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CERLIS 2011 Emerging genres in the academy? Designing an EAP pedagogy for the digital age
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CERLIS 2011 Emerging genres in the academy? Designing an EAP pedagogy for the digital age

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Presentation given at CERLIS 2011, Genre variation in English academic communication: Emerging trends and disciplinary insights, 23-25 June, 2011, Bergamo, Italy.

Presentation given at CERLIS 2011, Genre variation in English academic communication: Emerging trends and disciplinary insights, 23-25 June, 2011, Bergamo, Italy.

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  • Mention something about the project being Task-based
  • I should show them an example English for Science Project prompt here (Blind as a bat) and perhaps some of the student work, for example the lab reports and the scientific documentaries
  • Create, share and discuss a multimedia documentary which presents the theory, method and findings of a quasi-experiment, and makes effective use of verbal and non-verbal delivery techniques; Collaboratively evaluate the process and procedure of creating a documentary, and provide peer feedback on the collaborative aspects of the process; Write a reflective report based on their experiences of preparing the documentary and their in-class discussions about it.
  • A description of your topic of exploration, your aims and your hypothesis An introduction with some background theory, and relevant diagrams if necessary Details of the procedure used, photographs or other multimedia presentation of the materials and set-up Explanation of your results, with tables and charts A discussion of your results, comparing your results to your hypothesized results, and explaining sources of error A brief conclusion Any other relevant material needed to better understand your experiment and results
  • Immersion in situated practice: Practice in authentic communicative situation is required for students to learn how to collaborate…and critically evaluate information…such authentic situations can give students the opportunity to develop new technological literacies in meaningful contexts. Overt instruction: Students need the opportunities to step back under the guidence, organization, pragmatics, syntax and lexis of communication. Critical framing: making effective use of information found in online networks, necessitates a high degree of critical interpretation…to help students learn to critically interpret information and communication in a given social context. Transformed practice: involves working toward higher quality outcomes within particular contexts and applying what has been learned in new social and cultural contexts.

CERLIS 2011 Emerging genres in the academy? Designing an EAP pedagogy for the digital age CERLIS 2011 Emerging genres in the academy? Designing an EAP pedagogy for the digital age Presentation Transcript

  • Emerging genres in the academy? Designing an EAP pedagogy for the digital age. Dr Lindsay Miller City University of Hong Kong
  • Outline
    • Background and rationale
    • ESP curriculum design
    • Innovation of course design
    • Methodology and Architecture of the technological learning environment
    • Outcome
    • Conclusion
  • Background
    • Reasons for thinking about how we teach English:
    • The growth of global English
    • Changing employment patterns
    • The development and spread of technology.
    • (Warschauer, 2000)
  • Background
    • “ With the advent of computer-mediated communication have come a host of entirely new genres, situated somewhere between oracy and literacy yet also extending beyond those realms in their inclusion of visual and auditory ‘literacies’ as well - via color, sound, graphics, and video (Kress, 1998). Few literate occupations or academic sites, in the developed or developing world, will likely escape the impact of these emerging cybergenres. One of the resulting challenges for ESP researchers will be to find ways to facilitate practitioners’ conceptualization and operationalization of a more broadly inclusive multiliteracies approach to fostering and assessing genre competence ...”
    • (Belcher, 2004, p. 177: emphasis added)
  • ESP curriculum design
    • EN2251: Communication Skills I
    • Course Aims:
      • This course aims to develop students ’ ability to read a variety of scientific texts, and appropriately communicate (through speaking and writing) the findings of scientific projects in an academic context.
    • Target departments: Biology and Chemistry, Mathematics
  • Needs analysis based on:
    • Existing course (Course syllabi Course Intended Learning Outcomes)
    • Discussion with programme leaders (3 BCH/MA)
    • Examples of student work
    • Focus groups with previous students on old course
    • Literature (Disciplinary sources, e.g. research articles, websites)
  • External review: A call to action
    • “ When I first looked at the materials, one lacuna that seemed fairly obvious was a lack of attention to making students more aware of language in all its aspects ”
  • Training vs Education
    • While narrow angle courses focus on providing “learners with a restricted competence to enable them to cope with clearly defined tasks” (i.e., specific language forms to fulfill the task), wide angle courses “seek to provide learners with a general capacity to enable them to cope with undefined eventualities in the future (Widdowson, 1983 p. 6).
  • Needs analysis findings
    • Faculty perceptions of student needs:
      • Presentation skills, including esp. pronunciation
      • Writing skills, including esp. grammatical accuracy
      • Reading skills
    • Text analysis of lab reports
      • Confirmed a basic IMRD structure, with strong emphasis on the presentation and discussion of results
      • Elements like the procedure sometimes optional
  • Innovation of course design
    • Self-contained ESP course:
      • Genre-based
      • Project-based: Authentic materials and tasks
      • Focus on language form and function
      • Promoting situated learning (Lave and Wenger, 1991; Gee, 2004)
  • Outcomes and assessment
    • Individually read and summarize a short scientific article
    • In groups, orally present findings of an English for Science project
    • In groups, present in writing (i.e. as a lab report) findings of an English for Science project
    • Individually, utilize corpus tools to explore academic vocabulary
  • English for Science Project
    • Provides an overarching structure for the course
    • Students complete a quasi-experiment in groups:
      • Research the topic provided
      • Collect data
      • Orally present and interpret findings (groups)
      • Present and interpret findings in writing (individuals)
  • Principles of task design applied
    • Consciousness raising (Swales, 1990)
    • Focus on genre (Bhatia, 1991, 1993)
    • Focus on text
    • Focus on language use
    • Develop transferrable skills (Flowerdew, 1993)
    • Provide opportunities for interaction and production
  • Rationale
    • Catering to student diversity
    • Developing transferrable skills, including critical creativity in genre production
    • Aligning school-based literacy with ‘new literacies’ (New London Group, 1996; Knobel and Lankshear, 2007)
  • Intended learning outcomes
    • Create, share and discuss a multimedia documentary;
    • Collaboratively evaluate the process and procedure of creating a documentary;
    • Write a reflective report based on their experiences of preparing the documentary and their in-class discussions about it.
  • Methodology
    • Students
    • Disciplinary lecturers
    • ESP tutors
  • Methodology: Students
    • Questionnaires + Video Presentations
    • 59 Students 30 female 29 male
    • 1st , 2nd & 3rd year
    • 22 Biology students
    • 15 Chemistry students
    • 18 Environmental and Science Management / Mathematics students.
    • Focus Group Interviews
    • 21 students
  • Methodology: Lecturers
    • 4 Professors, programme leaders of Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Science and Management and Computing Mathematics
  • Methodology: ESP tutors
    • 3 tutors involved in teaching the course and running the research project. All tutors are highly skilled ESP teachers and researchers.
  • Architecture of the technological learning environment
  • Scientific Documentary
    • Working in groups of 3, create a documentary of your English for Science Project, which documents the process and findings of your experiment. You should include:
      • A description of your topic of exploration
      • An introduction with some background theory
      • Details of the procedure used
      • Explanation of your results
      • A discussion of your results
      • A brief conclusion
      • Any other relevant material needed to better understand your experiment and results
  • Scientific Documentary
    • Your documentary must include a range of media (e.g. video, audio, images, text, diagrams etc.), and all members of the project team must be involved in the narration of the documentary. Extra credit will be given for creative presentation of the information (e.g. use of interesting locations, interesting presentation techniques).
  • Outcome Initial student evaluation 1 AVG SD D N A SA Q10. The skills I learned by doing the video project are useful for my studies 3.49 0% 10% 41% 39% 10% Q11. The skills I learned by doing the video project are useful to my career 3.36 0% 14% 44% 36% 7% Q12. The skills I learned by doing the video project are useful to me personally 3.78 0% 5% 20% 66% 8% Q13. The skills I learned by doing the video project are relevant to my major subject 2.88 3% 25% 51% 20% 0%
  • Initial student evaluation 2 AVG SD D N A SA Q18. As a result of doing the video project I have improved my English language skills 3.34 0% 10% 47% 41% 2% Q19. As a result of doing the video project I have improved my English research skills 3.66 0% 8% 19% 71% 2% Q20. As a result of doing the video project I have improved my English reading skills 3.31 2% 10% 44% 44% 0% Q21. As a result of doing the video project I have improved my English writing skills 3.41 0% 7% 49% 41% 3% Q22. As a result of doing the video project I have improved my English presentation skills 3.81 0% 2% 25% 63% 10% Q23. As a result of doing the video project I have improved my English listening skills 3.44 0% 14% 36% 44% 7%
  • ESP pedagogy and ICT
    • Students (and teachers) belong to the 4th generation of computer users.
    • Theory has moved from Structuralism, Cognitivism, to Socio-Cognitivism.
    • Pedagogical aspirations moved from accuracy, to fluency to agency.
    • ICT is now integrated into language teaching and learning.
    • Internet and Multimedia used in a variety of ways.
    • ICT can be used effectively with ESP courses.
    • ICT allows access to authentic discourses via task-based learning.
  • Conclusion
    • Immersion in situated practice
    • Overt instruction
    • Critical framing
    • Transformed practice
    • New London Group (1996)
  • References
    • Belcher, D. (2004) Trends in Teaching English for Specific Purposes. Annual Review of Applied Linguistics . 24, 165-186.
    • Bhatia, V.K. (1993). Analysing Genre: Language Use in Professional Settings . London: Longman.
    • Flowerdew J. 1993. “ Concordancing as a tool in course design. ” System , 21/2. 213-229.
    • Swales, J. M. (1990). Genre Analysis: English in Academic and Research Settings. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    • Warschauer, M. (2000). The changing global economy and the future of English teaching. TESOL Quarterly. 34/3. 511-535.
    • (Widdowson, 1983 p. 6).
    • Lave and Wenger, 1991;
    • Gee, 2004
    • New London Group, 1996;
    • Knobel and Lankshear, 2007