HEAT STRESS PREVENTION – A CASE STUDY | Dr. Divyang Shah, – Occupational Health & Medical Services
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HEAT STRESS PREVENTION – A CASE STUDY | Dr. Divyang Shah, – Occupational Health & Medical Services

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Global HSE Conference | Sept 26 - 27 2013 | New Delhi, India

Global HSE Conference | Sept 26 - 27 2013 | New Delhi, India

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HEAT STRESS PREVENTION – A CASE STUDY | Dr. Divyang Shah, – Occupational Health & Medical Services Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Technical Session # (Include session no.) Topic : (Include topic name) HEAT STRESS PREVENTION – A CASE STUDY Dr. Divyang Shah MD (PSM), DIH Deputy General Manager – Occupational Health & Medical Services, Alan Shreeve Head - Construction Cairn India Ltd.
  • 2. Technical Session # (Include session no.) Topic : (Include topic name) Agenda
  • 3. Technical Session # (Include session no.) Topic : (Include topic name) Heat Storage = Metabolism ± Radiation ± Conduction ± Convection - Evaporation Heat Stress is the burden or load of heat that must be dissipated if the body is to remain in thermal equilibrium. What is heat stress?
  • 4. Technical Session # (Include session no.) Topic : (Include topic name) Causal Factors Job factors- • Types of clothing's/ PPEs • Work load
  • 5. Technical Session # (Include session no.) Topic : (Include topic name) Effect on Body Due To Increase of Core Temp. Exposure to hot environment Body temperature rises To get rid of excess heat heart rate increases Blood flow to skin increases which carried away the excess heat from vital organs to skin Body sweats Evaporation of sweat Results in decrease in body temp
  • 6. Technical Session # (Include session no.) Topic : (Include topic name) Effects of Heat Stress HEAT CRAMPS
  • 7. Technical Session # (Include session no.) Topic : (Include topic name) Rajasthan, situated in the western part of India is known for the largest desert in Indian subcontinent. The largest discovery of oil in Indian soil was made in 2006.
  • 8. Technical Session # (Include session no.) Topic : (Include topic name) Problem Statement The death toll is expected to rise with experts forecasting temperatures approaching 50 oC (122 oF) in coming months. More than 100 people are reported to have died in the state of Gujarat where the mercury topped at 48.5 oC last week. At least 90 died in Maharashtra, 35 in Rajasthan and 34 in Bihar.
  • 9. Technical Session # (Include session no.) Topic : (Include topic name) Problem Statement • 2009-10 The peak of construction activities • More than 18000 workforce were involved in construction and commissioning activities • The temperature in this area usually reaches up to 480C (1200F) in summer, • Being a mega construction project, all personnel were pressed against tight project execution schedule. 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 Jan/04 Apr/04 Jul/04 Oct/04 Jan/05 Apr/05 Jul/05 Oct/05 Jan/06 Apr/06 Jul/06 Oct/06 Jan/07 Apr/07 Jul/07 Oct/07 Jan/08 Apr/08 Jul/08 Oct/08 Jan/09 Apr/09 Jul/09 Oct/09 Jan/10 TempoC Maximum Temperature over last 6 years Average Max. Highest
  • 10. Technical Session # (Include session no.) Topic : (Include topic name) Major Activities Work at Height Excavation Manual Material Handling Civil / Earthen work Travel
  • 11. Technical Session # (Include session no.) Topic : (Include topic name) INTERVENTIONS
  • 12. Technical Session # (Include session no.) Topic : (Include topic name) Management commitment Rahul Dhir, CEO & MD Elango P, Interim CEO Executive Directors
  • 13. Technical Session # (Include session no.) Topic : (Include topic name) Heat Stress Prevention Guidelines Table of Contents DOCUMENT CHANGE HISTORY 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS 2 1. PURPOSE 3 2. SCOPE 3 3. DEFINITIONS 3 4. RECOGNIZE THE HEAT STRESS HAZARD IN TERMS OF BODY TEMPERATURE: 4 5. EVALUATION: 5 6. CONTROL: 6 7. ACCLIMATISATION 8 8. MONITORING REGIME 8 9. TRAINING AND SUPPORT 9 10. RESPONSIBILITIES 9 11. REFERENCES 10 APPENDIX–A FITNESS FOR WORK IN HEAT STRESS ENVIRONMENT 11 APPENDIX-B HEAT STRESS INDICES 12 APPENDIX-C FLAG SIGNS AND RECOMMENDED ACTIONS 14 APPENDIX-D WBGT AND RECOMMENDED WORK REST REGIME 16 APPENDIX–E SELF EVALUATION 17 APPENDIX-F GUIDELINES FOR ACCLIMATISATION AND RE- ACCLIMATISATION 18 APPENDIX-G EFFECTS OF HEAT STRESS 19
  • 14. Technical Session # (Include session no.) Topic : (Include topic name) Cairn India HSS October 13 Control of Heat Stress  Acclimatization  Fluid Replacement  Engineering Controls  Work Practices  Administrative Controls  PPEs
  • 15. Technical Session # (Include session no.) Topic : (Include topic name) Cairn India HSS October 13 Acclimatisation Activity (Percentage of full work assignment) Day Experienced Worker New Worker 1st 50% 20% 2nd 60% 40% 3rd 80% 60% 4th 100% 80% 5th 100% 100%
  • 16. Technical Session # (Include session no.) Topic : (Include topic name) Awareness campaign Self Evaluation Urine Colour Interpretation and remedy Extremely Dehydrated Drink water immediately Mildly Dehydrated Drink More Water Not dehydrated Drink water regularly
  • 17. Technical Session # (Include session no.) Topic : (Include topic name) Heat index chart Relative Humidity in % 100% 95% 90% 85% 80% 75% 70% 65% 60% 55% 50% 45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% AirTemp(inOC) 49 50 49 48 49 48 47 50 47 47 46 49 46 46 45 50 47 45 45 44 49 46 43 44 43 49 47 45 42 43 42 50 48 46 43 41 42 41 48 46 44 42 40 41 40 49 47 45 43 41 39 40 39 49 47 45 43 41 40 37 39 38 49 47 45 43 42 40 39 36 38 37 49 47 45 44 42 40 38 37 35 37 36 50 49 47 45 43 42 40 39 37 36 34 36 35 50 48 47 45 43 42 40 39 37 36 35 33 35 34 49 48 46 45 43 42 40 39 37 36 34 34 31 34 33 50 48 47 46 44 43 41 40 38 37 36 34 33 33 30 33 32 50 49 48 46 45 44 42 41 40 38 37 35 34 33 32 30 29 32 31 50 49 48 47 45 44 43 42 40 39 38 37 35 34 33 32 30 29 28 31 30 48 47 46 44 43 42 41 40 39 37 36 35 33 32 31 30 29 28 27 30 29 46 45 43 42 41 40 39 38 37 36 35 33 32 31 30 29 28 27 26 29 28 43 42 41 40 39 38 37 36 35 34 33 32 30 30 29 28 27 26 25 28 27 41 40 39 38 37 36 35 34 33 32 31 30 29 28 28 26 25 27 26 39 38 37 36 35 34 33 33 32 31 30 29 27 27 26 25 26 25 37 36 35 34 33 33 32 31 30 29 28 27 26 26 25 25 24 35 34 33 33 32 31 30 29 28 28 27 26 25 24 23 33 32 31 31 30 29 28 28 27 26 25 23 22 31 30 30 29 28 27 27 26 25 25 22 21 29 29 28 27 26 26 25 21 100% 95% 90% 85% 80% 75% 70% 65% 60% 55% 50% 45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% Old chart Limitation: Requires WBGT meter, in absence of which interpretation in incorrect New chart Advantage: Based on recent research and publication, does not require special equipment, interpretation is based on air temperature and relative humidity only.
  • 18. Technical Session # (Include session no.) Topic : (Include topic name) Flag signs Danger Category/ Flag Colour WBGT Index Humidex (Based on temp. and humidity) Heat related Health Risk Water Requirement (1 cup = ½ litre) Work: Rest Period (Minutes) Controls Humidex -1 Moderate physical Work, unacclimatised worker, OR Heavy physical work, acclimatised worker Humidex -2 Moderate physical work, acclimatised worker, OR Light physical work, unacclimatised worker IV. Extreme Danger ≥40 ≥46 ≥50 Heat stroke or sunstroke imminent 1 cup every 10 minutes - A. For drilling & well services activity*: Work rest regime of 20:10 minutes, worker must be acclimatized B. For other Activities and Operations: Work inside the buildings and under well ventilated shed/ shade areas. No work at elevation or where exposed to direct sun III. Danger 34-39 38-45 43-49 Sunstroke, Heat Exhaustion or Heat cramps likely. Heat Stroke possible with prolonged exposure and physical activity 1 cup every 15 minutes 30:10 Work under shade, Elevated work stopped II. Extreme Caution 28-33 30-37 36-42 Heat stroke, Heat Exhaustion or Heat cramps possible with prolonged exposure and physical activity 1 cup every 20 minutes 45:15 No working alone, Self-pace I. Caution 22-27 Up to 29 Up to 35 Fatigue possible with prolonged exposure and physical activity. 1 cup every 30 minutes Continuo us work Continuous visual monitoring of workers in direct sun and heavy work *There are certain jobs (like preparing casings, cleaning, housekeeping etc) which can be planned during other than “Red Flag” period. Rest periods do not necessarily mean that the workers are on break; these can be productive times. During the rest periods, workers may continue
  • 19. Technical Session # (Include session no.) Topic : (Include topic name)
  • 20. Technical Session # (Include session no.) Topic : (Include topic name) •Heat Stress induction training •Frequent workshops and road shows for workforce •>700 earthen pots at worksite •All workforce provided with insulated water bottle before entering the site •Rest shelters •Hourly monitoring and broadcasting of heat index •Flag signs at work locations to ensure continuous focus
  • 21. Technical Session # (Include session no.) Topic : (Include topic name) Success: Zero Incident of Heat Related Illness throughout the Project Period Prime Minister of India with First oil from the facility