L3 reforms v2

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  • SPICY
  • SPICY
  • Brought public attention to issues facing immigrants
  • Dream Act: this bill would provide conditional permanent residency to certain illegal aliens of good moral character who graduate from US high schools, arrived in the US as minors, and lived in the country continuously for at least five years prior to the bill's enactment. If they were to complete two years in the military or two years at a four year institution of higher learning, they would obtain temporary residency for a six year period. Within the six year period, they may qualify if they have "acquired a degree from an institution of higher education in the United States or has completed at least 2 years, in good standing, in a program for a bachelor's degree or higher degree in the United States" or have "served in the armed services for at least 2 years and, if discharged, has received an honorable discharge".
  • http://www.pbs.org/kenburns/prohibition/roots-of-prohibition/
  • http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/91796265/Print shows an archway of the nine steps of a drunkard's progress, beginning with a man in fancy dress having "a glass with a friend" and then his gradual decline in society with poverty & disease, criminal activity, becoming a bum, and his eventual "death by suicide"; a weeping woman with child is under archway.
  • Anti-Saloon League paper, The American Issue, with headline, "U.S. Is Voted Dry"January 25, 1919
  • Anti-Saloon League paper, The American Issue, with headline, "U.S. Is Voted Dry"January 25, 1919
  • http://www.loc.gov/pictures/resource/cph.3c23257/
  • L3 reforms v2

    1. 1. Hello! Today is 11/18/13 Notebook Paper Warm Up • What challenges did immigrants face when they moved to America? • Which do you think is the best way for immigrants to get help – settlement houses or political machines? Explain.
    2. 2. Hello! Today is 11/14/13 • Take out a piece of paper & warm up • Warm Up: Which do you think is the best way for immigrants to get help – settlement houses or political machines? Explain.
    3. 3. “The New Colossus” by Emma Lazarus Not like the brazen giant of Greek fame, With conquering limbs astride from land to land; Here at our sea-washed, sunset gates shall stand A mighty woman with a torch, whose flame Is the imprisoned lightning, and her name Mother of Exiles. From her beacon-hand Glows world-wide welcome; her mild eyes command The air-bridged harbor that twin cities frame. “"Keep, ancient lands, your storied pomp!"” cries she With silent lips. “Give me your tired, your poor, Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, The wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door!”
    4. 4. Don’t Bite the Hand That’s Feeding You • Last night, as I lay a sleeping, A wonderful dream came to me. I saw Uncle Sammy weeping For his children from over the sea; They had come to him, friendless and starving, When from tryrant's oppression they fled, But now they abuse and revile him, Till at last in just anger he said: If you don't like your Uncle Sammy, Then go back to your home o'er the sea, To the land from where you came, Whatever be it's name, But don't be ungrateful to me! If you don't like the stars in Old Glory, If you don't like the Red, White and Blue, Then don't act like the cur in the story, Don't bite the hand that's feeding you!
    5. 5. Don’t Bite the Hand That’s Feeding You • You recall the day you landed, How I welcomed you to my shore? When you came here empty handed, And allegiance forever you swore? I gathered you close to my bosom, Of food and of clothes you got both, So, when in trouble, I need you, You will have to remember your oath: If you don't like your Uncle Sammy, Then go back to your home o'er the sea, To the land from where you came, Whatever be it's name, But don't be ungrateful to me! If you don't like the stars in Old Glory, If you don't like the Red, White and Blue, Then don't act like the cur in the story, Don't bite the hand that's feeding you!
    6. 6. What we’re going to do today By the end of class, you will be able to explain the role women played in the Progressive Movement, especially the suffrage & temperance movements. Agenda: – Warm Up – Activity: Pictures – Closure: What about today?
    7. 7. Invention Project • Resources needed for industrialization • Positive & Negative impacts - Example – How does your invention make the world a better place? – How might your invention hurt the world?
    8. 8. Homework & Announcements • After School Monday • Industrialization retakes are due 11/27 - Industrial Cities Map - Invention Project * Take out your agenda!
    9. 9. SCHNIDER – U.S. History II Name: Period: Political Machines Settlement Houses • Ex: Tammany Hall • Ex: The Hull House • What was the goal of political • Who created the Hull House? Where? machines? When? • Who was the “Boss”? • What services did it provide? • How did they help immigrants? • What was the goal of settlement • houses? 1. Read through • your document 2. Take note of the KEY FACTS (who, what, where) 3. Prepare to share out to the class
    10. 10. SCHNIDER – U.S. History II Name: Period: Political Machines Settlement Houses • Ex: Tammany Hall • Ex: The Hull House • • • • • • • •
    11. 11. The Hull House • Settlement House founded by Jane Addams in Chicago • Provided services such as daycare, education and job services •Saw immigrants as victims of industrialization
    12. 12. Tammany Hall • Political machine in New York City • Helped immigrants with jobs, housing, citizensh ip • In return, immigrants voted for the Tammany candidates • Corruption (example: “Boss” Tweed) who stole millions from the government
    13. 13. Progressive Movement • All about people working to change the U.S. for the better – Examples: • Jane Addams and The Hull House • American Federation of Labor and other unions • Women were very involved in this movement in two areas: – Suffrage – Temperance
    14. 14. SCHNIDER – U.S. History II Name: Period: Suffrage Movement What was the problem? Who fought to fix it? What did they want? What did they get? What were the results? Temperance Movement
    15. 15. SCHNIDER – U.S. History II Name: Period: 3 Suffrage Movement What was the problem? Who fought to fix it? Women could not vote Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, (Fredrick Douglas, Truth) Women’s right to vote What did they want? 19th Amendment What did they get? What were the results? Women get right to vote, pathway to gender equality & Education Temperance Movement
    16. 16. Name: Period: Suffrage Movement SCHNIDER – U.S. History II Temperance Movement Who fought to fix it? Women were not allowed to vote abuse, poverty, depression, Drunkenness led to domestic violence, homelessness Susan B. Anthony Elizabeth Cady Stanton (Fredrick Douglass) Women’s Christian Temperance Union Carry Nation Voting rights for women What was the problem? Prohibit (make illegal) alcohol 19th Amendment – gave women the right to vote (1920) “the right to vote of all citizens will not be denied based on gender” 18th Amendment – making, sale or transportation of alcohol is illegal (1919) Women got power ** women got increased educational opportunities •Rise of organized crime: -Bootlegging -Mafia (gang) - Speakeasy: secret bars * 21st Amendment – repealed (undid) the 18th Amendment What did they want? What did they get? What were the results?
    17. 17. What about today? • Women’s Rights – Still unequal pay for women – Media representation – At age 7, equal number of boys & girls want to President of the U.S., by age 15 there is a massive gap emerging • Drugs & Organized Crime – Consequences of addiction – There are approximately 27,900 gangs, with 774,000 members, impacting towns, cities, and communities across the United States.
    18. 18. What about today? How do we address immigration challenges? • Private charities – Example: Hogar Immigrant Services in Falls Church, VA • DREAM Act: Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors – Residency for minors who stay out of trouble & graduate from 4-year university • Arizona Senate Bill 1070: – Immigrants have to register & carry required documents – Police must determine immigration status in all routine stops
    19. 19. Temperance
    20. 20. Temperance: Who fought? What did they want? Women's Christian Temperance Union After the Civil War, as millions of immigrants – mostly from Ireland, Germany, Italy, and other European countries – crowded into the nation's burgeoning cities, they worked hard to assimilate while simultaneously retaining cherished habits and customs from their homelands. The brewing business boomed as German-American entrepreneurs scaled up production to provide the new immigrants with millions of gallons of beer. In the 1870s, inspired by the rising indignation of Methodist and Baptist clergymen, and by distraught wives and mothers whose lives had been ruined by the excesses of the saloon, thousands of women began to protest and organize politically for the cause of temperance. Their organization, the Women's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU), became a force to be reckoned with, their cause enhanced by alliance with Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and other women battling for the vote. Its members viewed alcohol as the underlying source of a long list of social ills and found common cause with Progressives trying to ameliorate the living conditions of immigrants crowded into squalid slums, protect the rights of young children working in mills and factories, improve public education, and secure women's rights. But the WCTU's ultimate goal, a prohibition amendment to the constitution, still seemed impossibly out of reach. It would take the emergence of a new organization, the Anti-Saloon League, for the drys' dream to enter the realm of the possible. The Anti-Saloon League The goal of the ASL was a constitutional amendment that would ban the manufacture, sale and transportation of alcohol. At 12:01 A.M. on January 17, 1920, the amendment went into effect and Prohibitionists rejoiced that at long last, America had become officially, and (they hoped) irrevocably, dry. But just a few minutes later, six masked bandits with pistols emptied two freight cars full of whiskey from a rail yard in Chicago, another gang stole four casks of grain alcohol from a government bonded warehouse, and still another hijacked a truck carrying whiskey. Americans were about to discover that making Prohibition the law of the land had been one thing; enforcing it would be another.
    21. 21. Temperance: Who fought? What did they want? Women Christian Temperance Union
    22. 22. Temperance: Who fought? What did they want? Interior of saloon wrecked by Carry Nation, Enterprise, Kansas 1901 Carry Nation
    23. 23. Temperance: What was the problem?
    24. 24. Temperance illustration of drunkard hitting his wife, 1871 Temperance: What was the problem?
    25. 25. Temperance: What did they get?
    26. 26. Temperance: What did they get? 18th Amendment Section 1. After one year from the ratification of this article the manufacture, sale, or transportation of intoxicating liquors within, the importation thereof into, or the exportation thereof from the United States and all the territory subject to the jurisdiction thereof for beverage purposes is hereby prohibited.
    27. 27. Temperance: Results
    28. 28. Temperance: Results Speakeasy Bootleggers
    29. 29. Temperance: Results A dead body found in a Chicago speakeasy, 1920s Rise of organized crime (like the mafia) A policeman guards a gangland murder scene in a Cleveland restaurant, 1932 Al Capone mug shot 1931
    30. 30. Temperance: Results 21st Amendment Section 1. The eighteenth article of amendment to the Constitution of the United States is hereby repealed (reversed). Chicagoans celebrate the repeal of Prohibition at the Congress Hotel. December 8, 1933
    31. 31. Suffrage
    32. 32. Suffrage: What was the problem?
    33. 33. Suffrage: What was the problem?
    34. 34. Suffrage: Who fought to fix it? Elizabeth Cady Stanton Susan B. Anthony
    35. 35. Suffrage: What did they want?
    36. 36. Suffrage: What did they want?
    37. 37. Susan B. Anthony, 1873 Suffrage: Who fought? What did they want? Friends and fellow citizens: I stand before you tonight under indictment for the alleged crime of having voted at the last presidential election, without having a lawful right to vote. It shall be my work this evening to prove to you that in thus voting, I not only committed no crime, but, instead, simply exercised my citizen's rights, guaranteed to me and all United States citizens by the National Constitution, beyond the power of any state to deny. The preamble of the Federal Constitution says: We, the people of the United States, in order to form a more perfect union, establish justice, insure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America. It was we, the people; not we, the white male citizens; nor yet we, the male citizens; but we, the whole people, who formed the Union. And it is a downright mockery to talk to women of their enjoyment of the blessings of liberty while they are denied the use of the only means of securing them provided by this democratic-republican government - the ballot. For any state to make sex a qualification that must ever result in the disfranchisement of one entire half of the people, is to pass a bill of attainder, or, an ex post facto law, and is therefore a violation of the supreme law of the land. By it the blessings of liberty are forever withheld from women and their female posterity.
    38. 38. Suffrage: What did they get? 19th Amendment The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex [gender].
    39. 39. Suffrage: Results “The Sky is Now her Limit” Summary: Cartoon showing a woman carrying buckets on a yoke, looking up at ladder ascending up to the sky, bottom rungs labeled "Slavery," "House Drudgery," and "Shop Work." Top rungs labeled "Equal Suffrage," "Wage Equity," and "Presidency."
    40. 40. Sufferin’ til Suffrage!

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