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    • Name: Caila BishopDate: 1-9-12Grade Level/Subject: 2nd grade/ Science/ Weather UnitActivity: Weather ObservationsPrerequisite Knowledge: Students should be familiar with charts and how to read them.Approximate Time: 50 minutes to introduce the lesson, 5 minutes (3 weeks)Student Objectives/Student Outcomes:Students will practice -Describing observed events -Collecting data -Recording data -Arranging data -Comparing observations of individual and group results.Students will know and observe that -The weather changes from day to day and season to season -Some patterns of weather are repeated often and these can help us predict the weather.
    • Content Standards: - SCI.K-3.11.A.1e - [Benchmark] - Arrange data into logical patterns and describe the patterns. - SCI.K-3.11.A.1a - [Benchmark] - Describe an observed event.Materials/Resources/Technology:-newspaper (everyday)-weather journals-electronic whiteboardImplementation:Opening of the lesson:Tell students that they will be making and recording weather observations every day for the next 2-3weeks. Ask students for input on what kind of information they think they should observe and record.Procedure: Scan the weather section/map out of the news-Gazette paper and print in into smartboard. Pull up theweather map on the electronic whiteboard. Ask students to discuss the different things the see. Askstudents if they can find the temperature, wind speed, wind direction, precipitation and cloudinformation about yesterday’s weather. Make sure that you tell students that the map containsinformation about what today’s weather will be like and the information on the side of the math tellsthem about yesterday’s weather. Tell students that there is no way that when the paper comes out atfive o’clock in the morning they already recorded the amount of precipitation we have received for thewhole day. Review the term precipitation with the students. Have the students write the definitiondown in their weather journal vocabulary page. Use the electronic whiteboards highlighter to highlight
    • the temperature, wind speed, wind direction, precipitation and clouds so that the students can see itbetter. Fill out one day in the weather chart with the students. Model how students should fill out thechart. Tell students that you will post out in the hall the weather map from the newspaper everyday. Tellstudents that you will also highlight where they need to look to get the information. (Make sure thatwhen you post the newspaper clippings in the hall you arrange the data in order.)Assessment:You may ask students to share some of their observations each day, if desired, or you can wait until theend of the observation period. It is likely that there will be some discrepancies in the data. Students willbe assessed on how well they recorded their weather observations in the journal and whether or notthey filled out all of the boxes in the chart.Name: Caila BishopDate: 1-17-12Grade Level/Subject: 2nd grade/ Science/ Weather Unit – Temperature/ThermometersActivity- Water Temperature ExperimentPrerequisite Knowledge: Students should be familiar with how to read a thermometer. Students shouldknow that each line on their thermometer represents 2 degrees
    • Approximate Time: 50 minute lessonStudent Objectives/Student Outcomes: -Students will observe and know that temperature is a term we can use to talk about how “hot” or how“cold”something is.- Students will know that when we talk about temperature related to weather, we are talking about thetemperaturein the air outside.-Students will know that a thermometer is used to measure temperature.-Students will know that the higher numbers on a thermometer correspond to hotter temperatures andthe lowernumbers on the thermometer correspond to colder temperaturesContent Standards: -SCI.K-3.11.B.1d - [Benchmark] - Test the device and record results using given instruments,techniquesand measurement methods. -SCI.K-3.13.B.1a - [Benchmark] - Explain the uses of common scientific instruments (e.g., ruler,thermometer, balance, probe, computer). -SCI.K-3.13.B.1b - [Benchmark] - Explain how using measuring tools improves the accuracy ofestimates.Materials/Resources/Technology:
    • -3 cups per group -thermometer per group -hot water -cold water -weather journal -sticky note per group -electronic whiteboardImplementation:Opening of lesson: Introduce the lesson by reviewing with students what they know aboutthermometers. Make sure that students know that each number on a thermometer is a degree and isused to measure temperature. Make sure that students know that the tube on the thermometer is filledwith a liquid that that goes higher when it is warmer and goes lower when it’s colder. Also make surethat students know the higher numbers on the thermometers refers to hotter temperatures if it is above0 degrees and the lower numbers means colder.Accommodations: I handed a thermometer to each of my students. As I discussed the different parts ofthe thermometer I had the students point to the different parts that I was describing. This helped myvisual learners and my student who was cognitively disabled.Procedure:1. Tell the student that today they will be doing a water temperature experiment.2. Break the students up into groups of two3. Give each group 3 cups and 1 sticky note4. Tell students that today they will be recording the temperature of hot water, cold water andboth the5. hot and cold water mixed together.
    • 6. Have students guess on their yellow sticky note what they think the hot temperature, coldtemperature and mixed temperature would be (this is one way I enhanced the lesson for the students)7. Have students draw a line next to their prediction and tell them that once they have measuredthe temperature of all three water cups they will write down what their thermometer read.8. After students have recorded their temperatures have them clear off their desks.9. Have students open their journal to the water temperature experiment page.10. Have them record in their journal the procedure they followed to conduct the experiment.11. Next have the students draw their observations12. Last have the students write what they learnedAccommodations: During this lesson I used the electronic whiteboard to model for the students howthey would conduct the experiment. I drew three cups on the whiteboard and labeled them cold water,hot water and mixed water. I then drew a thermometer in each cup and read the temperature.Another thing I did to assist the students during this experiment was model how to write out theprocedure. Together me and the students wrote down the first step, second step, third step…etc. thatwe followed to conduct our experiment.Assessment: Students will be assessed on how well they worked in their groups. Students will also beassessed on their journal entry.Name: Caila Bishop
    • Date: 1-19-12Grade Level/Subject: 2nd grade/ Science/ Weather Unit – Water and WeatherActivity- Making a ModelPrerequisite Knowledge: None requiredApproximate Time: 45 minute lesson (1-2 days)Student Objectives/Student Outcomes:-Students will observe and know that the movement of water from one place to another affects theweather.-Water moves from the ground (on or in it) into the air, forms clouds high in the air, and then falls backto the ground as some form of precipitation ( usually rain or snow).-Temperature affects the movement of water.-Water is collected in the ground, ocean, rivers, streams, trees-Water packs together in the clouds (condensation)Content Standards: -SCI.K-3.11.A.1a - [Benchmark] - Describe an observed event. -SCI.K-3.11.A.1b - [Benchmark] - Develop questions on scientific topics. -SCI.K-3.11.B.1d - [Benchmark] - Test the device and record results using given instruments, techniques and measurement methods.
    • Materials/Resources/Technology:- Heavy duty plastic wrap- Transparent Tape- 4 Washers- Blue Food Coloring- 1 Small, Heavy Bowl- 1 Large, Clear Plastic Bowl- Sunny window or heated lampImplementation:Opening of lesson: Introduce the lesson by asking student questions about water and weather. Discusswith students where precipitation comes from. Introduce the idea that water moves from one place toanother, but it can’t just appear from nowhere. Make sure students understand what a cycle is. Tellstudents that a cycle is changing and it returns to its original starting point.Procedure:-Tell students that you will make a model that will demonstrate the water cycle process-Tell students that when the sun hits the land it heats up the water that is collected in the ground, river,ocean, and lakes. The sun causes some of the water to rise and evaporate up into the air where it iscooler. Tell students that they cannot see water in the air but water is all around them however it is inits evaporated form. This means that you cannot see the water around you. Then tell students that oncethe water rises in the air these small pieces of water start to get cooler and stick together and form evenbigger pieces. Tell students that this is condensation. When the bigger pieces of water get heavy it
    • begins to rain or snow, this is called precipitation. When it rain/ snows the water falls back to the earthand the cycle changes all over again.- Once you have explained the cycle draw a picture on the electronic whiteboard of the cycle. Makesure that you label each part. (I also showed the class a poster board with the water cycle on it. Thishelped the students a lot). Repeat the cycle over with your students about three times. Then start to callon students to have them repeat the cycle back to you.- Show the students the following three videos: - http://youtu.be/UDyPkjQxkas - http://youtu.be/StPobH5ODTw - http://youtu.be/8KbbSL43CN8Procedure for making the model:Put together the model while the students are watching, so they can easily see exactly what’s done andwon’t view this as having set up a magic trick in advance.1. Put the small heavy bowl inside the larger bowl.2. Add water to the larger bowl so that it comes to within about ½ inch of the edge of the smallerbowl. You don’t want to get any water in the smaller bowl at this point. Mark the side of the bowl withtape to show the starting water level.3. Add a drop or two of food coloring to the water4. Cover the bowl tightly with plastic wrap. Tape down the edges of the plastic wrap to the bowl.You want this fairly air-tight, so that most of the water remains in the bowl.5. Place two stacked washers on the top of the plastic wrap, directly above the small bowl so thatthe plastic wrap slants down some toward the middle.6. Have students draw the model in their journals. Under their drawings write “Model of WaterMovement.” Accuracy is not important but students should realize that there is water in the large bowland not in the small bowl7. Carefully place the model in the direct sunlight and leave it there for at least two days.8. Students should observe the model twice each day and record any changes they see.
    • Discussion-Ask students for their ideas about what happened?-How did the water get into the small bowl?-Use student ideas, if possible to lead to the explanation of evaporation.Assessment:Have students complete the water cycle page in their journal. This is one way to assess the students.Name: Caila BishopDate: 1-24-12Grade Level/Subject: 2nd grade/ Science/ Weather Unit – Water and WeatherActivity- Making a rain gaugePrerequisite Knowledge: None requiredApproximate Time: 50 minutes lesson (2 days)
    • Student Objectives/Student Outcomes:Given the problem of formulating solutions students will -formulate possible solutions -Design a device that will be useful in solving the problem -Build the device using the materials and tools provided -Test the device and record results using the given instruments, techniques, and measurement methods. -Report the design, the test process and the results in solving the problem.Content Standards: - SCI.K-3.11.B.1a - [Benchmark] - Given a simple design problem formulates possible solutions. - SCI.K-3.11.B.1b - [Benchmark] - Design a device that will be useful in solving the problem. - SCI.K-3.11.B.1c - [Benchmark] - Build the device using the materials and tools provided. - SCI.K-3.11.B.1d - [Benchmark] - Test the device and record results using given instruments, techniques and measurement methods. - SCI.K-3.11.B.1e - [Benchmark] - Report the design of the device, the test process and the results in solving a given problem.Materials/Resources/Technology:-cups-variety of containers (several sizes-clear, opaque, paper)-Rulers-Masking Tape-Glue-Anything the students want to bring from home
    • Implementation:Opening of the lesson: Ask the student if they have ever heard people talking about “how much” rain orsnow has fallen during a particular time period, like a day or a month. Then ask students how thinksomeone would get this information. For example how they would measure rain or snow. Also ask whythey think this information might be useful to people (floods, plant growth, water to drink, etc). Afteryour discussion tells students that a rain gauge is used to measure the amount of rain that has fallenover a particular time period. Pull up pictures on the web of different types of rain gauges.Procedure:Day One: Tell students that they will be making a rain gauge. Ask students what type of things they needto consider when they are creating their rain gauge. Draw on the electronic whiteboard a simple pictureof a rain gauge. Label the different parts of your rain gauge (cup, ruler, tape, etc.). Discuss the procedureyou would follow to put it together. Put students into partners of two. Tell students that today they willbe drawing the rain gauge they are going to create. Show students the different types of materials youhave in the box. Also tell students that they can bring materials from home. Tell students that when theycreate their drawing you want them to write on the side of their drawing the different materials theywill need and will be bringing from home. After you have given directions allow students to get intogroups and begin discussing their rain gauge and the materials they will need.Day Two: Have students assemble their rain gauge. Once the gauges are assembled, you will want tocheck each one, and suggest modifications or let the students try the gauge as is. Take a picture of eachgroup along with their completed assembled rain gauge. Have students present their rain gauge to theclass and discuss how they assembled their rain gauge and why they assembled it that way using thedifferent materials. Next, the students will need to select a place to put their rain gauges, somewhere bythe school where they won’t be disturbed. Have students write in their journal the procedure theyfollowed to assemble their rain gauge. Model how to write the procedure on the electronic whiteboard.Also have students draw a picture of their rain gauge in their journal. The next time there isprecipitation, the students will check their gauges and write in their journal about how well the gaugeworked and how much precipitation was collected.Assessment: Students will be assessed on their group participation. Students will also be assessed ontheir journal entry.
    • Name: Caila BishopDate: 1-26-12Grade Level/Subject: 2nd grade/ Science/ Weather Unit – Water and WeatherActivity: WindPrerequisite Knowledge: None requiredApproximate Time: 50 minutes lesson (2 days)Student Objectives/Student Outcomes:Given the problem of formulating solutions students will -formulate possible solutions -Design a device that will be useful in solving the problem -Build the device using the materials and tools provided -Test the device and record results using the given instruments, techniques, and measurement methods. -Report the design, the test process and the results in solving the problem.
    • Students will know and observe: -wind has direction and force -wind comes from different directions at different times -wind has force (can push things) and the amount of force is different at different times. -observation of things that are blowing in the wind can tell us things about wind direction andforce -knowing about wind direction and force can help predict weather.Content Standards: - SCI.K-3.11.B.1a - [Benchmark] - Given a simple design problem formulates possible solutions. - SCI.K-3.11.B.1b - [Benchmark] - Design a device that will be useful in solving the problem. - SCI.K-3.11.B.1c - [Benchmark] - Build the device using the materials and tools provided. - SCI.K-3.11.B.1d - [Benchmark] - Test the device and record results using given instruments, techniques and measurement methods. - SCI.K-3.11.B.1e - [Benchmark] - Report the design of the device, the test process and the results in solving a given problem.Materials/Resources/Technology:- 1 thin wooden dowel-String-Masking tape-Fabric scraps of different sizes and weights-Tissue paper or crepe paper-Paper reinforcements
    • -compasses (optional)-scissors-electronic whiteboard-computer with internet access-weather journalsImplementation:Opening of the lesson:Ask students the following questions dealing with wind:1. Describe the wind2. How do you know that there is wind?3. Can you hear wind?4. Are you able to feel it?5. Can the wind be seen and can you see things that are being moved by the wind6. How do you know when the wind is blowing slightly or very hard?7. Does the wind always blow things in the same direction?8. Why would scientists be interested in wind direction and force?9. Have you noticed wind being different in different kinds of weather? Procedure:Day One: Pair students up into groups of two or three. Tell students that they are going to design adevice that measures wind speed and direction. Show students the materials you have for them to use.
    • Ask students to view the materials and think about why they are important. Draw a picture on theelectronic whiteboard of a wind device and label the device of the materials that you used to make it(draw something similar to a flag). Allow students time to ask you questions. Show students pictures ofwind vanes on the internet. Have students go back to their seats with their group members. Tellstudents that before they begin they must draw a picture of the wind device they are going to create.They must also label the materials they are going to use. In addition to labeling the materials studentswill have to write the procedure they are going to follow the next day to create their wind vane.Day Two: Have students assemble their wind devices. Allow students to go outside and test out theirwind devices. When students are outside have them read their compass. Point in the direction of thenorth, east, south and west for the students. Ask students what direction the wind is moving. Ask themif the wind is strong? If it is strong how do they know?Bring students back inside. Have them draw a picture of their wind device in their weather journal andhave them write what they learned. Make sure that students state how they would have created theirwind vane differently or what they would do next time. Have students come to the carpet ask studentsto share their findings. If there are discrepancies, discuss why these discrepancies occurred.Assessment: Students will be assessed on their group participation. Students will also be assessed ontheir journal entry.Additional LessonName: Caila BishopDate: 1-23-12Grade Level/Subject: 2nd grade/ Science/ Weather Unit – Water and WeatherActivity: Water Cycle Packet
    • Prerequisite Knowledge: Students should be familiar with the water cycle. They should be able to discusshow the water cycle works. They should know the meaning of the following words: Evaporation,Precipitation, Collection, and CondensationApproximate Time: 50 minutes lessonStudent Objectives/Student Outcomes:-Students will observe and know that the movement of water from one place to another affects theweather.-Water moves from the ground (on or in it) into the air, forms clouds high in the air, and then falls backtothe ground as some form of precipitation (usually rain or snow).-Temperature affects the movement of water.-Water is collected in the ground, ocean, rivers, streams, trees-Water packs together in the clouds (condensation)Content Standards: - SCI.K-3.12.E.1a - [Benchmark] - Identify components and describe diverse features of theEarths land, waterand atmospheric systems. - SCI.K-3.12.E.1b - [Benchmark] - Identify and describe patterns of weather and seasonal change.Materials/Resources/Technology:
    • -chart that shows the weather cycle-water cycle packet (per student)Implementation:Opening of the lesson:Review the water cycle with the students. Call on random students and have them come up and tell theclass how the cycle works. Cover up the words collection, evaporation, condensation, and precipitationon the weather chart. Have students guess which part of the cycle each pictures represents.Procedure: Introduce the water cycle packet to the students. Call on students to discuss what is occurring in eachpicture. Make sure students are using the correct vocabulary. After introducing the packet, tell studentsthat they are going to work independently on the packet. They are going to look at each picture andwrite what is occurring and what part of the water cycle it represents. Students are allowed to use theirweather journal vocabulary page to assist them in this activity.Assessment:Students will be assessed on the water cycle packet. They will be assessed on whether they understoodwhat was occurring in the pictures. They will also be assessed on whether or not they used the correctvocabulary (collection, evaporation, and condensation, precipitation) to describe what was occurring.Additional LessonName: Caila Bishop
    • Date: 1-28-12Grade Level/Subject: 2nd grade/ Science/ Weather Unit – Water and WeatherActivity: Critiquing rain gaugesPrerequisite Knowledge: Students should know how to observe devices. Students should know how tooffer suggestions appropriately. Students should know how to be respectful to their classmates.Approximate Time: 50 minutesStudent Objectives/Student Outcomes: -Students will discuss the different rain gauges that their classmates designed. -Students will be able to participate in a group discussion. -Students will give appropriate feedback. -Students will critique the rain gauges and offer suggestions or recommendations forimprovements.Content Standards: - SCI.K-3.13.A.1c - [Benchmark] - Explain how knowledge can be gained by careful observation. - SCI.K-3.11.B.1e - [Benchmark] - Report the design of the device, the test process and theresults in solving agiven problem.
    • - SCI.K-3.11.A.1f - [Benchmark] - Compare observations of individual and group results.Materials/Resources/Technology:-pictures of each group rain gauges-sticky notes for each group-electronic whiteboardImplementation:Opening of the lesson: Have students get into their rain gauges group. Give each group a sticky note.Have each group write on their sticky note the amount of rain fall their rain gauge collected.Procedure: Call students to the carpet. Have them bring their sticky note. Have each group put theirsticky note on the board. Tell students that you will call on them to arrange the sticky notes in ascendingorder. Once students have arranged the sticky notes in ascending discuss with students how to find themedian of the data (this tied in perfectly to the math unit I was teaching my students). Once you havefound the median tell students that the majority of group collected rainfall that was close to thatnumber. Pull up the pictures that you had taken of the students on the electronic whiteboard. Tellstudents that you are going to look at their devices and discuss any potential improvements you wouldmake next time. Also discuss with students why some of their rain gauges collected more water andsome of them collected less. Also discuss why different rain gauges worked better than others.Assessment: Students will be assessed on how well they participate in the class discussion.