Simple strategies for creating more engaging elearning

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Presentation at ASTD International Conference and Expo on Monday, May 20, 2013.

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  • Flickr Photo: “Always be nice to the lunch lady” by MelvinSchlubman
  • So what are some ways to focus attention and minimize distractions in what is inherently a passive experience (elearning)
  • Get the learner to sit up – make them DO something right away. Get straight into the action. Ask questions – this focuses the learner’s attention on what they don’t know – and presumably what you’re going to cover in the program Find the killer fact, stat, or quote Lead with a killer mistake Some mistakes make such an impact on business performance that it’s worth highlighting them upfront to the learner. For example: “Did you know that 40% of our customers go elsewhere for services they would happily buy from us if they know we offered them?”
  • Ask provocative questions – turn things around in a surprising way. Rattle expectations a bit… Learn from the marketing team – strong visuals and text to hook the learner emotionally. ink to application share... http://www.kineo.com/showcase/file.php/30/age/index.html As a first screen, it ’ s a very good attention grabber... Ask provocotavie questions.
  • AIDA = Awareness, Interest, Desire, Action
  • We ’ ve all been handed a lengthy PPT or dry source content to start from. I like to call this “ clicky-clicky blah-blah ” .
  • What We Did A demo... Wish you were here...about the vacation policy – the surprise is that if you don ’ t go on holiday, it suggests you ’ re up to no good. They want you to take vacations so they engatge you upfront. This also shows you what can go wrong – what happens when you don ’ t follow the policy? Peer pressure – everyone’s doing – these success stories show how people who’ve mastered this learning are now benefiting from it. (Some clients have told us, “people are bored with that risk thing – we see it in all of the compliance courses…” The peer pressure approach can be a good alternative. Or perhaps the utopian ideal if we all learn this…e.g. BIW scenario “In the ideal workplace…”) Tell a story – show the risk (Michael Allen’s famous plane crash example, which has now entered into the annals of eLearning legend. Who’s heard of it? Who’s actually seen the presentation? Who’s actually seen that eLearning? Can I show this demo – or just screen capture? (I could mask the screen capture...) all my points made at the elearning guild still stand though - got good reactions when they put it in front of target audience as a potential approach. [5:29:25 PM] Stephen Walsh: and the HR dept were nervous about the approach etc.
  • Show demo…
  • So, how can we help those relatively new to the field deliver effective learning solutions as soon as possible? Rather than approaching every new project as a shot in the dark, roll-up-your-sleeves and-start-from-scratch initiative, we’ve identified a core set of learning design models to help. Even inexperienced practitioners can quickly understand these models and easily apply them to the vast majority of learning requirements that come their way. These models combine some of the best principles and leading practices gained from our years of research and experience. They can give your internal teams a shared vocabulary and point of view and ensures every program has a solid instructional design strategy at its foundation.
  • Whatever learning model you choose to use, there are some components that we think should always be present in the most effective learning experiences: the Start and the Finish. Sandwiched between this beginning and end you’ll find our learning models – where the core learning takes place. It’s the filling that you choose that makes each learning experience fundamentally different from each other.
  • All the best learning experiences should start by engaging the learner (the ‘what’s in it for me?’ element) and then providing the information they need to get the most out of the learning experience (setting the direction).
  • All the best learning experiences should start by engaging the learner (the ‘what’s in it for me?’ element) and then providing the information they need to get the most out of the learning experience (setting the direction).
  • You then need to finish the experience by making sure the learner goes away with the key learning points clearly summarized and, most importantly, with their next actions laid out—what they need to do to apply what they have learned in the real world. (Of course, it should rightly be pointed out that learning never finishes, but formal more structured learning experiences do have some form of end, often a launch pad to start applying those skills and ideas in the workplace.)
  • Let ’ s look at each in turn…
  • This was the original content we got from them...
  • Less is more!
  • Keep it light.
  • Keep it light.
  • Point about not being patronising
  • Reading from computer screens is about 25% slower than reading from paper Write 50% less text – and allow for images too Keep to short sentences, short paragraphs “ If I ’ d had more time, I would ’ ve written a shorter letter. ”
  • Reading from computer screens is about 25% slower than reading from paper Write 50% less text – and allow for images too Keep to short sentences, short paragraphs “ If I ’ d had more time, I would ’ ve written a shorter letter. ”
  • Reading from computer screens is about 25% slower than reading from paper Write 50% less text – and allow for images too Keep to short sentences, short paragraphs “ If I ’ d had more time, I would ’ ve written a shorter letter. ”
  • So how do you push back on that – Advertising – we get this message out to our customers in a fun catchy way, why not sell the learning this way as well? It capture interest Conversational tone engages more... Ask the learners what they prefer.
  • Most learners click NEXT on this slide.
  • Set direction via a menu. By using really clear wording – take it in, etc. The menu sets the direction for the whole program.
  • file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/Cammy%20Bean/My%20Documents/Demos/M&S%20Writing%20Skills/main.html
  • Get war stories from your best people Get true stories from your newer people (they still know what they didn’t know) You don’t need fancy equipment We recorded this with skype + audacity – both free UFI_ask the expert.swf When you click on these you just hear short audio – no moving video or flipping stills. Sometimes these are video – sometimes just audio with stills. (think flip video camera – even an iPod Nano/or iPhone now has video)
  • Do an .flv/.swf… Video and audio where it counts Guerilla approaches to shooting and audio Flip video for secret shopper Skype for expert interviews
  • Are these the types of questions your courses include?
  • Are these the types of questions your courses include?
  • Are these the types of questions your courses include?
  • Make more mistakes. Find the mistakes that hurt the most Keep ‘ em real Play it out Provide useful feedback
  • Make it hard.
  • Show mistakes and what you can learn from them… As part of your initial TNA – find out where people make the most common (or the most painful mistakes) – make that the focale point of your design.
  • Space it out – create a campaign of events – emails, links, etc. – over a sustained period of time. Gentle nudges, short sharp eLearning bits to keep the concepts alive.
  • What ’ s the final call to action – Call to action and don’t let go what was the point of the whole thing in the first place. What do you need to go out and do.
  • They ’ re coming to get you… Take the Call to Action and make it personal. In this case, a real-live manager will follow up with the learner…
  • More call to actions...with specific links to take the experience beyond the eLearning event... ” beyond the course ”
  • Using survey monkey to get calls to action
  • http://www.kineo.com/elearning-reports/free-guide-10-ways-to-yawn-proof-your-e-learning.html
  • Contact us!
  • Simple strategies for creating more engaging elearning

    1. 1. Simple Strategies for CreatingMore Engaging E-LearningCammy BeanASTD ICE 2013
    2. 2. At a training department near you, SMEs arehanding off their slide decks.
    3. 3. You have to transform that dump into elearning.
    4. 4. You’ve got three short weeks to build it, butthere’s too much to do!*Time* ticking away: http://www.flickr.com/people/mike9alive/
    5. 5. You want a more streamlined process andbetter eLearning outcomes.
    6. 6. Yawn-proof your elearning without busting thebank with these top tips.
    7. 7. How long have you been involved withelearning projects?I haven’t worked on any yet (that’s why I’mhere!)0.1-1 years2-5 years6-10 years10+ years
    8. 8. What’s the most boringprogram you’ve everhad to work on?What are you currentlyworking on?
    9. 9. A cautionary tale.
    10. 10. Tip 1:Get their attention.
    11. 11. Case Study: The Vacation Policy“In keeping with the overall control environment and toensure compliance with internal control guidelines issuedby its regulators, AceFinancial has a Global InvestmentBank Vacation Policy. In EMEA, the requirements of thispolicy (which are set out below) also apply to the PrivateBank, AceFinancial Partners and the Chief InvestmentOffice. TSS staff are required to comply with their ownLOB policy. In summary, the policy requires certainemployees in sensitive positions (“DesignatedEmployees”) to be out of the office for a specified periodof time each calendar year...”
    12. 12. Tip 2:Give it some structure!
    13. 13. Use Learning Models to get your teamcreating better elearning more quickly.
    14. 14. The eLearningSandwichThe beginning, the end, and allthat’s in between…
    15. 15. In thebeginning,gainattentionand setdirection
    16. 16. Next, youlayer in thelearningmodels—where thecorelearningtakes place
    17. 17. Three main reasons for a learningexperience:To informor raiseawarenessTo improveknowledgeand skillsTo changeattitude orbehavior
    18. 18. Process Flow; Topic Categories;Search and Find: E-magazinesPresent: Expert Views; Guided StoriesExemplify & Explore: Best Practices;Ask the Expert; Multiple Viewpoints;See It, Analyze It; Plan It, Do It, ReviewIt etcTest: Check questions; ScenariosScenario Based: Try It, Learn It;Full Branching; Limited LevelSimulation; Change the StoryInformationKnowledge & SkillsBehavior &attitude change
    19. 19. At the end,summarizeand decidenext stepsor actions
    20. 20. Tip 3:Don’t be tone deaf –write for the people,man!
    21. 21. Our 5 rule framework1.Keep it light1.Give it spirit2.Have a conversation3.Call for action4.Be adult
    22. 22. “As café staff, it’s compulsorythat you maintain quality ofproduce and serve it asspecified by the Quality FoodManual. By the end of thistraining you will understand howto serve every food typeaccording to the standards.”“As café staff, it’s compulsorythat you maintain quality ofproduce and serve it asspecified by the Quality FoodManual. By the end of thistraining you will understand howto serve every food typeaccording to the standards.”
    23. 23. Boring!
    24. 24. 1. Keep it light
    25. 25. Short, snappy, to the point. And a little fun.Less of…“This e-learning module is designed toexplain the principles and practicalrequirements of the 11 step process …”More of…“Need to get your head around ourprocess? You’re in the right place.”Or…“Process – boring, right? Wrong. This onewill help you, all 11 steps of it. See it tobelieve it.”
    26. 26. Light touch – colloquialA little pun – links to later content
    27. 27. It could have been so much more formal...
    28. 28. 2. Give it spirit!
    29. 29. Make it energetic, driven, engaging.Less of…“Now that you have covered thebasics of customer service, in the nextsection you will learn how to deal withcustomer issues.”More of…“You’re one step away frommaximizing your skills, but there’s aproblem – a customer one in fact.Click next to put your service skills tothe test.”
    30. 30. Get to the point quickly.Set up in 3 sentences.Professional, to thepoint, not a wordwasted.
    31. 31. 3. Have a conversation.You talkin’to me?
    32. 32. Direct, clear, dialogue, questioning.Less of…“Negotiating effectively is animportant skill that we all useon a daily basis”More of…“When was the last time younegotiated something?Maybe it was more recentlythan you think….”
    33. 33. What’s on your mind?
    34. 34. It’s all about you.
    35. 35. Interview your SMEs and then use theirwords – not their bullets!
    36. 36. 4. Call for action
    37. 37. Give direction, focus on actions and tasks – it’swhat happens next that counts.Less of…“You’ve now completed this section onPBX sales. Go back to the menu tomake another selection.”More of…“Now review your own client list. Whocould benefit from the PBX product?Plan the time to call them now.”
    38. 38. You want actions? I’ll give you actions…Each one about action
    39. 39. 5. Be adult
    40. 40. Learners are busy professionals. Treat them likegrown ups and don’t patronize.Less of…“By now you have learned…”“You must do…”“This will take 90 minutes”More of…“Take 5 minutes to findout how to run effective meetings.”
    41. 41. What’s wrong with this picture?
    42. 42. Keep it short.
    43. 43. Active, not passive sentences.
    44. 44. Use headings to layer information.Magazine style title asquestion –conversation with thelearnerKeeping theinstruction simpleand informal
    45. 45. What are the problems with trying to writethis way?
    46. 46. Some of the barriers we’ve run into...• “That’s not our style.”• “It’s not professional enough.”• “But I want ALL of my content in there – where’dit go?”• “This is going to senior members of staff...”• “This is serious learning!”
    47. 47. Tip 4:Object to learningobjectives.
    48. 48. Traditional objectivesAs a result of attending this session you will beable to:• Identify three case studies of Fortune 1000 companieswho are successfully using social learning models• Define the three models of social learning and how thesemap to specific strategies and tools• Evaluate the pros and cons of different socialinterventions as solutions to specific kinds of learningchallenges• Describe their own personal experience in using socialmedia as a practitioner
    49. 49. Set direction
    50. 50. Tip 5:Get the best stories.
    51. 51. Tip 6:Make it hurt so good.
    52. 52. Question 1 of 524:1.There are ___ Customers types serviced by ACME.
    53. 53. Question 2 of 524:These customer types arei. ________ ____ ______;ii. _____ ________ _____ ;iii. ________ ____ _____;iv. ______ _______ ________ (___) ____________; andv. ______ __________ ____ _______ ____ _____.
    54. 54. Question 3 of 524:True or False?Small Business Owners would benefit from the service ACMEoffers of managing money and good accounting records
    55. 55. “If I had to live my life again, Id make the samemistakes, only sooner.”~ Tallulah Bankhead
    56. 56. Tip 7:Think outside thecourse.
    57. 57. Let’s review!
    58. 58. Tip 1:Get their attention.
    59. 59. Tip 2:Give it some structure!
    60. 60. Tip 3:Don’t be tone deaf.
    61. 61. Tip 4:Object to learningobjectives.
    62. 62. Tip 5:Get the best stories.
    63. 63. Tip 6:Make it hurt so good.
    64. 64. Tip 7:Think outside thecourse.
    65. 65. So think back to thatcurrent or most boringproject…Anything you might dodifferently now?
    66. 66. Questions?
    67. 67. www.kineo.com
    68. 68. email: cammy.bean@kineo.comTwitter: @cammybeanBlog : http://cammybean.kineo.com/Get lots of free stuff on the Kineo website:www.kineo.com
    69. 69. Your Feedback Counts!Your feedback helps ASTD continue to providetop-notch educational programs that help youstay on top of a changing profession.Evaluation forms for this session are availableNOW via the mobile app and at the followinglink: www.astdconference.org.

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