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Program and diagramming

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Program creation; Adjacency studies and Bubble Diagrams; Measuring; Scale; Area

Program creation; Adjacency studies and Bubble Diagrams; Measuring; Scale; Area

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  • 1. + Agenda  Warm-Up  Unit 2: Planning the Space  Homework: Program Worksheet  Finish General Project Statement  Finish Program Survey  At least 5 images for Program Survey  Due Today:  Workbooks 2 and 3  Please write Workbook 2 and save some space and Workbook 3 on your bookmark; tuck into workbook where your work is located and turn into me to be graded.
  • 2. + Warm Up #5  This is the Coconut Chair designed by George Nelson. I’d like you to design the Banana Chair, using the same approach to design that George Nelson did for his coconut chair.
  • 3. + Unit 2: Planning the Space
  • 4. + Program Worksheet #1: Answer these questions to ‘design your clients’  Answer the questions to Workbook #4 on the worksheet provided to you.  1. What type of person/people will be living in this apartment?  List the ages of people living in the apartment  Describe their occupation(s)  Each person's hobbies and interests  How often are they using the apartment? (Do they travel often or have a vacation home?  Work long hours? Stay home often?)  How often do they entertain others in the apartment?  Do they have pets and if so what kind and how many?  2. What geographic location would want the apartment you are designing to be in? (Name a city and state or city and country)  3. List 5 adjectives that would describe the mood you'd like to create in the apartment.
  • 5. + Planning Process (for a new space)  Create Program: General Project Statement and Survey  Bubble Diagram  Block Diagram  Create Adjacency Study  Circulation Diagram  Room Requirements Survey  Floor Plan Drawing  Evaluate the Plan  Orthographic Drawing  Elevation Drawing
  • 6. + Planning Process (for an existing space)  Gather Information from Client  Analyze and Evaluate the Space  Create Program: : General Project Statement and Survey  Block Diagram  Circulation Diagram  Room Requirements Survey  Furniture and Fixtures Assessment  Floor Plan Drawing  Evaluate the Plan  Orthographic Drawing  Elevation Drawing
  • 7. + Project #1: Apartment You must use your design skills to plan a brand new apartment for between 1 and 3 people. Must contain:  A bedroom  A kitchen  Living room  Dining room  Bathroom  A patio or balcony (depending on what floor you live on )
  • 8. + Please follow along in your notes and fill out the information for your project.  Step 1: Program  Definition: a written document of objectives and requirements about the project. Necessary to ensure client and designer share a common point of view about their goals for the space  Program information includes:  Kinds and numbers of rooms/spaces to be designed  Relationships between the different rooms/spaces  Specific needs for storage/special furniture/equipment
  • 9. + Program Components General Project Statement  1 or 2 sentences outlining the extent of work to be done and the purpose of the space Survey  A collection of specific details abut the client’s requirements for the space. Collected through discussion with the client and examination of the space
  • 10. + Program Components – General Project Statement  General Project Statement  1 or 2 sentences outlining the extent of work to be done and the purpose of the space.  Ex: Franklin Square is an apartment for an urban married couple in a newly constructed building Franklin Square – title of project Apartment for an urban married couple – purpose of the space Newly constructed building – extent of work to be done
  • 11. + Program Components – General Project Statement Locate the project title; purpose of the space and extent of work to be done in the statement below Bay Park Drive is a re-design of the first floor entryway and kitchen for a lawyer’s suburban single–family home
  • 12. + Program Components – General Project Statement  Locate the project title; purpose of the space and extent of work to be done in the statement below  Bay Park Drive is a re-design of the first floor entryway and kitchen for a lawyer’s suburban single–family home Bay Park Drive – title of project Suburban single-family home – purpose of space Re-design of first floor entryway and kitchen – extent of work to be done
  • 13. + Program Components – General Project Statement Locate the project title; purpose of the space and extent of work to be done in the statement below Central Square is a re-design of the clubhouse dining room of the Central Square Country Club
  • 14. + Program Components – General Project Statement  Locate the project title; purpose of the space and extent of work to be done in the statement below  Central Square is a re-design of the clubhouse dining room of the Central Square Country Club Central Square– title of project Central Square Country Club dining room– purpose of space Re-design of clubhouse dining room– extent of work to be done
  • 15. + Program Components – General Project Statement Fill out the General Project Statement information and write the statement on your worksheet. Include:  title of the project  purpose of the space  extent of work to be done
  • 16. + Program Components – Survey  Survey  A collection of specific details abut the client’s requirements for the space  Collected through discussion with the client and examination of the space  Survey Information:  Data on activities and processes taking place in the space  Specific needs of the people using the space  Space and furniture requirements  Privacy requirements  Noise requirements  Visual requirements
  • 17. + Let’s brainstorm questions to ask your client for your program’s survey component Think about:  Specific needs of the people living in the space  Data on activities and processes taking place in the space  Space and Furniture Requirements  Privacy Requirements  Noise Requirements  Visual Requirements Program Components – Survey
  • 18. + Program Components – Survey Questions for Clients  Entertaining?  Bed Time?  Cooking and Dining?  Play Time?  Exercise Time?  Storage Needs?  Growth of the Family – as everyone grows/leaves home/becomes elderly
  • 19. + Program Survey Questionnaire  For homework, due next class:  Part 1:fill out the program survey questionnaire as though you are the client of your apartment project  DO NOT answer it as yourself. Remember – you’ve designed your clients on your worksheet, imagine you are them. Think about their likes/dislikes/interests.  The information you provide will be used to start designing your client’s apartment  Part 2: Imagine you are the client (the apartment owner) and you’ve been asked by the designer to find images from the Internet; photographs and magazines that show the style you like.  Find at least 5 images that your client would choose to communicate the style/feel they would like the designer to use as inspiration in the apartment design. Make sure to remember all of the answers the client created in the Program Survey Questionnaire when looking for images.  Ex: Don’t find an image of a huge kitchen with lots of working areas if the client said they eat out at restaurants most nights of the week.
  • 20. + Warm Up #6 (this will be a 2 day warm-up) Sketchbooks are on my cart Design a child’s bed – inspired by a fairytale; fable or myth. Please write down what the fairytale; fable or myth is next to your drawing
  • 21. + Agenda Room List Adjacency Study Furniture Inventory Homework: Furniture Inventory due Wednesday
  • 22. + Room List  Title an area in your Sketchbook as Unit 2: Planning  Sub-Title the page ‘Room List’  Get out your Program Survey  Make a list of all of the spaces you will need in your apartment, according to the Program Survey  Living Room  Dining Room  Master Bedroom  Bathroom  Kitchen  Patio or Balcony  Closets and Storage  Whatever else you need – additional bedrooms; bathrooms; closets; workrooms; etc.
  • 23. +
  • 24. + Adjacency Study Matrix  Adjacency Study: an evaluation of the closeness of spaces from close to far apart  After knowing the number and type of rooms you have we must determine the relationship of rooms within the space to one another  What rooms should be next to one another  What are the client’s needs for proximity of space  Ex: Kitchen next to Dining Room  Ex: Bathroom next to Master Bedroom  To do this we need to create a matrix to value the nearness between spaces
  • 25. + Adjacency Study  Sub-title this section in your Sketchbook as: Adjacency Study: Project Title; Date  Construct a matrix like the one to the right – use a ruler to help you - with all of your rooms for the apartment project listed along both the side and the top of the chart. Keep them in the same order on both sides  Note: your rooms are different from the ones shown! Refer to your room list you just created!  Color code your adjacency study using the colored pencils
  • 26. + Adjacency Study  Copy down the legend/key to the matrix shown in the upper left hand corner of the drawing  Keeping in mind the client’s program; evaluate the relationship between spaces, moving your way from box to box across the matrix  Fill in the answer to the box with the key you’ve created  No relationship: there is no reason for the spaces to be near one another  Some relationship: there is a bit of reason for spaces to be near one another but don’t need to be right next to each other  Critical relationship: extremely important for spaces to be right next to one another  For spaces that are the same (living room to living room) leave blank
  • 27. +
  • 28. + Furniture Inventory  Furniture Inventory: A list of all the necessary furniture; storage and built-in objects needed in a space. Secondary information such as size; shape; color and style is also provided.  Purpose: Necessary for ensuring new-designed spaces are sized appropriately to accommodate furniture and storage necessities listed in the Program.  MUST refer to the Program survey to ensure designer is covering everything the client wants/needs  Storage  Entertaining  Sleeping  Relaxing  Display of Objects  Seating Areas  Built-Ins
  • 29. + Warm Up #6 continued Continue with your previous warm up – creating a child’s bed inspired by a famous story; fairytale; fable or myth. Add color if you time.
  • 30. + Agenda  Review Adjacency Study and Furniture Inventory  Bubble Diagrams  Measuring  Homework: Final Bubble Diagram
  • 31. + Next Steps: Bubble Diagram  Bubble Diagram – A sketch of different rooms within a space, represented by circles.  Purpose: encourages designer to explore various design solutions  Size of the circle indicates the hierarchy of importance of the room – the bigger the circle the larger the room  Acts as an outline for your plans to be developed later– almost like an outline for an essay  Used to experiment with design possibilities– don’t worry about specifics but rather the overall design concept
  • 32. + Bubble Diagrams can be technical
  • 33. + Or artistic
  • 34. + Bubble Diagram  What is the most important space according to this bubble diagram?  What do you think the different colors are used for?
  • 35. + Bubble-Diagram: Getting Started  Have your program (general project statement and survey) as well as your furniture inventory next to you to review before you draw  Sub-title an area in your sketchbook as Bubble Diagram; Project Title; Date  ON THE SEPARATE PAPER Begin sketching and labeling various size bubbles for each space in your apartment – the size of bubble coordinating with the size of the room.  Don’t worry yet about where the bubbles are located in relationship to one another – make sure to spread them out so that there is space between each one  Color the spaces according to their use, assigning a color to each of the different categories below. Make sure to write what the key is to the colors.  Public Space  Private Space  Workspace  Storage
  • 36. +
  • 37. + Bubble Diagram – Link Lines  Link lines help show the relationships between spaces after you have an idea of where  When creating link lines on your diagram, refer to your adjacency study  = critical relationship  = some relationship  = no relationship  Goal is to make the heaviest lines as short as possible so people do not need to travel very far between critical relationship spaces – this means you may need to re-arrange the bubble diagram a bit
  • 38. + Bubble Diagram – Link Lines  Cut out or-re-draw your bubbles from your bubble diagram  Arrange them according to your adjacency study in the area you sub-titled in your sketchbook  When you figured out where you think they need to be indicate the levels of adjacency of the different spaces by using link lines in pencil  = critical relationship  = some relationship  = no relationship  Goal is to make the heaviest lines as short as possible so people do not need to travel very far between critical relationship spaces – this means you may need to re-arrange the bubble diagram a bit  When you’ve arrived at the best solution, glue into place in your sketchbook  Remember – this isn’t a floor plan yet – it’s a visual outline for you to understand how rooms will relate to one another
  • 39. + Sample Link Lines
  • 40. + Sample Link Lines
  • 41. +
  • 42. + Bubble Diagram Do’s and Don’ts  DO experiment with overall shapes and decide whether you want the design to be formal or informal  DO be willing to do several different bubble diagrams to arrive at the best solution  DO make it a clean; attractive drawing – it is meant as a visual aid for the design process so make it something you and your client will understand  DON’T forget the program when developing the different ‘bubbles’ for your clients. Refer to the general project statement and survey before drawing  DON’T get too specific while drawing the “bubble” diagrams. Getting too specific too soon makes you forget that there are other design possibilities available for the design
  • 43. + Final Copy Bubble Diagram - Homework  Create an artistic quality final copy of your bubble diagram  Re-draw a final copy on the drawing paper and title with:  Bubble Diagram for YOUR PROJECT TITLE  Your first and last name;  Date  Draw in pencil; then ink over with a Sharpie pen  Make sure to label the rooms neatly in capitol letters  Draw arrows to show the connection links between rooms like you previously did – thicker the arrow stronger the connection  Color with colored pencils, creating a color for each of the categories below. Make sure to include a key for it  Public Space  Private Space  Workspace  Storage
  • 44. + Block Diagram – for new spaces only!  A drawing where each room of the project is drawn to scale and in the shape the room will be  Before we create our block diagram we have to learn how to measure and gain a rough idea of what different sizes look like
  • 45. + Size  In America we measure using English units  Feet  Inches  MEMORIZE!  There are 12 inches in 1 foot  Inches can be broken down into  1/2 inch  1/4 inch  1/8 inch  1/16 inch  1/32 inch  ‘ symbolizes feet, “ symbolizes inches  In Interior Design  we measure spaces in combinations of feet and inches  Ex: 5’ 10’’  Ex: 5’ 12” – what is wrong with this measurement?
  • 46. + Understanding Measuring  Normally 2 sides to a ruler or tape measure  1/8 inch ruler  1/16 inch ruler  On your ruler locate the 1/8 inch side and measure and draw 1 inch in your notes. Label as 1 inch.
  • 47. + Understanding Measuring  Measure and draw a second inch in your notes and label as ½ inch  Label off the ½ inch mark
  • 48. + Understanding Measuring  Measure and draw a third inch in your notes and label as ¼ inch  Label off the 1/4 inches in your notes
  • 49. + Understanding Measuring  Measure and draw a fourth inch in your notes and label as 1/8 inch  Label off the 1/8th inches in your notes
  • 50. + Understanding Measuring  Now switch to the 1/16ths side of the ruler. Measure and draw a fifth inch in your notes and label as 1/16 inch  Label off the 1/16th inches in your notes
  • 51. + Practice  When marking down a distance from a ruler, mark the whole inch, followed by a space, then the fraction of an inch. Reduce your fractions down to the least common denominator. Make sure to mark with the appropriate units!  Ex: 1 ½”, or 2 3/8 ”  Ex: 1 4/8” converts to 1 ½”  Practice measuring the grey lines on the top part of your Measuring Worksheet.  Let’s do the first two together
  • 52. + Practice  1. Measure in 1/16ths  2. Measure in 1/8ths
  • 53. + Practice  1.  2.
  • 54. + Measuring Squares and Rectangles To measure a square or rectangle (most common room shapes) you need to take two measurements  Length and Width  Represented as L and W  Typically this is expressed with the length first  Ex: A rectangle that is 24” wide by 30” long is expressed as 30”L x 24”W
  • 55. + Practice Measuring Squares and Rectangles  Use the rulers to measure the squares and rectangles on your practice worksheet numbered 21 to 25  Measure to the nearest 1/16 inch  Let’s do number 1 together
  • 56. + Area  Area is the extent of a 2-dimensional surface enclosed within a boundary  Calculated for a square or rectangle by length multiplied by width  Represented by square of a length unit (ex: square feet; square inches)  Ex: The dining room has an area of 50 square feet  Area is represented on a drawing through the use of scale
  • 57. +  Scale: the ratio between the size of something and a representation of it  There are a variety of scales to use:  1”: 1’ (1 inch on a drawing represents 1 foot of physical space)  ½” :1’  ¼”: 1’  Most interior designers use a ¼” :1’ scale. Conveniently, our graph paper has ¼” square blocks on it – therefore 1 square represents 1 foot of physical space  When making a drawing that is to scale, it is of utmost importance to write the scale on the drawing so that the viewer understands what size it represents  On your graph paper, use a ruler to draw a room with the dimensions below in ¼” : 1’ scale. Don’t forget to write the scale!  8 feet by 9 feet  15 feet by 17.5 feet  96 inches by 120 inches Scale