Greek

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Greek

  1. 1. Agenda Greek Art Discussion Introduce Research Portion of Greek project Start Greek Project Research OR Finish sarcophagus; rubric; reflection; accession certificate NOTE: If you choose to work on your sarcophagus; it would be a good idea to complete the Greek research at home tonight. Use the blog for directions New due date for sarcophagus – November 15th for AC; 16th for BD
  2. 2. Art of the Greek Empire: 500 B.C.E. to 300 B.C.E
  3. 3. What do we know about the Ancient Greek Empire?
  4. 4. Art of Greek Empire 500 B.C.E - 300 B.C.E. Civilization that excelled in architecture, poetry, drama, philosophy and logic Remembered for being intellectual and artistic Polytheistic - believed in many Gods. Centered around the 12 Olympian Gods Most Greek governments were democracies – citizens voted for themselves, had a say in running their country Art stressed harmony (all parts working together), order (everything organized in an appropriate place) and balance
  5. 5. Ideal Beauty What do you think ideal beauty was to the Greeks? What kind of subject matter (the topic being shown in a work of art) would show ideal beauty? Who do you think exemplified ideal beauty in Greek art?
  6. 6. Art of the Greek Empire 500 B.C.E - 300 B.C.E. POTTERY AND PAINTING: Vase and urn painting Tell stories of Greek Gods and Heroes of myths Story reads around the vase, almost like a comic Most vases and urns were functional: used for holding food, water, cosmetics, oil and perfume
  7. 7. Art of the Greek Empire 500 B.C.E - 300 B.C.E. POTTERY AND PAINTING: Time period the vase was made determined by the method the artist used to paint on the pictures Did not use symbolism like the Egyptians, instead created imagery to please the eye with ideal beauty – particularly beautiful people in athletic or leisure activities with Greek motifs in a bold, graphic style
  8. 8. Greek Vase Styles
  9. 9. Art of Greek Empire 500 B.C.E - 300 B.C.E.
  10. 10. Art of Greek Empire 500 B.C.E - 300 B.C.E. SCULPTURE: realistic marble statues, painted over- with colored paints - Invented the use of nudity in art - Ideal proportions in statues: symbolize perfection of body and mind the Greeks worked towards possessing -First to create sculptures that look like they are moving and have emotion -
  11. 11. Art of Greek Empire 500 B.C.E - 300 B.C.E.
  12. 12. Greek? WHY? Which follows the law of frontality? Why one shows dynamic movement?
  13. 13. Art of Greek Empire 500 B.C.E - 300 B.C.E. Work to Know: The Discus Thrower, Bronze, 450 B.C.E
  14. 14. Art of Greek Empire 500 B.C.E - 300 B.C.E. ARCHITECTURE: Known for temples and monuments dedicated to their gods and goddesses Greek architecture influenced every Western culture’s architecture to follow (Roman, Medieval European, Italian, English, French, American, etc.)
  15. 15. Art of Greek Empire 500 B.C.E - 300 B.C.E.
  16. 16. Art of Greek Empire 500 B.C.E - 300 B.C.E. ARCHITECTURE: Pediments: triangular architectural element supported by columns, often filled with sculptures
  17. 17. Art of Greek Empire 500 B.C.E - 300 B.C.E. ARCHITECTURE: Columns: vertical structural element that divides the weight of the structure above to other structural elements below
  18. 18. Art of Greek Empire 500 B.C.E - 300 B.C.E. ORDERS: organizational system for ancient Greek architecture. Three orders: Doric, Ionic, Corinthian Each order is associated with a different style of Greek architecture Columns in the orders are all composed of three pieces: capitol (top), shaft, (center); base (bottom).
  19. 19. Art of Greek Empire 500 B.C.E - 300 B.C.E. Doric: oldest architecture: plain and simple, thick and bulky
  20. 20. Art of Greek Empire 500 B.C.E - 300 B.C.E. Ionic:, has scrolls in capitol, a little fancier and more decorative than Doric, thin
  21. 21. Art of Greek Empire 500 B.C.E - 300 B.C.E. Corinthian: fanciest, ornate carvings of leaves, grapes and flowers in capitol, skinny
  22. 22. Art of Greek Empire 500 B.C.E - 300 B.C.E. Work to Know: Doric, Ionic and Corinthian Column Orders
  23. 23. Art of Greek Empire 500 B.C.E - 300 B.C.E. Work to Know: The Parthenon, Marble, 480 B.C.E
  24. 24. Art of Greek Empire 500 B.C.E - 300 B.C.E.
  25. 25. Art of Greek Empire 500 B.C.E - 300 B.C.E. Work to Know: The Parthenon, Marble, 480 B.C.E
  26. 26. Art of Greek Empire 500 B.C.E - 300 B.C.E. Work to Know: The Parthenon, Marble, 480 B.C.E
  27. 27. Art of Greek Empire 500 B.C.E - 300 B.C.E. Work to Know: The Parthenon, Marble, 480 B.C.E
  28. 28. Art of Greek Empire 500 B.C.E - 300 B.C.E. Work to Know: The Parthenon, Marble, 480 B.C.E
  29. 29. Hands On: Greek Art Your Task: Create a drawing of traditional Greek pottery with ancient Greek design motifs, Ancient Greek patterns and a drawing depicting a scene from Ancient Greek mythology inspired by a Greek sculpture Materials: Sharpie marker on paper Skills Learned: How to draw human body Concepts: Ancient Greek design motifs; improving drawing skills;
  30. 30. How Are We Going to Do This? Research a Greek myth Find a Greek sculpture that fits with your myth Learn how to draw human figures from a photograph Draw your sculpture using the method we learned in class Embellish your myth with background, other figures, etc. Add onto your vase with Ancient Greek Patterns and Motifs
  31. 31. Greek Research Follow the Greek Vase Drawing and Project Directions sheet in the class binders to complete your research
  32. 32. Art Rx Name this Greek Work to Know List 2 Greek architectural elements it possesses
  33. 33. Agenda How to draw human figure lesson Worktime: Greek vase or sarcophagus Sarcophagus; rubric; reflection questions and accession certificate due November 15th AC; November 16th BD
  34. 34. Drawing the Human Figure Common Mistakes: Focusing on the details of the figure, rather than the person underneath Telling yourself that it doesn’t look ‘right’ Stopping a drawing when it isn’t looking ‘right.’ You’ll learn more by continuing to work through it #1 Tip to Drawing: DON’T TALK! Scientific fact that talking inhibits your ability to draw! Listening to soft, low music is proven to help your drawing
  35. 35. Getting Started: Drawing Humans In your sketchbook – label an area as ‘Human Figure’ Examine the picture to the right What does it look like the person is doing? How can you tell?
  36. 36. Which drawing shows action? How does it show action?
  37. 37. Lines of Action Horizontal and Vertical Lines imply inaction and rest
  38. 38. Lines of Action Diagonal Lines (lines on an incline) indicate action or unrest
  39. 39. In Your Sketchbook: Please draw lines of inaction Please draw lines of action
  40. 40. Drawing the Human Figure: Lines of Action Simplify the form to its most simplest – essentially just one or two lines to show how the figure is posed
  41. 41. Drawing the Human Figure: Forms Simple lines to show pose of the figure
  42. 42. Drawing the Human Figure: Forms
  43. 43. Drawing the Human Figure: Stick Figure After drawing your lines of action - imagine your body is divided up into ovals Head Ribcage Pelvis
  44. 44. Drawing the Human Figure: Stick Figure A common mistake: lumping the ribcage and pelvis into one oval
  45. 45. Drawing the Human Figure: Stick Figure Separating the ribcage and pelvis into two ovals is VERY IMPORTANT!
  46. 46. Drawing the Human Figure: Pivot Points Using a marker; mark off the pivot points – imaginary centers of movement within the body. Connect the pivot points and ovals with lines to form
  47. 47. Drawing the Human Figure: Ovals
  48. 48. Let’s Practice: Line of Action
  49. 49. Let’s Practice: Add in head; ribcage and pelvis ovals
  50. 50. Let’s Practice: Add the pivot points (centers of movements)
  51. 51. Let’s Practice: Connect the pivot points with lines to ovals and add in hands/feet
  52. 52. Let’s Practice: Line of Action
  53. 53. Let’s Practice: Line of Action
  54. 54. Let’s Practice: Add head; ribcage and pelvis ovals
  55. 55. Let’s Practice: Add head; ribcage and pelvis ovals
  56. 56. Let’s Practice: Add pivot points
  57. 57. Let’s Practice: Add pivot points
  58. 58. Let’s Practice: Connect pivot points and add hands/feet ovals
  59. 59. Let’s Practice: Connect pivot points and add hands/feet ovals
  60. 60. Keep in Mind: Balance and Equilibrium Keep in mind how the human body balances when drawing figures. Ask yourself – does this look like a person could pose this way?
  61. 61. Keep in Mind: Balance and Equilibrium
  62. 62. Try the steps on your own to draw this figure in action
  63. 63. Try the steps on your own to draw this figure in action
  64. 64. Try the steps on your own to draw this figure in action
  65. 65. Next Steps: Adding Weight to Figures Adding forms such as spheres and cylinders atop your skeleton will help draw more realistic humans Let’s learn how by starting with just an arm
  66. 66. Practice: Arm Draw the basic pivot points
  67. 67. Practice: Arm Connect the pivot points
  68. 68. Practice: Arm Add on forms to show the different pieces to the arm
  69. 69. Practice: Arm Refine your drawing by using your photograph/mode l as a reference to make it more realistic Examine the muscle; tendon or clothing
  70. 70. Let’s Practice We want this to be our outcome Start with the line of action Add head; ribcage and pelvis ovals Add in pivot points Connect and
  71. 71. Let’s Practice Start to refine the lines by adding in shapes
  72. 72. Let’s Practice Refine the drawing even more by examining the muscle structure
  73. 73. Project: Refine and add in extras and details This takes years of practice so don’t get frustrated! Keep trying!
  74. 74. Get from this to this:
  75. 75. Hands On: Greek Art Your Task: Create a drawing of traditional Greek pottery with ancient Greek design motifs, Ancient Greek patterns and a drawing depicting a scene from Ancient Greek mythology inspired by a Greek sculpture Materials: Sharpie marker on paper Skills Learned: How to draw human body Concepts: Ancient Greek design motifs; improving drawing skills;
  76. 76. Using Your Sculpture Refer to the directions in the binder from the Greek Vase Drawing Directions from #6 onwards
  77. 77. No shading! Just a simple contour line drawing to show the edges of forms You may clothe your sculpture if
  78. 78. Greek Myth Vase Paintings
  79. 79. Greek Myth Vase Paintings
  80. 80. Rest of Day Finish your myth and sculpture research – use the handout in the art binders for help Begin drawing your story on the same paper you researched on then show me before you go onto the next step Work on sarcophagus if you choose – note that this puts you
  81. 81. Art Rx What is the name of this particular order of Greek Column? Doric; Ionic or Corinthian? What visual clues in the picture helped you arrive at your answer?
  82. 82. Art RX Explain the Ancient Greek idea of ideal beauty and its impact on Greek sculpture.
  83. 83. Art RX Explain the stylistic differences between Egyptian sculptures and Ancient Greek sculptures.

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