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2014 editpolicyupdate
2014 editpolicyupdate
2014 editpolicyupdate
2014 editpolicyupdate
2014 editpolicyupdate
2014 editpolicyupdate
2014 editpolicyupdate
2014 editpolicyupdate
2014 editpolicyupdate
2014 editpolicyupdate
2014 editpolicyupdate
2014 editpolicyupdate
2014 editpolicyupdate
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2014 editpolicyupdate

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  • 1. Developing an editorial policy No matter what platform you use, the choice of an editorial policy can make or break your publication(s) – and consistency is highly recommended. What you select, and why, does make a difference
  • 2. Consider this policy: ―XXXX is created by the XXXX City Schools and published under the auspices of the Board of Education. XXXX is a curriculum taken for academic credit and has educational purposes as a regular classroom activity. No material shall be considered for publication that is libelous, obscene, profane, biased, prejudiced, unsuitable for its readers, or that defames character, encourages violation of laws or would cause disruption or material interference with the orderly operation and discipline of the school.‖
  • 3. Key words to note ―XXXX is created by the XXXX City Schools and published under the auspices of the Board of Education. XXXX is a curriculum taken for academic credit and has educational purposes as a regular classroom activity. No material shall be considered for publication that is libelous, obscene, profane, biased, prejudiced, unsuitable for its readers, or that defames character, encourages violation of laws or would cause disruption or material interference with the orderly operation and discipline of the school.‖
  • 4. Additional issues? The principal has the responsibility to monitor student verbal and written expression. Students who violate the standards for verbal and written expression will be subject to corrective action or discipline. The student publications instructor or adviser has the primary authority for supervising student publications and to see that the provisions incorporated into this policy and regulation are met and will, if necessary, edit, remove, or revise the content to ensure compliance therewith or for any other valid pedagogical reason.
  • 5. What should a solid policy include: First, note that all policies, no matter the platform, should be consistent in wording and intent. Several models exist and each have plusses and minuses. More on that soon. All no matter their source, should be precisely worded policies that protect all parties – as well as protect student freedoms and encourage journalistic responsibility.
  • 6. Our recommendations: • Statement of mission and journalistic principles • Statement of forum status/prior review • Role of the publication/media • Role of the adviser/school system • Rights and responsibilities of the student staff • Who makes final decisions of all content • Letters to the editor, advertisement policy, how to handle death reporting, use of others’ images, photo-manipulation • Comments policy, takedown policy
  • 7. What do we mean by a forum?Closed forum Limited forum Designated open forum for student expression Forums by policy/forums by practice Do you know which type you are – and why? Why is the designation important? Hint: 2nd Circuit decision—Ithaca; Seattle; Dean and Lange New rule: ―designated public forum‖ & state clearly that ―students make all final decisions of content‖
  • 8. Takedown policy Leave everything as is, if: the request is designed to avoid embarrassment, image; truth; credibility; no factual issue; historical record must be maintained based on your mission. Publish corrections, retractions or updates, if: info is factually or legally deficient when published; transparency of source inaccuracy; provide context and perspective; clarify or update; gray area solved by compromise. Take down information, if: info is fabricated; to protect sources; one-time reasons.
  • 9. Models to build from: JEA Model Guidelines http://jeasprc.org/wp- content/uploads/2009/10/jeamodeleditpolicy-2013.pdf JEA Digital Model Guidelines http://www.jeadigitalmedia.org/2011/07/11/schools- should-consider-collapsing-multiple-editorial-policies- into-one-media-policy/ SPLC Model Guidelines http://www.splc.org/knowyourrights/legalresearch.asp ?id=6 Each has plusses and minuses
  • 10. Your roles might be changing8 new functions for journalism Authenticator Sense maker Investigator Witness bearer Empowerer Smart aggregator Forum organizer Role model
  • 11. Wording to avoid: “When questions of good taste arise, or those which surpass social norms of good taste and decency, they shall be resolved in consultation with the involved reporter(s), the managing editor, the executive editor and the advisers.” “material not generally acceptable to this community” or “significant minority or the majority of the community.” “To create a wholesome school spirit and to support the best traditions of the school; “ The XXXXXX adviser and/or editors have the right to deny publication of any editorial, column, review, or comment.” Wording like publication is “ an open forum” but superintendent has final say, etc Develop acceptable methods for preserving the constitutional provision for free speech.” “material that endorses any candidate for public office or takes a political stand on any issue.” To promote and encourage school- sponsored activities; • To serve as public relations media To promote cooperation among taxpayers, parents, the school and its students
  • 12. Adviser Code of Ethics • Model standards of professional journalistic conduct to students, administrators and others • Empower students to make decisions of style, structure and content by creating a learning atmosphere where students will actively practice critical thinking and decision making • Encourage students to seek out points of view and to explore a variety of information sources in their decision making • Support and defend a free, robust and active forum for student expression without prior review or restraint • Emphasize the importance of accuracy, balance and clarity in all aspects of news gathering and reporting
  • 13. Adviser Code of Ethics • Show trust in students as they carry out their responsibilities by encouraging and supporting them in a caring, learning environment • Remain informed on press rights and responsibilities • Advise, not act as censors or decisions makers • Display professional and personal integrity in situations which might be construed as potential conflicts of interest • Support free expression for others in local and larger communities • Model effective communications skills by continuously updating knowledge of media education

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