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Language course design

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Presentation for the first class of the course "Language Course Design" at the Advanced Graduate Deploma in Teaching English as a Foreign Language at Universidad Simon Bolivar, Caracas, Venezuela.

Presentation for the first class of the course "Language Course Design" at the Advanced Graduate Deploma in Teaching English as a Foreign Language at Universidad Simon Bolivar, Caracas, Venezuela.

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  • 1. Language Course Design:Introduction and definitions
  • 2. Getting started What is the typical situation for a teacher regarding a language course? How could the study of course design help you in your professional career? Have you ever had to design a language course in your context? In short, what do you expect of this course?
  • 3. Course design defined Process Designing/creating Instructional system Development of L2 knowledge and skills
  • 4. Course design defined Steps/phases/ Systematic stages Process Goal- Developmental oriented
  • 5. Course design defined Goal(s) Learners Instructional Instructional Procedures materials System Activities Teacher(s) Assessment
  • 6. Course design defined Pronunciation Grammar Vocabulary General interest L2 Knowledge/ Special purpose skills Speaking Writing Reading Listening
  • 7. Some important terms • Syllabus • Curriculum
  • 8. Syllabus vs. Curriculum CURRICULA are concerned with making general statements about language learning, learning purpose and experience, evaluation and the relationships between teachers and learners… [ they also include] banks of learning items and suggestions about how these might be used in class Nunan, 1988, p. 3
  • 9. Syllabus vs. Curriculum CURRICULUM refers to the collectivity of course offerings at an educational institution… Yalden, 1987, p. 72
  • 10. Syllabus vs. Curriculum CURRICULUM is a very general concept which involves considerations of the whole complex of philosophical, social and administrative factors which contribute to the planning of an educational programme. Allen, 1984, p. 6
  • 11. Syllabus vs. Curriculum CURRICULUM planning involves such things as the setting of goals, , the selection of materials and teaching approaches, the design of the testing program, and the appropriate use of program-evaluation procedures… Omaggio, 1986, p. 408
  • 12. Syllabus vs. Curriculum CURRICULUM involves “progress systematically from needs assessment, to goals and objectives, to specification of the instructional content of the program” Richards, 1990, p. 8
  • 13. Syllabus vs. Curriculum Syllabus provides direction and guidance in the scope, sequence and pacing of classroom activities. Omaggio, 1986, p. 410
  • 14. Syllabus vs. Curriculum Syllabus design is concerned with the choice and sequencing of instructional content. Richards, 1990, p. 8
  • 15. Syllabus vs. Curriculum Syllabi are more localized and are based on accounts and records of what actually happens at the classroom level as teachers and learners apply a given curriculum to their own situation. Nunan, 1988, p. 3
  • 16. Syllabus vs. Curriculum Syllabus means the specification of content for a single course or subject. Yalden, 1987, p. 72
  • 17. Syllabus vs. Curriculum Syllabus refers to that subpart of the curriculum which is concerned with a specification of what units will be taught. Allen, 1984, p. 6
  • 18. Course design: The process Step1 Step 7 Step 2 Step 6 Step 3 Step 5 Step 4
  • 19. Stages in educational planning National ministeries/offices Curriculum Regional administrative unit The Institution Syllabus The department Lesson The classroom
  • 20. Reflection Think about your teaching context… Is there a programme document stating purpose, objectives, contents, scope and sequence, teaching materials, methodology and assessment? What kind of instructional materials are used: commercial textbook or in-house materials? What was your level of participation in the decision about objectives, content and sequence? Is there an explicit statement of the view of language and language learning underlying the programme?
  • 21. References Allen, J.P. (1984). General purpose language teaching: a variable focus approach. In Brumfit, C.J. (Ed.) General purpose syllabus design. Oxford: Pergamon. Nunan, D. (1988). Syllabus design. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Richards, J.C. (1990). The language teaching matrix. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Yalden, J. (1987). Principles of course design for language teaching. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • 22. References Allen, J.P. (1984). General purpose language teaching: a variable focus approach. In Brumfit, C.J. (Ed.) General purpose syllabus design. Oxford: Pergamon. Nunan, D. (1988). Syllabus design. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Omaggio, A.C. (1986). Teaching language in context. Proficiency oriented instyruction. Boston: Heinle & Heinle Publishers, Inc. Richards, J.C. (1990). The language teaching matrix. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Yalden, J. (1987). Principles of course design for language teaching. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

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