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Globalization and education    critical perspectives      Nicholas C. Burbules   & Carlos Alberto Torres (ed.)       Chapt...
Globalisation and the NewSocial Movements:           Chapter 13:Lessons for Critical Theory and PedagogyBy Douglas Kellner...
The article sorts out some of the dominant uses of the term globalisation and itschallenges for critical pedagogy and radi...
Meaning of Globalisation.• Westernization of the world Vs cover for Ascendency of  Capitalism• Generation of increasing ho...
“…….While globalisation can significantlyincreases the power of big corporations and biggovernments, it can also empower g...
Globalisation: Reality or a Paint? There is no such thing as “globalization” as per  see other than being a theoretical c...
Agitators and Critics of             Globalisation• economic and social         • devastating destruction  progress,      ...
Resistance to GlobalisationImperialism and Modernisation                                    Education                     ...
Conclusion.
Chapter 12:A Situated Perspective on Cultural          Globalization    By Allan Luke and Carmen Luke
A situated account of cultural                globalization• in Southeast Asia, and Thailand in particular
The offical Thai translation of        globalization:    logapiwatanam = the Thai world            combined with   apiwata...
Educational policy reform• Australian scolars: contracted to deliver  curriculum on Thai terms• Thailand tertiery educatio...
The educatinal issues of ”New Times”• Competing discourses about the role of  education in ”development”• Globalized marke...
Thailand never colonized• Do not ’other’ us:• The ”subaltern” is a western intellectual  construct and is not an identity ...
Wanted: Performance indicators, quality  assurance, school-based management=technocratic, neliberal educational agendabegu...
Conclusion
Thailand’s Education Policy• In lieu of the 1997 Constitution and the 1999 Education Act,  the Government is determined to...
Burbules, N. C. & Torres, C. A. (2000). Globalization and Education: Critical perspectives. New Yourk: Routledge. (12-13)
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Burbules, N. C. & Torres, C. A. (2000). Globalization and Education: Critical perspectives. New Yourk: Routledge. (12-13)

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Transcript of "Burbules, N. C. & Torres, C. A. (2000). Globalization and Education: Critical perspectives. New Yourk: Routledge. (12-13)"

  1. 1. Globalization and education critical perspectives Nicholas C. Burbules & Carlos Alberto Torres (ed.) Chapters 12 and 13 Presented by Seme and Wencke January 23rd 2012
  2. 2. Globalisation and the NewSocial Movements: Chapter 13:Lessons for Critical Theory and PedagogyBy Douglas Kellner by Douglas Kellner
  3. 3. The article sorts out some of the dominant uses of the term globalisation and itschallenges for critical pedagogy and radical democratic politics.• Globalization in Use: Context, purpose and people against Purpose and effects.• Theorist urged that the world is organized by expanding globalization which strengthen the dominance of the world capitalist economic system through transnational corporations and organisations creating a global culture.
  4. 4. Meaning of Globalisation.• Westernization of the world Vs cover for Ascendency of Capitalism• Generation of increasing homogeneity Vs production of diversity and heterogeneity• Business: strategy for increasing corporate profits and power• Government: deployed to promote increase in state power• NGOs: lever to produce positive social goods like democratisation or empowering of disempowered groups through new technology and media.
  5. 5. “…….While globalisation can significantlyincreases the power of big corporations and biggovernments, it can also empower groups andindividuals who were previously left out of thedemocratic dialogue and terrain of politicalstruggle…….”
  6. 6. Globalisation: Reality or a Paint? There is no such thing as “globalization” as per see other than being a theoretical construct used as a cover for heterogeneity of processes such as:• discourse of “imperialism, (modernist)” (negative, critical)• ideological conceptions of “modernization, (Post- Modernist)”(positive, legitimating)thus globalisation displaces the discourses of imperialism(bad) and modernization(good)
  7. 7. Agitators and Critics of Globalisation• economic and social • devastating destruction progress, of local traditions • the continued• technological innovation, subordination of poorer nations and regions by• more diverse products richer ones and services • environmental• a cornucopia of info. and destruction growing cultural freedom • homogenization/standa rdization of culture and• higher standard of living everyday life.
  8. 8. Resistance to GlobalisationImperialism and Modernisation Education New technology Industrialisation GLOBALISATION culture Modernisation Commodification of education New Technologies and social Business forces in education movements
  9. 9. Conclusion.
  10. 10. Chapter 12:A Situated Perspective on Cultural Globalization By Allan Luke and Carmen Luke
  11. 11. A situated account of cultural globalization• in Southeast Asia, and Thailand in particular
  12. 12. The offical Thai translation of globalization: logapiwatanam = the Thai world combined with apiwatana = to spread, to reach, to win over ”the expansion of the world, spread around the world, and change and effect all over the world”
  13. 13. Educational policy reform• Australian scolars: contracted to deliver curriculum on Thai terms• Thailand tertiery education sector• Goal: a pedagogy and curriculum, purpuse- built for problematizing globalization and New Times• Locally driven curriculum development, instructional innovation, institutional reorganization
  14. 14. The educatinal issues of ”New Times”• Competing discourses about the role of education in ”development”• Globalized marketplace of educational partners• Belendings of Indigenous/Chinese/Khmer cultures: Thai cultures are hybrids; products of years of cultural change and exchange
  15. 15. Thailand never colonized• Do not ’other’ us:• The ”subaltern” is a western intellectual construct and is not an identity Asian cultures identify with• Are not victims without agency
  16. 16. Wanted: Performance indicators, quality assurance, school-based management=technocratic, neliberal educational agendabegun with reviewing and distributing key Western work on globalization. This is how the ’West’ is theorizing ’you’, and then moving toward the critique of those positions, reworking those texts with students’ local analyses of the actual discourses, practices, and effects of globalization on Thai life.” p.295
  17. 17. Conclusion
  18. 18. Thailand’s Education Policy• In lieu of the 1997 Constitution and the 1999 Education Act, the Government is determined to launch educational reforms with the aim of developing Thailand into a knowledge-based society, which is a pre-requisite for becoming a knowledge- based economy. The reforms will provide the Thai public with equal access to life-long education and training, enabling them to acquire knowledge and capital to generate income and to eventually pull the country out of the economic and social crisis. Towards this end, the Government will abide by the principle that "Education Builds the Nation, Empowers the Individual and Generates Employment"
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