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Wild Edibles      of the lowcountry
A little background...
A little background...     Please realize that I’m not
A little background...     Please realize that I’m not
A little background...            Please realize that I’m not And...don’t ever eat anything you’re                not 100%...
A little background...            Please realize that I’m not And...don’t ever eat anything you’re                not 100%...
This is me...as a sea turtle.
Wild Edibles in the LowcountryForaging for fun and education.
Yaupon HollyIlex Vomitoria
Natural History✤   Species ‘vomitoria’ misnomer✤   Only native plant in North    America that contains caffeine.✤   Grows ...
Cultural History✤   Native Americans used Yaupon    Holly in their purification    ceremonies (Cassina    Ceremony) aka Bla...
Glasswortsalicornia europaea
Natural History✤   succulent halophytes (juicy    salt-loving plants)✤   also known as sea pickle✤   turns a reddish orang...
Cultural History✤   Historically, glasswort was    burned down to ash to make    soda ash which is a key    ingredient in ...
American Beauty BerryCallicarpa americana
Natural History✤   callicarpinal, found in the    leaves, is an active compound    used in mosquito repellent.✤   Often th...
Cultural History✤   Native americans used    Beautyberries from the roots:    stomach ache and fever, from    the leaves s...
Dog Fennel       Eupatorium capillifoliumDate
Natural History✤   Often considered a pest plant/    weed.✤   has a slight licorice odor and    flavor✤   mild muscle relax...
Pennywort (dollar weed)hydrocotyle sp.
Natural History✤   Water and shade loving✤   completely edible, just make    sure to watch where you pick it    up.✤   nut...
Gotu Kolacentella asiatica
Natural History✤   Used widely around the world    as a well known tonic,    stimulant, dieuretic,    antibacterial, anti ...
Pinepinus taeda
Natural History✤   High in vitamin A and C, pine    needles can be cooked in water    to make a refreshing, albeit,    pot...
Thank you!!!
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Wild edibles of the lowcountry

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  • Transcript of "Wild edibles of the lowcountry"

    1. 1. Wild Edibles of the lowcountry
    2. 2. A little background...
    3. 3. A little background... Please realize that I’m not
    4. 4. A little background... Please realize that I’m not
    5. 5. A little background... Please realize that I’m not And...don’t ever eat anything you’re not 100% sure about.
    6. 6. A little background... Please realize that I’m not And...don’t ever eat anything you’re not 100% sure about.
    7. 7. This is me...as a sea turtle.
    8. 8. Wild Edibles in the LowcountryForaging for fun and education.
    9. 9. Yaupon HollyIlex Vomitoria
    10. 10. Natural History✤ Species ‘vomitoria’ misnomer✤ Only native plant in North America that contains caffeine.✤ Grows along coastal areas, but extends into the piedmont regions✤ part of the holly genus of trees.
    11. 11. Cultural History✤ Native Americans used Yaupon Holly in their purification ceremonies (Cassina Ceremony) aka Black Drink Ceremony.✤ Yaupon Holly stayed the cravings of caffeine from Boston Tea party activists.
    12. 12. Glasswortsalicornia europaea
    13. 13. Natural History✤ succulent halophytes (juicy salt-loving plants)✤ also known as sea pickle✤ turns a reddish orange color around flowering time (fall)✤ early succession in salt marshes include glasswort because of its high tolerance to salt inundation
    14. 14. Cultural History✤ Historically, glasswort was burned down to ash to make soda ash which is a key ingredient in glass and soap making.
    15. 15. American Beauty BerryCallicarpa americana
    16. 16. Natural History✤ callicarpinal, found in the leaves, is an active compound used in mosquito repellent.✤ Often the berries are used to make jelly, jam, or wine.✤ The berries, leaves and roots have also been used as remedies for colic and dropsy.
    17. 17. Cultural History✤ Native americans used Beautyberries from the roots: stomach ache and fever, from the leaves sweat baths for treatment of malaria
    18. 18. Dog Fennel Eupatorium capillifoliumDate
    19. 19. Natural History✤ Often considered a pest plant/ weed.✤ has a slight licorice odor and flavor✤ mild muscle relaxant✤ can sooth burns✤ aid in stomach ache
    20. 20. Pennywort (dollar weed)hydrocotyle sp.
    21. 21. Natural History✤ Water and shade loving✤ completely edible, just make sure to watch where you pick it up.✤ nutritious via some minerals, but otherwise good garnish or used in salads.✤ not to be mistaken for Gotu Kola, which is highly medicinal and used all over the world.
    22. 22. Gotu Kolacentella asiatica
    23. 23. Natural History✤ Used widely around the world as a well known tonic, stimulant, dieuretic, antibacterial, anti inflammatory.✤ It grows wild in SC.✤ hard to differentiate from common dollarweed/ pennywort
    24. 24. Pinepinus taeda
    25. 25. Natural History✤ High in vitamin A and C, pine needles can be cooked in water to make a refreshing, albeit, potentially strong tea.✤ Young pine cones contain tender seeds that can be eaten
    26. 26. Thank you!!!
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