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Introduction to Antennas and Radiating Systems
Introduction to Antennas and Radiating Systems
Introduction to Antennas and Radiating Systems
Introduction to Antennas and Radiating Systems
Introduction to Antennas and Radiating Systems
Introduction to Antennas and Radiating Systems
Introduction to Antennas and Radiating Systems
Introduction to Antennas and Radiating Systems
Introduction to Antennas and Radiating Systems
Introduction to Antennas and Radiating Systems
Introduction to Antennas and Radiating Systems
Introduction to Antennas and Radiating Systems
Introduction to Antennas and Radiating Systems
Introduction to Antennas and Radiating Systems
Introduction to Antennas and Radiating Systems
Introduction to Antennas and Radiating Systems
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Introduction to Antennas and Radiating Systems

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  • 1. Introduction to Antennas & Radiating Systems
    Austin Peay State University
    William Cooke
    Department of Physics & Astronomy
    J. Caleb Wherry
    Department of Computer Science
  • 2. Outline
    2
    Introduction
    What is An Antenna?
    Transmission Lines
    Free Space
    The Antenna
    How An Antenna Works
    Radiating from Accelerating Particles
    Electric and Magnetic Fields
    Radiation Patterns
    The /2 Short Dipole
    Conclusion
  • 3. Introduction
    3
  • 4. What is An Antenna?
    4
    Transmission Line/Guided Path
    A transmission line is a path in which a current flows. This line can be a typical circuit, coaxial cable, or any other material with a well-defined, complex impedance.
    Free Space
    Free space is made up of fields and void of other matter. These fields carry energy in the form of waves which can travel freely throughout.
    Antenna
    An antenna is the interface between the above transmission lines and free space. It takes the current from the transmission lines and converts it to waves which get transmitted into free space, and vice versa.
  • 5. How An Antenna Works
    5
  • 6. How An Antenna Works
    6
  • 7. How An Antenna Works
    7
    Image Source:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dipole
  • 8. Field Patterns
    8
  • 9. Field Pattern Lobes
    9
    HPBW: half power beam width
  • 10. Power Pattern
    10
    Main lobe axis
    Main lobe
    Back lobes
    Minor lobes
  • 11.  
    11
  • 12.  
    12
    Retarded Current distance z away from poles:
    Integrating over all dz’s to get E & H components of far field:
    z
    dz
  • 13.  
    13
    We can then find the Power by integrating the above field over a large surface of the Poynting vector:
    Radiation Resistance:
  • 14. Conclusion
    14
    Antennas are all around us! Examples listed here are only a small subset of a rich field of study.
    Antennas’ shape are of great importance in the theory of transmission and receiving of antennas (Optimization theory – Genetic Algorithms).
    A better understanding of how antennas work gives us an understanding of the electromagnetic radiation into or out of our electronic device.
    Enjoy your summer!
  • 15. References
    15
    Griffiths, D.J. Introduction to Electrodynamics. 3rd ed. Prentice-Hall: Upper Saddle River, NJ. 1999.
    Kraus, J.D. Antennas. 2nd ed. McGraw-Hill: New York.1988.
  • 16. Questions &| Comments
    16
    Questions &| Comments?

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