Scale models

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Scale models

  1. 1. Agenda<br />Turn in completed concept board with rubric and reflection filled out by the end of the day today<br />Scale Model Notes and Blog Questions<br />Begin working scale model<br />Worktime<br />Next Class: More scale models<br />Homework: Posting Homework Assignment and Scale Model questions due next class!<br />
  2. 2. Unit 3: Professional Practices and Client Communication<br />SCALE MODELING<br />
  3. 3. Scale Models<br />Definition: a representation or copy of an object that is larger or smaller than the actual size of the object <br />Most often the scale model is smaller than the original and used as a guide to making the object in full size<br />
  4. 4. Purpose<br />Allows designers to study the volume of a given space<br />Models reveal the 3-d qualities of a form<br />Provide designers opportunities to study and review the elements of a design<br />
  5. 5. Scale Model: Visual Information<br />Finishes<br />Materials<br />Colors<br />Textures<br />All information presented in accurate scale<br />
  6. 6. Model Makers<br />Working models are often created by the interior designer or architect<br />Presentation models are often created by full-time model markers on staff or professional model making companies<br />Professionals have a wider variety of materials to build with including molds; saws and laser cutters<br />
  7. 7. Types of Scale Models<br />Study Model/Working Models: quickly constructed to reflect the preliminary nature of the design<br />Presentation/Finished Models: present a finalized, fully developed design with a great deal of detail and high levels of craftsmanship<br />
  8. 8. Working Scale Model<br />Components<br />Floor plans as a base<br />Interior elevations rendered onto the walls<br />Elevations attached to the floor plan<br />Can be glued into place to be permanent<br />Can be hinged with a strip of tape for flipping up and down to allow easy transportation<br />
  9. 9. Working Scale Model<br />Advantages <br />Elevations can moved and taped into place as needed for study and review<br />Uses drawing skills as an aid in model making<br />Can be dismantled and stored flat for easy transportation<br />Limitations<br />Does not show design details as accurately as presentation models<br />Less realistic in terms of space than presentation models<br />
  10. 10. Presentation Scale Model<br />Components<br />Accurate representation of walls; flooring; ceilings and furniture:<br />Textures<br />Materials<br />Finishes<br />Colors<br />
  11. 11. Presentation Scale Model<br />Advantages<br />Shows design details such as finishes; colors; materials; textures<br />Gives a highly accurate representation of the space<br />Limitations<br />Costly to create<br />Time intensive<br />Requires expensive tools<br />Most often created by model making teams of professionals<br />
  12. 12. Choosing Your Model – Working Model<br />Decide on its purpose<br />For study and refinement of an in-progress design – create a study model<br />To communicate the function of a space – create a study model so that details don’t become the focus of the model<br />
  13. 13. Choosing Your Model – Presentation Models<br />Decide on its purpose<br />To present a fully developed design to a client – create a presentation model<br />Publicly funded projects require presentation models to gain public approval or funding from investors – must consider the audience carefully and model must work to carefully communicate the design<br />
  14. 14. Our Scale Models<br />You will be making 2 scale models of a section of your apartment<br />One working model of your entire apartment<br />One presentation model of 2 to 3 rooms of your apartment<br />
  15. 15. Step 1: Floor Plan Base<br />Using a pencil and a ruler, lightly trace the floor plan of your apartment - both interior and exterior walls and furniture onto Bristol Board.<br />Trace over the doors and windows but don’t worry about coloring them or adding in the swing of the doors<br />You do not need to trace the graph paper lines<br />You do not need to label anything<br />Cut out your exterior walls using a ruler and X-acto knife – make sure to cut atop something else – not just the desk!<br />
  16. 16. Starting Your Working Model – Step 2: Wall Numbering<br />Assign a number, in pencil, next to each wall of your apartment<br />Assign the same number, very lightly in pencil, next to the same walls of your floor plan<br />This will help make assembly easier<br />
  17. 17. Step 3: Exterior Walls <br />Determine the width and height of the exterior walls you’ll need for each part of the room<br />Use ¼”: 1’ scale<br />Width should be exactly the same as what’s on your floor plan base plus an extra ¼” of width to the walls on one side (right or left) to allow for tabs for assembly<br />Add an extra ¼” of height on the bottom of the walls to allow for assembly<br />Height varies with design. Average residential ceiling height is 8’. <br />Cut the walls from Bristol Board using a ruler and X-acto knife<br />Lightly score the extra ¼” on the side and bottom to allow for easy folding<br />NOTE: if you have angled walls or some small walls, create them by marking and scoring the fold mark, disregarding the extra ¼” on the side<br />
  18. 18. Step 4: Interior Walls<br />Determine the width and height of the interior walls you’ll need for each part of the room<br />Use ¼”: 1’ scale<br />Width should be exactly the same as what’s on your floor plan base plus an extra ¼” on one side (either the right or the left) to allow for tabs for assembly <br />Add on an extra ¼” to the height on the bottom of the walls to allow for assembly<br />Height varies with design. Average residential ceiling height is 8’. <br />Cut the walls from Bristol Board using a ruler and X-acto knife<br />Score the extra ¼” on the bottom and side for easy folding<br />Note: If you have any half walls, make sure to reflect this by cutting away the appropriate amount of wall<br />NOTE: if you have angled walls or some small walls, create them by marking and scoring the fold mark, disregarding the extra ¼” on the side<br />
  19. 19. Step 5: Creating Notches<br />Cut a small notch on the vertical axis of where the extra ¼” side and extra ¼” bottom meet<br />This will help these two to fold together to form a corner which the other walls can rest into<br />
  20. 20. Step 6: Temporary Assembly<br />Temporarily assemble your working model to see how the pieces fit together<br />Fold the extra ¼” left at the bottoms of the walls and sides of the walls as tabs to allow for taping to your floor plan base and to other walls.<br />Tape everything into place using masking tape <br />Remove some of the tackiness from your tape by using it on your clothing before applying to the Bristol board<br />
  21. 21. Step 7:Marking in Doors, Windows and Built-Ins<br />Determine the location; width and height of the doors, windows and built-ins including bookcases; fireplaces and shelves on your interior and exterior walls of your floor plan<br />Use ¼”: 1’ scale<br />Refer to your floor plan for reference <br />Average door height ranges from 6’8” to 9’<br />Average window height varies depending on how high you want your windows to be<br />Refer to reference packet for more door and window sizes<br />Keep in mind what is on interior walls as well as exterior walls<br />
  22. 22. Step 8: Drawing in Doors; Windows and Built-Ins<br />Disassemble your scale model<br />Use a ruler and pencil to draw in your doors, windows and built ins<br />Add in all details including hinges; doorknobs; window panes; views outside of windows; books and objects in bookcases and shelves; etc.<br />Draw lightly in pencil. We will be adding color and value with materials later on<br />
  23. 23. Step 9: Floor Plan Painting<br />On the floor plan base, create the texture/material/finish of the furniture and floor using watercolor paints<br />If you have carpets, rugs or anything special on the floor in the room draw them in at this point<br />Make sure to keep in mind where the interior walls are if your rooms have different flooring materials<br />
  24. 24. Step 9: Floor Plan Painting<br />
  25. 25. Step 9: Floor Plan Painting<br />
  26. 26. Step 10: Wall Painting<br />On the walls, create the texture/material/finish of the walls as well as anything that is hanging on them<br />-Paint in the texture and materials of doors and windows at this time<br />
  27. 27. Step 11: Assembly<br />Re-assemble your working model when all pieces are dry<br />Temporarily hold pieces in place with masking tape (making sure to remove the tackiness before applying to the paper)<br />When everything is arranged as you want it to be, permanently glue the pieces together with a glue stick or tacky glue, making sure to avoid messy glue marks and globs<br />
  28. 28. Step 12: Rubric and Reflection<br />Fill out your rubric by making a comment in a complete sentence in at least one box and circle a number for each category<br />Answer the reflection questions on the back of your rubric in complete sentences, using the language of art<br />1. What was successful about your working model<br />2. What did you struggle with while creating your working model?<br />3. What have your learned from creating your working model that will help you create your professional model?<br />

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