Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Intro to Wikis
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Intro to Wikis

468

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
468
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Read Only Web Other name – Web 1.0 One way Web Information is controlled by publishers Read/Write Web Web 2.0 Now as easy to create as to consume Anyone can publish, change and share information Wiki Website anyone can edit If you can use Word, you can use a wiki! Visitors can see history of changes & edits Visitors can discuss information on wiki in a threaded form Example is wikipedia How can you use in classroom? Collaborate to author class texts Writing projects Coordinate group projects Sharing resources within grade/subject ePortfolio Clubs and other extra curricular activities Coordinate events Presentation tools Here to explore exisitng educational wikis, evalaute these wikis and begin creating our own wikis
  • Transcript

    • 1. Welcome Wikispaces in K–12 Education January 4, 2011 • Welcome • Read-only Web v. Read/Write Web • Wikis • Getting Started with Wikispaces • Wrap-up and Q&A Originally developed by Mark Wagner, Ph.D., President & CEO, EdTechTeam, Inc.
    • 2. Wiki for This Workshop http:// dwsintro2wikis .wikispaces.com
    • 3. Welcome Activity
      • What is the read/write web (Web 1.0)?
      • What is a wiki?
      • How could you use a wiki in your class?
    • 4. Read-only Web • Powerful resource for educators and students, but… • Information moves from publishers to consumers • Information cannot be edited • One-way Web (Web 1.0)
    • 5. Read/Write Web • It is now as easy to create as it is to consume • Anyone can publish, share, and change information online • Two-way Web (Web 2.0) • This is changing our world!
    • 6. Wikis • A wiki is a website that anyone can edit. • If you can use Word, you can use a wiki! • Visitors can see a history of changes and revert to earlier versions. • Visitors can discuss the page in a threaded forum. www.wikispaces.com
    • 7. Wikipedia • Online encyclopedia • Collaboratively authored and edited • Over 1 million users worldwide • Over 1 million articles in English • Great resource, but… • Use with caution
    • 8. Educational Wikis
      • Uses
      • Collaboratively authored class texts
      • • Writing projects
      • • Group projects
      • • Sharing resources
      • • Grade level teams
      • • Subject area teams
      • • Professional Learning Networks
      • • Clubs, PTOs, and events
      • • Presentation tools
    • 9. Benefits • Engagement and motivation • Context-embedded learning • Inquiry-driven learning • Collaborative learning • Reflection • 21 st -century skills
    • 10. Concerns • Inappropriate content • Inappropriate sharing • Threats and cyber-bullying • Intellectual property • Lack of understanding
    • 11. Wiki for This Workshop http:// dwsintro2wikis .wikispaces.com
    • 12. Activity 1: Evaluate Educational Wikis
      • • Locate an educational wiki relevant to your work
      • (examples located under Resources in the Presentation Wiki) .
      • • Evaluate the wiki based on the following criteria:
        • 1. What is a basic description of this wiki?
        • Who is the intended audience for the wiki
        • and what would they get out of it?
        • 3. Who are the intended contributors for the wiki and what would they contribute?
        • 4. How does this wiki accomplish something that only a wiki can accomplish?
        • 5. How could you adapt this a model for your own work?
      • • Post your evaluations on the Discussion tab of the Activity 1 page in the presentation wiki.
      • • Time permitting, explore your classmates’ evaluations. Reply to three of their posts.
    • 13. Activity 2: Edit a Wiki Page • Go to the Activity 2 page on the presentation wiki. • Add to and edit the page. • Play with some of the tools in the Editor toolbar .
    • 14. Activity 3: Create Your Own Wiki
      • • http:// www.wikispaces.com /site/for/teachers/
      • • Create an Account (if you haven't already)
      • • Create a Wiki
        • Create a New Page
        • Edit Page
        • Discussion
        • History
        • Notification
        • Manage Wiki
      • My Account
      • • Enter and link to the URL for your wiki on Activity 3 page of the presentation wiki.
    • 15. Reflection Activity
      • What is the most important thing you learned today?
      • What are your next steps for using wikis in your work?
      • 3. What do you want to learn more about?
    • 16. Q&A
    • 17. Activity 4: Share Your Own Wiki
      • • Post your answers on the Discussion tab of the Activity 4 page in the presentation wiki:
        • 1. What is the URL of your wiki?
        • 2. What is a basic description of your wiki?
        • 3. Who is the intended audience for the wiki and what should they get out of it?
        • 4. Who are the intended contributors for the wiki and what should they contribute?
        • 5. What multi-media have you integrated into your wiki?
        • 6. What other tools have you integrated into your wiki?
        • 7. What is one obstacle or issue you anticipated and how have you addressed it?
        • 8. What future plans do you have for your wiki?
      • • After the workshop, explore your classmates' evaluations. Reply to three of their posts.

    ×