WEBINAR: Social Media 101 for
Community Health Centres
Updated March 2015
(Originally presented March 2011)
Outline
• 45 minute presentation
– Overview of social media and how/why CHCs can
use social media
– An “on the ground” loo...
Where to begin?
Is this even relevant to what we do???
Key goals today are to
• De-mystify social media (SM)
– Better understand what they are and see through
some of the ‘noise...
OK…this isn’t so bad
after all !!!
#1: We need to make the distinction between
medium and content/use
From mental block to building blocks
#2: We need to better understand the
virtues of “Web 2.0”
From mental block to building blocks
• Blogging: short commentaries expressing your ideas and thoughts
about issues of importance to you. You control the conte...
From mental block to building blocks
#3: Deep connection between social media
and CHC values and vision
From mental block to building blocks
• SM = CHC2
The value propositions and organizational methods of
Web 2.0 and social m...
Yes, there is some work and
organizational change involved
• Where do you begin?
• Which social media tools do you use?
• ...
SM are not about doing something new. They
are about doing what you already do:
– in new ways
– in new places and spaces
–...
A few examples of what you can do
• Engage local youth around health issues on Facebook
• Ask community members for input ...
ADVOCACY: SM enable us to break traditional
chains of access and control
Some recommendations
• Schedule social media conversation(s) at your
CHC
– There needs to be a buy-in process, and ideally...
Some recommendations
• Identify and work forward from your CHC’s
current program and communications priorities
– It is imp...
Some recommendations
• Embrace the collaborative spirit of social media
and recognize this journey as a way to build
bridg...
www.swchc.on.ca
A grassroots, birkenstock-wearing, health-
promoting, bike-riding, community-lovin’
CHC uses Social Media!
Social Media 10...
Why?
Many people in the broader community
(London, Ontario) don’t understand the full
depth and breadth of our Community
H...
Why?
• More people will encounter us online than in
person. Our website and social media
presence will play an increasingl...
Why?
• Participation in online communities can promote
better communication with our colleagues,
partners, funders, the ge...
January 2010: Launched Facebook Page
http://www.facebook.com/LondonInterCommunityHealthCentre
Facebook
• Used for posting upcoming events, sharing program news,
recognizing partner agency success, links to ED Michell...
November 3, 2010
London Free Press
• Canada has the heaviest Facebook profile penetration in the world
• Facebook users ar...
May 2010: Launched new website
www.lihc.on.ca
• Complete overhaul of our Community Health
Centre’s website
• Built on a Wo...
Blog: Powered by Values
Powered by Values
• Michelle, our Executive Director, writes a weekly
post for her blog called “Powered by Values”
• Subje...
Website Analytics
• Built in Google Analytics allows us to track site
usage, where visitors come from, which pages they
vi...
Built in Google Analytics
October 2010: Launched Twitter account
http://www.twitter.com/HealthCentre
Twitter
• As of March 2015 we “follow” 590 Twitter accounts – local
and national news, fellow CHCs, local non-profit
organ...
Twitter
• We use TweetDeck to create tweets and manage our
Twitter use and Megan (our Communications Manager)
uses a Black...
We Needed a Social Media Policy
• We needed a social media policy that is informative
and provides pragmatic participation...
Sample Content
• Clear guidelines about what employees may and
may not say
• Branding information
• Rules of engagement
• ...
Other Social Media in Progress
• Youth Outreach Workers on Facebook and Twitter
• Francophone Community Developer has a
Fa...
Some other social media
supports and examples
Online Social Media for CHCs section:
– Social media 101 description
– Various social media tools and examples designed
sp...
Example from U.S. www.chc1.com
Thank you!
Scott A. Wolfe
Executive Director – Canadian Association of Community Health Centres
swolfe@cachc.ca
http://www...
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Social Media 101 for Community Health Centres: WEBINAR presentation

  1. WEBINAR: Social Media 101 for Community Health Centres Updated March 2015 (Originally presented March 2011)
  2. Outline • 45 minute presentation – Overview of social media and how/why CHCs can use social media – An “on the ground” look at social media use, planning (London InterCommunity CHC) – Some additional resources, supports and opportunities for sharing • Up to 45 minutes for questions and social media “troubleshooting”
  3. Where to begin?
  4. Is this even relevant to what we do???
  5. Key goals today are to • De-mystify social media (SM) – Better understand what they are and see through some of the ‘noise’ – See how they fit with the vision & mission of CHCs • Understand how SM can help you better achieve your CHC’s mission, vision, priorities • Leave with some tools, examples and resources to advance SM planning, use at your CHC
  6. OK…this isn’t so bad after all !!!
  7. #1: We need to make the distinction between medium and content/use From mental block to building blocks
  8. #2: We need to better understand the virtues of “Web 2.0” From mental block to building blocks
  9. • Blogging: short commentaries expressing your ideas and thoughts about issues of importance to you. You control the content, the message and the forum. Invites comments and encourages dialogue. • Micro-blogging: Tools like Twitter that allow you to share short messages (~ 140 characters) instantly informing people of news, updates and opinions. The short form enables quick and to-the- point information exchange. A great way to help steer others toward issues, news, events that matter to you. Power of the “multiplying effect”. • Social networking: Using applications like Facebook and Twitter to establish and build relationships focused around common interests, causes or events. A few Web 2.0 basics
  10. From mental block to building blocks #3: Deep connection between social media and CHC values and vision
  11. From mental block to building blocks • SM = CHC2 The value propositions and organizational methods of Web 2.0 and social media are similar to those that are deeply embedded in the CHC model and vision of health and healthcare • “Should we?” vs. “How?” The question is not so much “should we” be using SM, but how do we do so effectively and manageably?
  12. Yes, there is some work and organizational change involved • Where do you begin? • Which social media tools do you use? • How do you staff this new approach at your CHC?
  13. SM are not about doing something new. They are about doing what you already do: – in new ways – in new places and spaces – through new tools – Not just for your communication leads • Social media are tools that can and should be used by health providers, program staff and others at your CHC Golden Key
  14. A few examples of what you can do • Engage local youth around health issues on Facebook • Ask community members for input on local priorities via Twitter, Facebook, blogs, etc. • Post advocacy videos on YouTube, made with low- cost, hand-held cameras • Develop a following of local MPPs / MLAs, MPs, Regional Health Authorities, Ministers, partner agencies and others on Facebook and Twitter: gain unprecedented access to decision-makers • Join other CHCs and community partners around shared advocacy efforts
  15. ADVOCACY: SM enable us to break traditional chains of access and control
  16. Some recommendations • Schedule social media conversation(s) at your CHC – There needs to be a buy-in process, and ideally this should be at the management level. Achieving broad buy-in generally takes time, but it always starts with a conversation. – Try to identify one or more “social media ambassadors” or lead persons on your staff; individuals who can help other CHC colleagues move from “mental block to building blocks”
  17. Some recommendations • Identify and work forward from your CHC’s current program and communications priorities – It is important to anchor your social media planning and use around current priorities, and to approach SM as new tools to achieve your existing organizational goals – Among your current priorities, it is often helpful to start where there is some early buy-in to get started with SM. This way you can start small, share successes and model SM use for others at your CHC
  18. Some recommendations • Embrace the collaborative spirit of social media and recognize this journey as a way to build bridges and unite staff, volunteers, others – Reach out and identify who at your centre is already using SM; invite a broad range of staff members into the discussion – make this truly participatory! – This may be an opportunity to build team morale and collaboration! – You may not know it, but you could already have SM pros in your midst!
  19. www.swchc.on.ca
  20. A grassroots, birkenstock-wearing, health- promoting, bike-riding, community-lovin’ CHC uses Social Media! Social Media 101 Webinar
  21. Why? Many people in the broader community (London, Ontario) don’t understand the full depth and breadth of our Community Health Centre’s programs, services and mandate.
  22. Why? • More people will encounter us online than in person. Our website and social media presence will play an increasingly strong role in influencing perceptions of our services and our “brand.” • (We get about 2500+ unique visitors to our website each month)
  23. Why? • Participation in online communities can promote better communication with our colleagues, partners, funders, the general public, traditional and non-traditional media and other community stakeholders. • If we are truly an adaptive organization that is externally focused, we must adopt solutions that help us communicate effectively and efficiently.
  24. January 2010: Launched Facebook Page http://www.facebook.com/LondonInterCommunityHealthCentre
  25. Facebook • Used for posting upcoming events, sharing program news, recognizing partner agency success, links to ED Michelle Hurtubise’s blog, posting pictures or “house keeping” details such as hours of operation. • 1000 people have “liked” the site as of March 2015 • Built in analytics capability allows us to see site impressions, feedback rate, etc. • Have used Facebook ads with limited success • Facebook is consistently one of the top 10 referrers to our website (i.e., one of the top 10 sites that people access before visiting our primary website. “push-tool”)
  26. November 3, 2010 London Free Press • Canada has the heaviest Facebook profile penetration in the world • Facebook users are making connections with public entities three times faster than they are with traditional friends. • Research group Nielsen found that Facebook users are 68% more likely to remember seeing an advertisement if it’s shared by a friend. They were 100% more likely to remember the message in the advertisement and 300% more likely to purchase the product. • “Facebook is effective word of mouth marketing. And for the very first time you can do it to scale,” • Starbucks for instance has roughly 2.7 million hits on its corporate website per month whereas its corporate Facebook page gets 16.3 million hits per month.
  27. May 2010: Launched new website www.lihc.on.ca • Complete overhaul of our Community Health Centre’s website • Built on a Wordpress platform • Features latest news items, photo galleries, a blog, fillable forms, traditional static pages, a survey feature & more! • 100% administered by our CommunityHealth Centre – flexible and adaptive
  28. Blog: Powered by Values
  29. Powered by Values • Michelle, our Executive Director, writes a weekly post for her blog called “Powered by Values” • Subject matter runs from national news items to very local issues to Health Centre programming • Attempt to link to other organizations, sources of information/research and illustrate the photos if possible
  30. Website Analytics • Built in Google Analytics allows us to track site usage, where visitors come from, which pages they view and how long they stay on the site • In past months, we’ve had 1700+ unique visitors • Since we launched the site, we’ve had 340 people join our mailing list, and 150 people complete the application form to become a volunteer at our centre
  31. Built in Google Analytics
  32. October 2010: Launched Twitter account http://www.twitter.com/HealthCentre
  33. Twitter • As of March 2015 we “follow” 590 Twitter accounts – local and national news, fellow CHCs, local non-profit organizations, LHINs, politicians, formal and informal community animators, journalists, “special interest/advocacy groups” • As of March 2015 we are “followed by” 1650 Twitter accounts – including Ontario Minister of Health Eric Hoskins; our Local Health Integration Network; Premier Kathleen Wynne; London Free Press journalists; local city councilors; individuals and local non-profits
  34. Twitter • We use TweetDeck to create tweets and manage our Twitter use and Megan (our Communications Manager) uses a Blackberry for “live” tweeting and photo sharing from events • We use Twitter primarily to: – Recognize partner organizations – Drive people to new content on our website (events, jobs, blog posts) – Comment on local news stories that cover topics relevant to the communities we serve – Join provincial advocacy efforts – Report back, informally, to our funder
  35. We Needed a Social Media Policy • We needed a social media policy that is informative and provides pragmatic participation guidelines. • Internal component: guidelines for employees participating in online communities hosted by our agencies or other agencies • External component: guidelines for individuals posting to our platform • Basic do’s and don’ts… our code of ethics online
  36. Sample Content • Clear guidelines about what employees may and may not say • Branding information • Rules of engagement • Transparency
  37. Other Social Media in Progress • Youth Outreach Workers on Facebook and Twitter • Francophone Community Developer has a Facebook page en francais • Grit Uplifted has a blog for publication of the writings of our clients who are homeless – they also have a Facebook page to drive people to the blog • New Facebook page just launched for our new Ethno-Racial Youth Mentoring Program
  38. Some other social media supports and examples
  39. Online Social Media for CHCs section: – Social media 101 description – Various social media tools and examples designed specifically for CHCs – Links to external “social media for healthcare” sites and resources – Link to the global discussion forum “CHC Chat” – these include regular discussion of social media use by CHCs www.cachc.ca
  40. Example from U.S. www.chc1.com
  41. Thank you! Scott A. Wolfe Executive Director – Canadian Association of Community Health Centres swolfe@cachc.ca http://www.twitter.com/CACHC_ACCSC Megan Cornwell Communications Manager – London InterCommunity Health Centre mcornwell@lihc.on.ca http://www.twitter.com/HealthCentre Mary MacNutt Policy and Communications Manager – Association of Ontario Health Centres marym@aohc.org http://www.twitter.com/AOHC_ACSO

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