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Water conservation Method
Submitted by
Himanshu Parashar
VII-A
Roll no:-21
WHY CONSERVE WATER?
1. It is a resource that is a benefit to everyone.
2. To save money. Lower consumption means lower
wat...
TWO TYPES OF PRACTICES
1. Engineering practices:
practices based on
modifications in plumbing,
fixtures, or water supply
o...
LEAK DETECTION
 Repairing leaks saves money on water
bills. The early detection of leaks also
reduces the chances that le...
WATER AUDITS
 Audits of large-volume users. Begin by
identifying the categories of water use for
the large-volume user. T...
REDUCING WATER PRESSURE
Pressure-reducing valves.
 Can be installed on street
mains, as well as individual
buildings.
 C...
WATER RECYCLING
 Water recycling is the reuse of
water for the same application for
which it was originally used.
 Facto...
WATER REUSE
 Water reuse is the use of wastewater or
reclaimed water (sometimes called
“graywater”) from one application ...
WATER REUSE
Factors that should be considered in an
industrial water reuse program include:
 Identification of water reus...
THE IMPORTANCE OF A
CLEAN ENVIRONMENT
“I would ask all of us to remember that
protecting our environment is about protecti...
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Water conservation method

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Water conservation method

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  • Why Should We Conserve Water? It is a resource that is a benefit to everyone. To save money. Lower consumption means lower water bills. To keep rates low. Maximizing current water supplies helps defer the need to develop new, more expensive sources of water. To prepare for a drought. Many areas of the country have experienced drought conditions in the past few years. Water conservation helps prepare for these worst of times. To comply with regulations. Many states and local regulators have established efficient water use regulations.
  • There are two types of practices that need to be addressed to have a successful water conservation program. The first is engineering practices. These include modifications in plumbing, fixtures, or water supply operating procedures. They may also require equipment modification or purchase. The second is behavior practices. Education is required to change the e water use habits of individuals.
  • Leak Detection An effective way to conserve water is to detect and repair leaks in a facility’s water system. Repairing leaks saves money on water bills. The early detection of leaks also reduces the chances that leaks will cause major property damage. One way to detect leaks is to use listening equipment to survey the distribution system, identify leak sounds, and pinpoint the exact locations of hidden underground leaks. As mentioned earlier, metering can also be used to help detect leaks in a system. A leak detection strategy needs to employ regular on-site testing using computer-assisted leak detection equipment, a sonic leak-detection survey, or another acceptable method for detecting leaks along water distribution mains, valves, services, and meters. Leak detection programs are especially important in facilities that have large, old, deteriorating systems.
  • Audits of large-volume users. Water audits should begin by identifying the categories of water use for the large-volume user. These may include process, sanitary, domestic, heating, cooling, outdoor, and other water uses. Second, a water audit should identify areas in which overall water use efficiency can be improved through alternative technologies or practices. Large-landscape audits. Water audits can be used for outdoor usage, as well as for indoor processes. Audits of irrigation practices can provide large-volume commercial, industrial, and public users with information about usage and usage-reduction techniques. These audits can be used in conjunction with irrigation submetering and other landscaping efficiency practices. Effective audit programs that employ water saving processes can save 10 to 20 percent of general industrial water usage. The same amount of savings can also be found for large landscape water audits. WAVE (Water Alliances for Voluntary Efficiency) is a non-regulatory water-efficiency partnership created and supported by U.S. EPA. WAVE has produced WAVE-Saver, an interactive, PC-based software tool that can help companies calculate the true incremental cost of water, create budget projections based on historical rate and occupancy patterns and to evaluate hundreds of efficiency options using “intelligent” look-up tables and data bases. Call 1-800-993-WAVE for more information on WAVE-Saver.
  • Pressure-reducing valves. A more aggressive plan may include the purchase and installation of pressure-reducing valves in street mains, as well as individual buildings. Companies might also insert flow restrictors on services at the meter. Restrictors can be sized to allow for service length, system pressure, and site elevation. Companies should seek technical assistance from their water provider to address their pressure problems and the installation of pressure-reducing valves.
  • Water recycling is the reuse of water for the same application for which it was originally used . Recycled water might require treatment before it can be used again. Factors that should be considered in a water recycling program include: Identification of water reuse opportunities Evaluation of the minimum water quality needed for a particular use Evaluation of water quality degradation resulting from the use Determination of the treatment steps, if any, that might be required to prepare the water for recycling. If given the choice, water recycling is the best use of wastewater.
  • Water Reuse Water reuse is the use of wastewater or reclaimed water (sometimes called “graywater”) from one application such as municipal wastewater treatment for another application such as landscape watering. The reused water must be used for a beneficial purpose and in accordance with applicable rules (such as local ordinances governing water reuse). Some potential applications for the reuse of wastewater or reclaimed water include other industrial uses in cooling water at power plants and oil refineries or industrial process water for such facilities as paper mills and carpet dyers, toilet flushing, dust control, construction activities, concrete mixing, and artificial lakes. Reused water can also be used in landscape irrigation, agricultural irrigation, aesthetic uses such as fountains, and fire protection.
  • Water Reuse Factors that should be considered in an industrial water reuse program include:    Identification of water reuse opportunities    Determination of the minimum water quality needed for the given use    Identification of wastewater sources that satisfy the water quality requirements    Determination of how the water can be transported to the new use The reuse of wastewater or reclaimed water is beneficial because it reduces the demands on available surface and ground waters. It also help reduce a company’s water bill. Perhaps the greatest benefit of establishing water reuse programs is their contribution in delaying or eliminating the need to expand potable water supply and treatment facilities.
  • 84 102 102 90 In closing, it is important to remember the words of Carol Browner, EPA Administrator during the Clinton Administration. She said: “ I would ask all of us to remember that protecting our environment is about protecting where we live and how we live. Let us join together to protect our health, our economy, and our communities -- so all of us and our children and our grandchildren can enjoy a healthy and a prosperous life.”
  • Transcript of "Water conservation method"

    1. 1. Water conservation Method Submitted by Himanshu Parashar VII-A Roll no:-21
    2. 2. WHY CONSERVE WATER? 1. It is a resource that is a benefit to everyone. 2. To save money. Lower consumption means lower water bills. 3. To keep rates low. Maximizing current water supplies helps defer the need to develop new, more expensive sources of water. 4. To prepare for a drought. Many areas of the country have experienced drought conditions in the past few years. Water conservation helps prepare for these worst of times. 5. To comply with regulations. Many states and local regulators have established efficient water use regulations.
    3. 3. TWO TYPES OF PRACTICES 1. Engineering practices: practices based on modifications in plumbing, fixtures, or water supply operating procedures. 2. Behavioral practices: practices based on changing water use habits.
    4. 4. LEAK DETECTION  Repairing leaks saves money on water bills. The early detection of leaks also reduces the chances that leaks will cause major property damage.  A leak detection strategy needs to employ regular on-site testing methods for detecting leaks along water distribution mains, valves, services, and meters.  Leak detection programs are especially important in facilities that have large, old, deteriorating systems.
    5. 5. WATER AUDITS  Audits of large-volume users. Begin by identifying the categories of water use for the large-volume user. These may include process, sanitary, domestic, heating, cooling, outdoor, and other water uses. Second, a water audit should identify areas in which overall water use efficiency can be improved through alternative technologies or practices.  Large-landscape audits.  Effective audit programs can save 10 to 20 percent for both general industrial water usage and for large landscape water audits.
    6. 6. REDUCING WATER PRESSURE Pressure-reducing valves.  Can be installed on street mains, as well as individual buildings.  Companies might also insert flow restrictors on services at the meter.  Seek technical assistance from your water provider on pressure-reducing valves.
    7. 7. WATER RECYCLING  Water recycling is the reuse of water for the same application for which it was originally used.  Factors that should be considered in a water recycling program include: - Identification of water reuse opportunities - Evaluation of the minimum water quality needed for a particular use - Evaluation of water quality degradation resulting from the use - Determination of the treatment steps.
    8. 8. WATER REUSE  Water reuse is the use of wastewater or reclaimed water (sometimes called “graywater”) from one application for another application.  Some potential applications include other industrial uses in cooling water at power plants and oil refineries or industrial process water for such facilities as paper mills and carpet dyers, toilet flushing, dust control, construction activities, concrete mixing, and artificial lakes.  Reused water can also be used in landscape irrigation, agricultural irrigation, aesthetic uses such as fountains, and fire protection.
    9. 9. WATER REUSE Factors that should be considered in an industrial water reuse program include:  Identification of water reuse opportunities  Determination of the minimum water quality needed for the given use  Identification of wastewater sources that satisfy the water quality requirements  Determination of how the water can be transported to the new use
    10. 10. THE IMPORTANCE OF A CLEAN ENVIRONMENT “I would ask all of us to remember that protecting our environment is about protecting where we live and how we live. Let us join together to protect our health, our economy, and our communities -- so all of us and our children and our grandchildren can enjoy a healthy and a prosperous life.” Thanks
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