengclasswritingasne12

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Comparison of journalistic writing and "English-class" writing plus slides that show the Common Core connections

Comparison of journalistic writing and "English-class" writing plus slides that show the Common Core connections


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  • 1. What makes news NewsWhy are my paragraphs so short? by Candace Perkins Bowen Associate professor Director, Center for Scholastic Journalism Kent State University cbowen@kent.edu
  • 2. Keep these ideas in mind:Each has a different audience.  With an English class essay, the writer usually has an audience of one — the teacher.  When writing for media, the writer has a much broader audience — the entire school or community.Each has a different purpose.  Usually the English essay writer is trying to impress the teacher… and get an A!  The journalist needs to clearly and often quickly inform, entertain or persuade an audience.
  • 3. Here are some differences…Journalistic writing has “English class” writing has short, concise sentences. longer, more complexJW has simple, sentences. understandable words. ECW uses more multi-JW uses short syllable words. paragraphs, often one or ECW often has two sentences. paragraphs of 100 words or more, including a topic sentence and its support.
  • 4. Organization varies…Newswriting is Essays traditionally are five traditionally arranged in paragraphs. an inverted pyramid. The first paragraph is the introduction and thesisThe first paragraph is the statement. lead -- with 5Ws and H. Second, third and fourthA summary lead is paragraphs develop the usually one sentence. topic using  Compare and contrastAdditional paragraphs  Definition are short and contain  Classification, etc. less and less important The final paragraph is the information. conclusion.
  • 5. Organization Five-Paragraph EssayInverted pyramid Intro/Thesis Lead – statement 5Ws & H Body Gets less important Conclusion
  • 6. information-gathering varies, too…Media writing uses lots Essays often require of primary sources. material from Interviews  Reading a particular  Experts work  Spokespersons  Drawing on insight and  Newsmakers information from previous readings or  ‘People on the street’ lecturesSecondary sources  Applying personal include: experience  Official records  Reference materials  Other media
  • 7. But keep in mindwhy that’s the case: Different audience Different purpose
  • 8. BEWARE OF PLAGIARISM! All writing needs attribution…Media writing works Essays use various attribution into context: citation forms:  “The result is dangerous,”  MLA Mayor Fred Norton said.  APA  According to the Health Commission’s survey, 27 This could include: percent of the participants  Footnotes or endnotes lost weight.  Parenthetical citationsThis is also necessary  Bibliography when using secondary sources the reporter didn’t interview:  “The result is dangerous,” Mayor Fred Norton told the Greenville Times.
  • 9. It’s not quite that simple, but…Not every assignment in English class is a five-paragraph essay. Not every story in the media is a traditional news story. Today’s publications — especially student media — often use news features.  These start with a “softer” lead  Anecdote  Description  Suspended interest, etc.  Organization varies but generally has  An interest-catching beginning  A “nut graph” to show the focus  An ending that makes it feel “finished”  Plenty of short, interesting quotes  Transition to tie all the parts together
  • 10. news and features don’t contain reporter opinionWhile all readers would agree, it’s not a “tragic fire.”Without a survey or other way to show this, it’s not accurate to say “everyone owns an iPod.” What is the source? Who researched this?And even if “Greenville High School is better off because she won the award,” the reporter shouldn’t be the one to say it.
  • 11. What IS the same?The basic writing process  Brainstorm for ideas  Gather information  Organize and select appropriate information  Write the first draft  Share with a coach  Use coaching suggestions and insight for second draft  Tweak as many times as necessary, polish and submit
  • 12. Common Core: College and career readiness anchor standards for writingGrades 6-12 – Text types & purposes1.Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. [editorials/columns/reviews]2.Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content. [in-depth news, features]3.Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details and well-structured event sequences. [narrative features]
  • 13. Common Core: College and career readiness anchor standards for writingGrades 6-12 – Production and Distribution1.Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. [any journalism]2.Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach. [editorial process – including possible alternative story forms]3.Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others. [definitely!]
  • 14. Common Core: College and career readiness anchor standards for writingGrades 6-12 – Range of writing1.Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) [publication cycle]2. and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences. [Web vs. newspaper or news magazine?]
  • 15. So…what else makes it Journalism?Writing for media, based on its purposehave something we call NEWS VALUES.  Timeliness  Proximity  Prominence  Human interest  Significance  Impact
  • 16. Good writing is still good writing…But when you become journalists, you have to remember you have  A different audience  A different purpose And that may mean leaving some of your English class writing behind, but it still means incorporating Common Core Standards.

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