Effective segmentation for a post-PC age

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With revenue growth stalled, telecom operators must find opportunities in new customer segments. But their traditional connectivity-centric targeting and segmentation measures are falling short. To …

With revenue growth stalled, telecom operators must find opportunities in new customer segments. But their traditional connectivity-centric targeting and segmentation measures are falling short. To stand any chance of success, telcos must take a much closer look at how people work and what tools they use as the post-PC world takes shape.

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  • 1. Effective segmentation for a post-PC age Camille Mendler Principal Analyst camille.mendler@informa.com Informa Telecoms & Media 2014 Industry Outlook London: Nov. 7, 2013
  • 2. Segmentation is now a critical task ‘Digital’ M2M Cloud Smart cities APIs Smart grid Enterprise Growth pursuits are diverse Big Data ICT Two thirds of CSPs hope to find top-line growth in new segments. Source: Flickr/Adrian Hand www.informatandm.com © Informa UK Limited 2013. All rights reserved 2
  • 3. Market vision is obscured Obstructions include: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Thinking bigger is better Worshipping fallen idols Practising class discrimination Creating new silos Believing one size fits all The hunt for ‘new’ segments is really about focus adjustment. Source: Flickr/Edie** www.informatandm.com © Informa UK Limited 2013. All rights reserved 3
  • 4. 1. Thinking bigger is better Firms by employee numbers 0-9 Number of firms per country Italy Portugal 68% of GDP 80% of GDP Indonesia 250 + employees France UAE UK Workforce distribution by firm size Proportion of employees by firm size 57% of GDP 50 - 249 Italy Portugal 51% of GDP 40% of GDP 62% of GDP France UAE Source: Eurostat, UAE Ministry of Labour, IFC, Census Indonesia. Indonesia 10 - 49 UK Over 70% of CSP enterprise assets are dedicated to 0.5% of firms. www.informatandm.com © Informa UK Limited 2013. All rights reserved 4
  • 5. 2. Worshipping fallen idols 1983 2013 Today, 65% of CSP SaaS offers still assume a PC only for access. www.informatandm.com © Informa UK Limited 2013. All rights reserved 5
  • 6. 3. Practising class discrimination Job distribution by industry Information + communication Managers, directors, senior officials Professional, scientific + technical Professional occupations Wholesale + retail trade Source: Eurostat and Informa Telecoms & Media Manufacturing Construction Transportation + storage Accommodation + food 0% 20% 40% 60% % of total industry workforce 80% Associate professional + technical Sales + customer service Administrative + secretarial Other occupations 100% The primary focus of CSPs is office-based, white-collar workers. www.informatandm.com © Informa UK Limited 2013. All rights reserved 6
  • 7. 4. Creating new silos «Conversations» Satellite Microwave GPRS Wi-Fi On-prem ZigBee Bluetooth etc…. LTE Weightless 6LoWPAN Cloud MPLS Are you really offering “unified” communications yet? www.informatandm.com © Informa UK Limited 2013. All rights reserved 7
  • 8. 5. Believing one size fits all Which business processes do you MOST want to improve? (Top 5 by industry – correlated) General administration 47% Customer service 43% Sales / marketing Customer / guest profiling 30% 36% Common to all, but not most important 45% 55% 60% 19% 36% 27% Time management Transit times 39% 71% Client communication Payment processing 30% 26% 53% 38% Document management 31% Shipment / delivery tracking 30% Other 6% Retail Hospitality Transport/Logistics 34% Booking management Professional services n=828 European SMEs Percentage of respondents by industry Source: Informa Telecoms & Media, 2013 Most CSPs build portfolios around common denominators – but not necessarily the most important. www.informatandm.com © Informa UK Limited 2013. All rights reserved 8
  • 9. Let’s thank the PC for its impact on work Working tasks: Distribution over time Workforce Knowledge-centric activities grow 1960 1970 1959 Peter Drucker coins the term ‘Knowledge Worker’ 1980 1990 1981 IBM PC launched 1998 2002 Machines take over many activities 2000 World’s first 3G network Source: The Skill Content of Recent Technological Change, Quarterly Journal of Economics (Nov. 2003); and Informa Telecoms & Media An extraordinary shift has occurred over the past 30 years. www.informatandm.com © Informa UK Limited 2013. All rights reserved 9
  • 10. And there’s further to go Transactional Collaborative Routine manual tasks Complex communication Parts assembly, photocopying Training, advising, selling Non-routine manual tasks Driving, repair, serving Knowledge centric Routine cognitive tasks Expert thinking Measuring, inspecting Diagnosing, designing Man vs machine – or a closer relationship? www.informatandm.com © Informa UK Limited 2013. All rights reserved 10
  • 11. We need to focus on individual roles Source: Flickr/EVMaiden www.informatandm.com © Informa UK Limited 2013. All rights reserved 11
  • 12. Identify – and triage – business processes Industry Transactional Collaborative Knowledge centric Lawyer • • • • • • • • • Consultancy Design Diagnosis Sales & marketing outreach • • • Menu design, portion sizing Sales & marketing outreach Pricing policy • • • Stock composition Pricing policy Sales & marketing outreach • • Audit Project mgmt • • Sales & marketing outreach Audit Restaurateur Document mgmt Appointments Time tracking Data entry Client and team communication ‘Dematerialize’ manual processes • Payment • Order processing • Order taking Retail store owner • • Construction foreman • Document mgmt (bids, designs) Real estate broker • • Document mgmtSpeed knowledge creation • Field to office Data entry / Inventory communication mgmt Quality checks • Payment • Order processing, Inventory multi-channel collaboration mgmt logistics, tracking Enable • Field to office communication Consider the range of tools – and then the connectivity – appropriate to the task. www.informatandm.com © Informa UK Limited 2013. All rights reserved 12
  • 13. Expect new tools to become invisible Human plus? Our cognitive actions align to the tools we use* Neolithic axe Computer mouse GPS tracker *Source: Dotov DG, Nie L, Chemero A (2010) A Demonstration of the Transition from Ready-to-Hand to Unready-to-Hand, Franklin & Marshall College The tool isn’t separate - it’s implicit to the value proposition. www.informatandm.com © Informa UK Limited 2013. All rights reserved 13
  • 14. Final thoughts • Put segmentation at the top of your strategic agenda • Finding ‘new’ growth segments might simply require focus adjustment. • Don’t use connectivity-centric metrics to size your opportunity • Consider individual roles and how to improve business processes versus counting what to connect. • Connected devices will become invisible in the post-PC world • Their role in human work will be so deeply embedded that they will often be unnoticed.
  • 15. Thank you! Camille Mendler Principal Analyst Email: camille.mendler@informa.com Twitter: @cmendler © Informa UK Limited 2013. All rights reserved The contents of this publication are protected by international copyright laws, database rights and other intellectual property rights. The owner of these rights is Informa UK Limited, our affiliates or other third party licensors. All product and company names and logos contained within or appearing on this publication are the trade marks, service marks or trading names of their respective owners, including Informa UK Limited. This publication may not be: (a) copied or reproduced; or (b) lent, resold, hired out or otherwise circulated in any way or form without the prior permission of Informa UK Limited. Whilst reasonable efforts have been made to ensure that the information and content of this publication was correct as at the date of first publication, neither Informa UK Limited nor any person engaged or employed by Informa UK Limited accepts any liability for any errors, omissions or other inaccuracies. Readers should independently verify any facts and figures as no liability can be accepted in this regard - readers assume full responsibility and risk accordingly for their use of such information and content. Any views and/or opinions expressed in this publication by individual authors or contributors are their personal views and/or opinions and do not necessarily reflect the views and/or opinions of Informa UK Limited.