Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
L1 immigration
L1 immigration
L1 immigration
L1 immigration
L1 immigration
L1 immigration
L1 immigration
L1 immigration
L1 immigration
L1 immigration
L1 immigration
L1 immigration
L1 immigration
L1 immigration
L1 immigration
L1 immigration
L1 immigration
L1 immigration
L1 immigration
L1 immigration
L1 immigration
L1 immigration
L1 immigration
L1 immigration
L1 immigration
L1 immigration
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

L1 immigration

537

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
537
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • http://angelislandsf.blog.com/lifeonangelisland/
  • http://www.ellisisland.org/genealogy/ellis_island_history.asp
  • One way in which newly arrived immigrants tried to provide for their own needs and those of others who had come from the same country was to stick together. Recall the tenement houses we learned about in the last lesson. Groups from the same country of origin often settled in the same tenement house. Groups of immigrants from a single country tended to settle in the same neighborhoods, creating ghettos (ethnic enclaves or ethnic neighborhoods). The remnants of such neighborhoods exist today in areas of large cities with names like “Little Italy” or “Chinatown.” While immigrants were able to use these neighborhoods to preserve their language and culture as well as to help each other adjust to the new culture, these neighborhoods were some of the poorest and most overcrowded of any area in the major cities. There were people and organizations who tried to help improve living and working conditions for newly arrived immigrants and migrants. You will be evaluating two of these methods: settlement houses and political machines.
    http://irvingashleyelonnyc.files.wordpress.com/2011/06/little-italy19001.jpeg
    http://www.gisforhistory.org/projects/immigration/
  • Cite the following reasons for the increase in immigration: Hope for better opportunities; Desire for religious freedom; Escape from oppressive governments; Desire for adventure
  • SPICY
  • MEDIUM 2
  • MEDIUM 1
  • MILD
  • Dream Act: this bill would provide conditional permanent residency to certain illegal aliens of good moral character who graduate from US high schools, arrived in the US as minors, and lived in the country continuously for at least five years prior to the bill's enactment. If they were to complete two years in the military or two years at a four year institution of higher learning, they would obtain temporary residency for a six year period. Within the six year period, they may qualify if they have "acquired a degree from an institution of higher education in the United States or has completed at least 2 years, in good standing, in a program for a bachelor's degree or higher degree in the United States" or have "served in the armed services for at least 2 years and, if discharged, has received an honorable discharge".
  • Dream Act: this bill would provide conditional permanent residency to certain illegal aliens of good moral character who graduate from US high schools, arrived in the US as minors, and lived in the country continuously for at least five years prior to the bill's enactment. If they were to complete two years in the military or two years at a four year institution of higher learning, they would obtain temporary residency for a six year period. Within the six year period, they may qualify if they have "acquired a degree from an institution of higher education in the United States or has completed at least 2 years, in good standing, in a program for a bachelor's degree or higher degree in the United States" or have "served in the armed services for at least 2 years and, if discharged, has received an honorable discharge".
  • Transcript

    • 1. Hello! Today is 11/13/13 • • Write down your homework:  On Friday (11/15): Readings: Workers, Immigrants, & Political Machines  On Friday (11/15): Vocab images • Then, begin your warm up * Take out your agenda!
    • 2. Homework & Announcements * Take out your agenda!
    • 3. Warm Up - Describe what you see in this picture. - What do you think is happening? - What questions do you have about this picture? - How do you think these people felt in this moment?
    • 4. Warm Up
    • 5. Angel Island, 1910 Angel Island, 1910 San Francisco Bay San Francisco Bay More Information More Information http://angelislandsf.blog.com/lifeonangelisland/ http://angelislandsf.blog.com/lifeonangelisland/
    • 6. Ellis Island, 1892 Ellis Island, 1892 New York New York More Information More Information http://www.ellisisland.org/genealogy/ellis_island_history.asp http://www.ellisisland.org/genealogy/ellis_island_history.asp
    • 7. Immigration to Key Cities Little Italy Little Italy Chinatown Chinatown
    • 8. One way in which newly arrived immigrants tried to provide for their own needs and those of others who had come from the same country was to stick together. Recall the tenement houses we learned about in the last lesson. Groups from the same country of origin often settled in the same tenement house. Groups of immigrants from a single country tended to settle in the same neighborhoods, creating ghettos (ethnic enclaves or ethnic neighborhoods). The remnants of such neighborhoods exist today in areas of large cities with names like “Little Italy” or “Chinatown.” While immigrants were able to use these neighborhoods to preserve their language and culture as well as to help each other adjust to the new culture, these neighborhoods were some of the poorest and most overcrowded of any area in the major cities. There were people and organizations who tried to help improve living and working conditions for newly arrived immigrants and migrants. You will be evaluating two of these methods: settlement houses and political machines. http://irvingashleyelonnyc.files.wordpress.com/2011/06/littleitaly19001.jpeg http://www.gisforhistory.org/projects/immigration/
    • 9. Name: Push Katie: famine Joseph & Mario: disease Karen & Paul: War Jacob: war The Immigrants of Industrialization Pull Jacob: Jobs Gretchen: Jobs Better pay: Joseph Gretchen: bring over rest of family Family support Karen: Education Schnider - U.S. History II Problems Over-populated: Disease Competing jobs Language barriers Communication: getting connected Social conflicts: Ethnic and racial Jobs don’t pay enough: better wage Limited shelter
    • 10. Activity: Push, Pull, Problems • Read the vignette (story) of an American Immigrant • As you read, look for: – Push (things about their home countries that motivated immigrants to leave) – Pull (things about America that motivated immigrants to come) – Problems (challenges immigrants faced) • Write down what you learn on your graphic organizer and prepare to share with the class
    • 11. Practice Together
    • 12. Name: Push Jacob: sharecropping in Ukraine Paul: World War I in Poland Joseph: Flu epidemic Karen: Bad education in Sweden The Immigrants of Industrialization Pull Timothy: Live with Dad Paul: live with Father Katie: Better life in America Schnider - U.S. History II Problems
    • 13. Name: Period: Schnider – U.S. History II Tammany Hall • • • • The Hull House • • • • 1. Read through your document 1. Read through your document 2. Take note of the KEY FACTS (who, what, where) 2. Take note of the KEY FACTS (who, what, where) 3. Prepare to share out to the class 3. Prepare to share out to the class Which method of helping immigrant communities do you think was better? Explain.
    • 14. Name: Period: • • • • Schnider – U.S. History II Tammany Hall (1830’s – 1930’s) The Hull House (1889) • Founded by Jane Addams in Chicago • Provided services such as daycare, educational classes and job services • Brought public attention to issues facing immigrants • Saw immigrants as victims of industrialization Which method of helping immigrant communities do you think was better? Explain.
    • 15. The Hull House
    • 16. Name: Period: Tammany Hall (1830’s – 1930’s) • Political organization in New York City • Helped immigrants with jobs, housing, citizenship • In return, immigrants voted for the Tammany candidates • Corruption (example: “Boss” Tweed) who stole from city construction projects Schnider – U.S. History II The Hull House (1889) • • • • Which method of helping immigrant communities do you think was better? Explain.
    • 17. Tammany Hall
    • 18. Name: Period: Tammany Hall (1830’s – 1930’s) • Political organization in New York City • Helped immigrants with jobs, housing, citizenship • In return, immigrants voted for the Tammany candidates • Corruption (example: “Boss” Tweed) who stole from city construction projects Schnider – U.S. History II The Hull House (1889) • Founded by Jane Addams in Chicago • Provided services such as daycare, educational classes and job services • Brought public attention to issues facing immigrants • Saw immigrants as victims of industrialization Which method of helping immigrant communities do you think was better? Explain.
    • 19. What about today? How do we address immigration challenges?
    • 20. What about today? How do we address immigration challenges? • Private charities – Example: Hogar Immigrant Services in Falls Church, VA • DREAM Act: Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors – Residency for minors who stay out of trouble & graduate from 4-year university • Arizona Senate Bill 1070: – Immigrants have to register & carry required documents – Police must determine immigration status in all routine stops
    • 21. Name: Schnider – U.S. History II Immigration Immigration DESCRIBE the issue: What are the key facts of this issue? Who/what/where/when/why EXPLAIN the issue: Why was this issue important? What did it mean for America? ANALYZE the issue: Compare this issue in the past to this issue in the present. Is it still an issue? How is it similar or different? EVALUATE the issue: What do you think about this issue? How should it be addressed?

    ×