Marginalizing Access To The Sustainable Food System
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Marginalizing Access To The Sustainable Food System

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Quadrant Fellowship Presentation, October 13, 2010.

Quadrant Fellowship Presentation, October 13, 2010.

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Marginalizing Access To The Sustainable Food System Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Marginalizing Access to the Sustainable Food System: Examining Oakland’s Minority Districts Camille Tuason Mata Quadrant Fellowship Presentation October 13, 2010 University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • 2. Existing Literature
    • Unequal access to food (marginalization)
      • Low intake of fresh foods: poor health conditions
      • Spatial access
      • Grocery store density
      • Weak transportation infrastructure
      • Low intake of fresh foods::high production levels
  • 3. Research Question
    • How marginalized are minority residents in the West Oakland, Fruitvale, and Chinatown districts from the sustainable food system?
  • 4. Research Framework
    • What constitutes marginalization? How to measure marginalization?
      • Spatial access
        • Transportation network
        • Food venues
          • Grocery store density
          • Farmer’s markets
          • Urban and school yard gardens
        • CSA drop-offs
      • History
        • Minorities in American (organic) farming
        • CSAs drop-offs
      • Participation
        • (organic) farming
        • Knowledge community
  • 5. Study Site 1
    • 94607 (West Oakland): 50.8% African American (2000 U.S. Census)
  • 6. Study Site 2
    • 94607 (Chinatown): 26.7% Asian American (2000 U.S. Census)
  • 7. Study Site 3
    • 94601 (Fruitvale): 49.6% Hispanic American (2000 U.S. Census)
  • 8. Methodologies
    • Census data
    • Existing publications
    • Field observation
      • Farmer’s markets
      • Urban gardens
      • Grocery stores
    • Surveys
      • Grocery store merchants
    • Door to Door Surveys
      • Lower bottom residents
    • Interviews
      • CSA farmers (phone)
      • WOFC (phone)
        • OBUGs
        • Mo’ Better Foods
        • City Slickers Gardens
        • People’s Market
  • 9. Research Findings
    • Unequal access to food differed across the three minority districts:
      • West Oakland less food secure
      • Fruitvale and Chinatown sold foods from Asia and South America
    • All grocery stores offered low volumes of organic foods.
    • Minority farmer participation is low.
      • Might affect their servicing minority neighborhoods
    • CSA farms continue to service predominantly white neighborhoods.
      • Distribution scale to minority district neighborhoods constrained by costs of delivery
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  • 16. Exceptions to marginalization
    • Social and environmental activists very involved in improving access to organic foods:
      • School yard gardens
      • Urban food gardens
      • Organic farmer’s markets
    • Extensive transportation network
  • 17. Research gaps
    • Little data on minority participation in organic farming
    • Little effort to comprehensively map out the sustainable food system
    • Exploring different ways to participate in CSA programs
    • How to retain interest in farmer’s markets