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Presentation given at JTEL2012 (Joint European Summer school on Technology Enhanced Learning) ...

Presentation given at JTEL2012 (Joint European Summer school on Technology Enhanced Learning)

Event URL: http://www.prolearn-academy.org/Events/summer-school-2012

My contact email: caislas@gmail.com

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2012 JTEL - Workshop: Basics of Game Design Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Basics of Game Design by Carolina Islas Sedano PhD student at the University of Eastern FinlandSunday, 27 May 2012
  • 2. About me... My academic background 1. BSc Electronic Engineering in Mexico Source image 2. MSc. 3. PhD. Communication Educational and Media Technologies Engineering Research Group in Germany 2 in Finlandcarolina islas sedano Source image JTELSS, 2012Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 3. Workshop assumptions • (i) everybody has played games Technology • (ii) potentially everybody has the capability to design Learning games, Education Game Design • (iii) the awareness of the Context game development opportunities and needs in TEL community.Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 4. Workshop aim • to build an understanding of the basic concepts in game design.Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 5. How to achieve the workshop’s aim • Offer a brief presentation • History • Serious Games • Game Design Basic Concepts • Designing Game Tips • Hands on • Design a game • Evaluate your designs • DiscussionSunday, 27 May 2012
  • 6. preview: Hands on • Create a turn-based game for two players. • The game has to help the player to understand/learn something. You can choose the topic. • The game will be designed in 15 minutes. • The gameplay will occur within an A3 surface. • Turns or moves may be signaled by either a six sided dice (D6) or a coin. (I offer: A3 surface, color papers, pencil colors, dices)Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 7. History Brief PresentationSunday, 27 May 2012
  • 8. Reference point Playing manifestations: • Being playful • Ludic activities [ludus is latin word of play] • Gameplay Figure from Islas Sedano, 2012 Source: Salen and Zimmerman (2004). Further reading: Walther, K. (2003) Playing and Gaming Defining Play. In Rules of Play. Game Design Reflections and Classifications. Game Studies Journal Vol 3 Fundamentals. MIT Press issue 1 8Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 9. Question #1 How old games are? 1. aprox. 60 years old 2. aprox. 1000 years old 3. aprox. 2000 years old 4. as old as our civilizations 5. other 9carolina islas sedano JTELSS, 2012Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 10. How old games are? 10Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 11. How old games are? “The fact that play and culture are actually interwoven with one another was neither observed nor expressed, whereas for us the whole point is to show that genuine, pure play is one of the main bases of civilization.” Huizinga, 1938. 10Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 12. Meta classification Do you know the following terms: agôn, alea, mimicry, ilinx, paidia and ludus. 11Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 13. Digital Game origins 1958 1961 Wally Steve Rusell Higginbotham Spacewar! 12carolina islas sedano JTELSS, 2012Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 14. Digital Games • Video games (consoles, computer games, MMO) • Mobile games • Location-based games* (e.g. visions with Augmented Reality) • Pervasive games* (IPerG) • ARG (Alternate Reality Games)* * transmedia 13carolina islas sedano JTELSS, 2012Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 15. Serious Games Brief PresentationSunday, 27 May 2012
  • 16. Serious games history • Edutainment • First weave aprox. 1954 with Disneyland • Second weave in the 1980’s while Disney believed thatspread should be PC started to children allowed togames their own individuality, • Serious explore have fun, and learn by personal experience • End of the 1990s with Game Studies. (Hawk, 2003) 15Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 17. Serious games history • Edutainment • First weave aprox. 1954 with Disneyland • Second weave in the 1980’s while PC started to spread "[t]he problem is with the way that creators of todays edutainment producers tend to • Serious games think about learning and education. Too often, they view education as a bitter medicine that needs the sugar-coating of entertainment to become palatable. They provide entertainment as reward if you are willing to suffer through a little education. • End of the 1990s with Game Studies. Or they boast that you will have so much fun using their products that you wont even realize that you are learning — as if learning were the most unpleasant experience in the world" (Resnick, 2006). 16Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 18. Serious games history • Edutainment • First weave aprox. 1954 with Disneyland • Second weave in the 1980’s while PC started to spread • Serious games • The term starts to be often used at the end of the 1990s with Game Studies. 17Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 19. Today’s arguments in serious games Lindroth (2011). Games, Learning and Education Course. Göthenburg University. He mentions: • Side effects of the technology. For instance, while players play, they gain new literacy skills from digital games, such as multitasking (e.g. Prensky, 2000. Digital Game-based learning) • Players acquire knowledge as a side effect of their gameplay. For instance, multimodal representations of a subject (e.g. Gee, 2003. What video game have to teach us about learning and literacy) 18Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 20. Serious games from game designers perspective (based on Brathwaite & Schreiber, 2009) • Training games • Health games • Advergames and anti-advergames • Social-awareness games, persuasive games (Ian Bogost) • Games as a teaching tool (e.g. game design workshops, inspirational tool as the Myst platform, MindcraftEdu) 19Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 21. Challenges for serious games • Difficult making games that teach and are fun • Conflict between educational goals and the characteristics of games • Efficiency in games (less efficient than other methodologies) • Educators’ negative believes about games • Misinterpretations of Gamification 20Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 22. Game Design Basic Concepts Basic and Brief PresentationSunday, 27 May 2012
  • 23. System.... (in engineering) ..... is a combination of components that act jointly to achieve a specific objective. 22carolina islas sedano JTELSS, 2012Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 24. System.... (in engineering) ..... is a combination of components that act jointly to achieve a specific objective.Ogata, K. (1987) Dynamic Systems. Page 417 22carolina islas sedano JTELSS, 2012Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 25. System lexicon (engineering) A component is a particular unit in the function of a system. A system can be call dynamic when the output depends of an input from the past. That means, systems are changing states or moving constantly to be useful. Example: vehicles, entertainment equipment (TV, radio), computers. A static system is constant. Example: buildings, bridges, furniture. 23carolina islas sedano JTELSS, 2012Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 26. Defining Games Games are dynamics systems of interaction approached with a playful attitude. Games consist of • Game components often includes aesthetics, story, technology • Game mechanics 24carolina islas sedano JTELSS, 2012Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 27. Technology is... .... essentially the medium in which the aesthetics take place, in which the mechanics will occur, and which the story will be told (Schell, 2008 pg 42). 25carolina islas sedano JTELSS, 2012Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 28. Bonus: Gartner Hype Cycle Figure source here 26carolina islas sedano JTELSS, 2012Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 29. Digital technology for this workshop 27 photo sourceSunday, 27 May 2012
  • 30. Game mechanics • Game mechanics are the core of the game. • Taxonomies of game mechanics are incomplete. Why? a) involve objective set of rules b) involve mental models of the players. 28carolina islas sedano JTELSS, 2012Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 31. Game mechanics bonus 29carolina islas sedano JTELSS, 2012Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 32. What do designers do? • Everything we have around us has been designed (Cross, 2006) • The ability of designers to produce efficient, effective, imaginative and stimulating designs is therefore important to all of us (Cross, 2006). Source: Cross, N.(2006). Designerly ways of knowing. 30carolina islas sedano JTELSS, 2012Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 33. Game design Game design is the process of creating the content and rules of a game. Good game design is the process of creating goals that a player feels motivated to reach and rules that a player must follow as he makes meaningful decisions in pursuit of those goals. (Brathwaite & Schreiber, 2009) 31carolina islas sedano JTELSS, 2012Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 34. Designing Games Tips Brief Presentation Remember: we design for players! DESIGNER CREATES AN EXPERIENCE FOR THE PLAYERSSunday, 27 May 2012
  • 35. Ways to think or frame about the game of Chess 1. Strictly a strategic and mathematical system. Source: Salen and Zimmerman (2004). Game Design Fundamentals. MIT Press 33Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 36. Ways to think or frame about the game of Chess 1. Strictly a strategic and mathematical system. 2. System of interaction between players and the game. Source: Salen and Zimmerman (2004). Game Design Fundamentals. MIT Press 33Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 37. Ways to think or frame about the game of Chess 1. Strictly a strategic and mathematical system. 2. System of interaction between players and the game. Source: Salen and Zimmerman (2004). Game Design Fundamentals. MIT Press Source photo geograph 33Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 38. Taxonomy of Game Mechanics suggested by Schell. 1. Space 2. Object, attribute and states 3. Actions 4. Rules 5. Skills 6. Chance 34carolina islas sedano JTELSS, 2012Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 39. Schell’s Taxonomy Mechanic #1: Space • Are either discrete or continuos • Have some number of dimensions • Have bounded areas which may or may not be connected 35carolina islas sedano JTELSS, 2012Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 40. Schell’s Taxonomy Mechanic #1: Space Examples: Source image tic-tac-toe Source image pool table 36carolina islas sedano JTELSS, 2012Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 41. Schell’s Taxonomy Mechanic #1: Space Examples: Figure based on Schell’s concept 37carolina islas sedano JTELSS, 2012Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 42. Schell’s Taxonomy Mechanic #2: Object, Attributes and States • Objects: characters, tokens, scoreboards, anything that can be seen or manipulated in your game. Objects have one or more attributes, one of which is often the current position in the game space 38carolina islas sedano JTELSS, 2012Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 43. Schell’s Taxonomy Mechanic #2: Object, Attributes and States • Attributes are categories of information about an object. • Each attribute has a current state. 39carolina islas sedano JTELSS, 2012Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 44. Schell’s Taxonomy Mechanic #2: Object, Attributes and States Source image monopoly 40carolina islas sedano JTELSS, 2012Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 45. Schell’s Taxonomy Mechanic #2: Object, Attributes and States TIP SECRETS Who is aware of which attributes and their states? 41carolina islas sedano JTELSS, 2012Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 46. Schell’s Taxonomy Mechanic #2: Object, Attributes and States TIP fates game Player 3 C D E Player 1 A B Player 2 Figure based on Schell’s concept 42carolina islas sedano JTELSS, 2012Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 47. Schell’s Taxonomy Mechanic #3: Actions • Operative actions - simple actions that the player can take. Source image checkers 43carolina islas sedano JTELSS, 2012Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 48. Schell’s Taxonomy Mechanic #3: Actions • Resultant actions - are only meaningful in the larger picture of the game. Resultant actions are not part of the rules, but rather actions and strategies that emerge as the game is played. Interesting emergent actions are the hallmark of a good game. (Schell, 2008) 44carolina islas sedano JTELSS, 2012Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 49. Schell’s Taxonomy Mechanic #4: Rules • Fundamental mechanic. • Define the space, the objects, the actions, the consequences of the actions, the constrains on the actions and the goals. 45carolina islas sedano JTELSS, 2012Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 50. Schell’s Taxonomy Mechanic #4: Rules • Most important rule specify the game’s goal: 1) Concrete 2) Achievable 3) Rewarding 46carolina islas sedano JTELSS, 2012Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 51. Schell’s Taxonomy Mechanic #5: Skill • Mechanic that focuses on the player instead of on the game. Skills can be general be divided in: 1) Physical skills 2) Mental skills 3) Social skills • Pay attention in the distinction between real skill VS virtual skill 47carolina islas sedano JTELSS, 2012Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 52. Schell’s Taxonomy Mechanic #6: Chance • Chance = uncertainty = surprise. • mathematical perspective • perceived probability (human element) 48carolina islas sedano JTELSS, 2012Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 53. Mathematical perspective 3 basic tips 1. Suggestion to scale 0 to 1 (0% to 100%) -10% winning? or 124.12 % of chance of win 2. OR can mean Add 4/52 + 12/52 = 16/52 = 30.76% (13 cards - 1 of the ace = 12) 49Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 54. Mathematical perspective 3 basic tips 3. Probability distribution What actions do you want to have more/less often in your game? Analyze the expected value for specific transactions in the game. photo source 50Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 55. Perceived probability... • Game A: 66% chance of winning $2400 33% chance of winning $2500 1% chance of winning $0 Expected value of game: (0.66x$2400)+(0.33x$2500)+(0.01x$0)=$2409 • Game B: 100% chance of winning $2400 Expected value of the game: (1x$2400)=$2400 51Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 56. Perceived probability... Kahneman and Tversky (psychologists) study how we can under-estimate and over-estimate situations: Cause of death estimated chance actual chance heart disease 22% 34% cancer 18% 23% other natural causes 33% 35% accident 32% 5% homicide 10% 1% other unnatural causes 11% 2% 52Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 57. Game dynamics Once players are playing the game is possible to see the game mechanics in movement, because the game dynamics unveil. Game dynamics allow game designers to balance the game with different choices, for example: • rewards VS punishment, • skill VS chance, • competition VS cooperation, • short VS long, .... 53carolina islas sedano JTELSS, 2012Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 58. Hands on part I: DESIGN • Create a turn-based game for two players. • The game has to help the player to understand/learn something. You can choose the topic. • The game will be designed in 15 minutes. • The gameplay will occur within an A3 surface. • Turns or moves may be signaled by either a six sided dice (D6) or a coin. (I offer: A3 surface, color papers, pencil colors, dices) • Think on the: • Space, • Object, attributes and states, • Actions, • Rules, • Skills, • Chance • I recommend to balance skill VS chance! • Remember the game is for a player!!!! • Deliver paper prototype which will be played in the next phase.Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 59. Question might help in the design: 1. Is the goal clear for the players in the game? 2. What skills does the game require from the player? 3. What sort of emotions is the game trying to evoke in the player? 4. What should the player take away from the game? 5. What sort of control will the player have over the game-world? 6. How is this game unique? 7. What do you want the players to understand/ learn? 55Sunday, 27 May 2012
  • 60. Thank you for your attentionSunday, 27 May 2012