• Save
Pediatric RA r
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Pediatric RA r

on

  • 1,325 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,325
Views on SlideShare
1,325
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
5
Downloads
0
Comments
2

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
  • if there is no possibility to download the presentation, the value of presentation is diminished very much!!! almost '0'!!!
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
  • wow
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Pediatric RA r Pediatric RA r Presentation Transcript

  • Embryonic  b i Adult level  Fetal period birth period (9‐12 months) Horsetail  Co2‐3 S1‐L5 L3 L1 p j projection Dural sac  Co2‐3 S3‐S4 S3‐S4 S1‐S2 ending
  • Main features of the Pediatric Period and Their  Implications Regarding Regional Anesthesia Features of Infants  Clinical Consequences and  Regional Anesthetic and Young Children Specific Dangers Implications Incomplete  Easier penetration of local  Diluted solution more  myelinazation of nerve  anesthetics effective, reduced latency , y fibers fib Delayed metabolism of  Enzyme immaturity Decrease reinjection doses aminoamides Lower termination of  Approach epidural space  spinal cord and dural Danger of spinal damage below L4 below L4 sac
  • Main features of the Pediatric Period and Their  Implications Regarding Regional Anesthesia Features of Infants  Clinical Consequences  Regional Anesthetic g and Young Children and Specific Dangers p g Implications p Incomplete ossification  Danger of lesion of  Use short and short‐beveled of vertebrae ossification nuclei and  needles; avoid use of too  crossing of cartilaginous  thin needles bone Sacral vertebrae not  Existence of sacral  Posterior sacral epidural  fused interspaces approach possible Delayed development  Cervical lordosis (3‐6 mos)  (3 6 mos)  Change orientation of  of spinal curves Lumbar lordosis (8‐9 mos) epidural needles as needed
  • Main features of the Pediatric Period and Their  Implications Regarding Regional Anesthesia Features of Infants and  Clinical Consequences  Regional Anesthetic Young Children and Specific Dangers Implications Change in axial orientation  Identification of sacral  Caudal approaches more  of coccyx, no growth of  hiatus becomes more  difficult above 6‐8 years of  sacral hiatus difficult with growing age Epidural fat becomes  Reduced spread of local  Caudal anesthesia less  progressively less anesthetics above 6 years  effective above 6 8 years o effective above 6‐8 years o Increased spread of local  Less volume required for  Loose attachment of  anesthetics along nerve  peripheral nerve blocks  perineural sheaths paths with danger of  but larger doses for central  distant nerve blocks blocks 
  • Main features of the Pediatric Period and Their  Implications Regarding Regional Anesthesia Features of Infants and  Clinical Consequences  Regional Anesthetic g Young Children and Specific Dangers p g Implications p cardiac output and local   systemic absorption of   duration of effects blood flow local anesthetics  effectiveness of  epinephrine h Sympathetic immaturity,  Hemodynamic stability  Preloading with saline   cardiac vagal adaptability during central block  irrelevant; vasoactive procedures agents not required
  • Main General Contraindications to  Reigonal Anesthesia 1. Coagulation disorders including anticoagulant therapy (central blocks mainly) g g g py ( y) 2. Infection at the puncture site (any block) 3. Septicaemia and meningitis (central blocks) p g ( ) 4. Uncorrected hypovolemia (central blocks) 5. True allergy to local anesthetics (all blocks), a very unusual condition in pediatrics 6. Major (not minor) vertebral anomalies (central blocks) 7 7. Degenerative axonal diseases 8. Psychoneurotic disorders 9. Parental refusal 10. Patients at risk of compression in closed fascial compartments if appropriate  postoperative supervision cannot be guaranteed
  • Complications of Regional Anesthesia Complications Related to the Device Used Complications Related to the Device Used Block Needle Bl k N dl Direct trauma to nerve trunks Vascular damage Spinal and epidural compressive hematoma  potentially resulting in paraplegia i ll li i l i
  • Complications of Regional Anesthesia Complications Related to the Device Used Complications Related to the Device Used Technique of nerve/space location Technique of nerve/space location Electrical burns Nerve trauma while seeking for paresthesias Complications due to the medium used for a loss‐or‐resistance  technique Saline: dilution, increase in injected volume of local anesthetic , j Air: transitory headache, patchy anesthesia due to epidural  bubbles, lumbar compression, multiradicular syndrome,  subcutaneous cervical emphysema, venous air embolism p y , Headache (dural puncture)
  • Complications of Regional Anesthesia Complications Related to the Device Used Complications Related to the Device Used Catheters Misplacement, kinking, knotting, rupture p g g p Delayed lumbar stenosis due to a retained  catheter tip p Secondary migration (subarachnoid space,  blood vessel, subdural space, paravertebral , p ,p space)
  • Complications of Regional Anesthesia Complications of Regional Anesthesia Complications Related to Faulty Technique Complications Related to Faulty Technique Bacterial contamination Epidural abscess Epidural abscess Meningitis Arachnoiditis Radiculopathies di l hi Discitis Vertebral osteitis Unsafe technique of injection Intense headache Loss of consciousness Intracranial hypertension Coma
  • Complications of Regional Anesthesia Complications of Regional Anesthesia Complications Related to Faulty Technique Complications Related to Faulty Technique Injection in the wrong space Injection in the wrong space Subcutaneous or intramuscular (block failure) Total spinal anesthesia Total spinal anesthesia Subdural block Inappropriate distribution of anesthesia Inappropriate distribution of anesthesia
  • Complications of Regional Anesthesia Complications due to the Anesthetic Solution Local toxicity Use of wrong solution (permanent neurologic damage) Transient (or long‐lasting) neurologic complications with  intrathecal use of lidocaine Complications due to preservatives, antioxidants, or  Complications due to preservatives antioxidants or epinephrine Systemic toxicity S i i i Neurlogic toxicity (seizures, vascular collapse, respiratory  arrest) ) Cardiac toxicity mainly with bupivacaine (arrhythmias, major  vascular collapse) Methhemoglobinemia M thh l bi i
  • Complications of Regional Anesthesia p g Complications due to the Solution Narcotics  Nausea and vomiting Pruritus Urinary retention Respiratory depression Constipation Epinephrine Ischemic disorders Other Adverse Effects Hypotension (sympathetic blockade) Anterior spinal artery syndrome  Flaring of latent infections (Guillain‐Barre syndrome, herpes virus infections) Unmasking latent neurologic diseases (spinal cord compression, cerebral  tumor, angioma, epidural abscess)
  • Emergency Treatment of Seizures  during a Regional Block Procedure 1. Treat immediately with oxygen  i di l i h 2. If convulsions persist: a. IV  hi IV thiopental 4 mg/kg l    /k b. Short‐acting muscle relaxant: either Succinylcholine (1.5 –   /k ) S i l h li (   2 mg/kg) Atracurium (0.5 mg/kg) c. T h l i t b ti   d  Tracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation h i l  til ti d. IV diazepam (0.1 mg/kg) or IV midazolam (0.05 mg/kg)
  • Emergency Treatment of Cardiac Complications  during a Regional Block Procedure d ring a Regional Block Proced re Initial Treatment (Common for all Cardiac Complications) 1. Supplement with oxygen (facemask)  then tracheal  Supplement with oxygen (facemask), then tracheal  intubation and assisted ventilation with oxygen 2. Restore hemodynamics ( t 2 R t  h d i (external cardiac massage if  l  di   g  if  necessary) 3. Prevent metabolic acidosis with sodium bicarbonate: Semimolar (4.2%) into a central vein: 2 mg/kg/10 min Isotonic (1.4%) into a peripheral vein: 6ml/kg/min
  • Emergency Treatment of Cardiac Complications  during a Regional Block Procedure d ring a Regional Block Proced re Inotropic Support if Hemodynamics not Restored 1. IV atropine: 0.02 mg/kg (maximum 0.6mg) 2. IV vasoactive agents: either Epinephrine: 0.1 mg/kg pf a 1:10,000 solution (check ECG  Epinephrine: 0 1 mg/kg pf a 1:10 000 solution (check ECG  a. for V‐tach or V‐fib) b. b Dopamine or dobutamine (2 10 g/kg/min) (2‐10 g/kg/min) c. Occasionally: isoprenaline 0.1 g/kg 3. Calcium chloride: 10‐30 mg/kg
  • Emergency Treatment of Cardiac Complications  during a Regional Block Procedure In Case of Ventricular Tachycardia or Fibrillation 1. Defibrillation: 3 J/kg (up to a maximum of 6 J/kg) 2. Antiarrhythmic agents: a. IV bretylium tosilate (5 mg/kg; repeat injections up to a max:  30 mg/kg) b. Clonidine: 0.01 mg/kg (single‐bolus dose), then IV  Clonidine: 0.01 mg/kg (single bolus dose), then IV  c. Dobutamine: 5 g/kg/min 3. Anticonvulsants: either a. IV diazepam (0.1‐0.2 mg/kg) b. IV midazolam (0.05‐0.1 mg/kg) c. Or IV phenytoin (5 mg/kg over a period of 10 min) p y (5 g/ g p ) d. Avoid thiopental 4. Inotropic support: either or both a. IV atropine: 0.02 mg/kg (not exceeding 0.6 mg) / ( ) b. IV dobutamine: 5 g/kg/min (immediately after clonidine injection) ( p) p p c. Avoid (or stop) epinephrine 5. Amrinone
  • Factors to be Considered for Selecting the Most  Suitable Regional Block Procedure 1. 1 Distribution of anesthesia covering the operative field  sites of grafts  and  covering the operative field, sites of grafts, and  placement of tourniquets 2. Easy management of intra‐ and postop pain without discontinuation of  technique 3. Physical condition of the patient 4. 4 Techniques that do not delay early ambulation, return to normal activity  T h i  th t d   t d l   l   b l ti   t  t   l  ti it   and/or discharge from hospital when available 5 5. Effectiveness appropriate to the severity of the surgery: avoid central  pp p y g y blocks for minor surgery 6. Verify the suitability of the puncture site (no lesion or infection) 7. Patient’s positioning is safe and tolerable (avoid moving patients with  ( spinal trauma, extensive wounds, painful conditions at pressure points) 8. Practitioner is experienced in the technique
  • The Five Golden Rules of Safe Injection of a Local  j Anesthetic During Any Type of Regional Block Procedure  Safety Rules Expected Result Abnormal Response Blood reflux (vascular  p penetration), CSF reflux (with  ), ( Aspiration test before any  A i i    b f     No reflux of any biologic fluid  N   fl   f   bi l i  fl id  saline‐LOR, verify absence of  injection (except for spinal anesthesia) glucose before assuming the  q ) liquid to be saline) ST segment elevation Increase in T‐wave amplitude No change in ECG tracings  1‐2 ml test dose with 1 g/kg  g g Tachycardia (often preceeded by  ( within 30‐60 sec (during and  within 30 60 sec (during and  epinephrine bradycardia) after injection) Increase in systolic blood  pressure “crash” injection would lead to  Slow injection rate  Fluid and smooth injection of  high peak plasma concentration  (<10 ml/min) the local anesthetic and systemic toxicity
  • The Five Golden Rules of Safe Injection of a Local  j Anesthetic During Any Type of Regional Block Procedure  Safety Rules Expected Result Abnormal Response Verify that usual  y Variable or unusually  y Constant pressure and  C t t    d  resistance is felt  high resistance  normal feeling felt  throughout the injection  inconsistent feelings  g j during injection procedure d during injection d i  i j i Blood reflux (secondary  Repeat aspiration  No reflux of any biologic  migration into a vessel) during injection (at least  fluid (except for spinal  CSF reflux (secondary  every 5 ml) and before  anesthesia) displacement within the  each reinjection subarachnoid space)
  • Technique of Spinal Anesthesia Technique of Spinal Anesthesia
  • Technique of Spinal Anesthesia Technique of Spinal Anesthesia
  • Technique of Spinal Anesthesia Technique of Spinal Anesthesia Device 24‐25 G spinal needle  50mm long (infants & young children) 100mm (adolescents) Local Anesthetic Main: 0.5% bupivacaine, hyperbaric or isobaric Precaution: i Avoid any tilting of the patient, especially head down positioning after the  spinal solution has been injected for 1 hr at least p j
  • Selection and Doses of Usual Local Anesthetics Administered for Spinal Anesthesia in Infants and  Children Local Anesthetic 0‐5 kg 5‐15 kg >15kg 1% hyperbaric  0.5 mg/kg 0.4 mg/kg 0.3 mg/kg tetracaine (0.05 ml/kg) (0.04 ml/kg) (0.03 ml/kg) 5% hyperbaric  2.5 mg/kg 2 mg/kg 1.5 mg/kg lidocaine (0.05 ml/kg) (0.04 ml/kg) (0.03 ml/kg) 0.5% hyperbaric  0.5 mg/kg 0.4 mg/kg 0.3 mg/kg p bupivacaine ( (0.1 ml/kg) g) (0.08 ml/kg) ( g) (0.06 ml/kg) ( g) 0.5% isobaric  0.5 mg/kg 0.4 mg/kg 0.3 mg/kg bupivacaine (0.1 ml/kg) (0 1 ml/kg) (0.08 ml/kg) (0 08 ml/kg) (0.06 ml/kg) (0 06 ml/kg)
  • Technique of Caudal Anesthesia Technique of Caudal Anesthesia
  • Technique of Caudal Anesthesia q Devices  Main: short‐bevel, 22‐24 G and 30mm long needle with  obturator Alternate: lumbar tap needle with obturator lumbar tap needle with obturator Occasional: 22‐24 G short IV needle, 2‐22 G epidural needle  for catheter insertion Local anesthetic Main: 0.25% bupivacaine, 0.5% lidocaine Additives: epinephrine, clonidine (1g/kg) morphine (30g/kg)
  • Technique of Caudal Anesthesia Technique of Caudal Anesthesia
  • Recommended Volume of Local Anesthetic for  Caudal Anesthesia according to Armitage Upper Limit of Sensory  Recommended Volume  Blockade (ml/kg) High sacral 0.5 High lumbar 1.0 Midthoracic 1.25
  • Technique of Lumbar Epidural  Anesthesia
  • Technique of Lumbar Epidural  Anesthesia Distance to the epidural space i h id l 1mm/kg between 6 mos and 10 yrs of age Volume  First / Single injection: >10 yrs (Schulte‐Steinberg formula):  V (ml per spinal segment) = age (in yrs) / 10 <10 yrs: 1 ml/kg up to 20 ml Repeated injections: Same volume but half the concentration Continuous infusion: f 0.3‐0.5 mg/kg 0.125% (or 0.1%) bupivacaine
  • Technique of Lumbar Epidural  Anesthesia Devices Tuohy needle: 22G and 30mm long (infants) 20G and 50mm long(children up to 10yrs) 20G and 50mm long(children up to 10yrs) 19 or 18G and 70‐90mm long (teenagers) Appropriate epidural catheter LOR syringe: plastic or glass LOR medium: CO2, saline, air  Local anesthetic Main: 0.25% bupivacaine, 0.5% lidocaine, 0.2 1% ropivacaine Main: 0 25% bupivacaine 0 5% lidocaine 0 2‐1% ropivacaine Additives: epinephrine, clonidine (1 g/kg), morphine (30 g/kg)
  • UPPER EXTREMITY CONDUCTION  NERVE BLOCKS For surgery for the upper limb  Axillary approaches are preferred to supraclavicular approaches Contraindications bilateral blockade bilateral blockade marked respiratory insufficiency due to the potential danger of  pneumothorax and phrenic nerve palsy The parascalene approach, however, does not have the same limitations, as  the technique does not threaten any vital organs, especially the apical  the technique does not threaten any vital organs especially the apical pleura.
  • UPPER EXTREMITY CONDUCTION  NERVE BLOCKS SUPRACLAVICULAR BRACHIAL PLEXUS BLOCKS Complications lesions of the vertebral artery  p penetration into the cervical spinal canal p Puncture of the great vessels of the neck Compression leading to ischemia of the limb ‐ when large volumes of local anesthetic are injected Pneumothorax
  • Techniques of Supraclavicular Approaches to the  Brachial Plexus Chassaignac’s Parascalene Approach tubercle Devices Clavicle  Short‐bevel 21‐23G  21 23G 30‐50mm long Insulated nerve stimulator 0.4 1mA nerve stimulator 0 4‐1mA Volume  1 ml/kg (max: 30 ml) Junction of the upper 2/3 and lower 1/3 of the  pp /3 /3 line joining the midpoint of the clavicle and  Chassaignac’s tubercle
  • Technique of Axillary Brachial Plexus Block Technique of Axillary Brachial Plexus Block Position: Dorsal decubitus,  , arm supinated and abducted to 90o angle to the chest Landmarks  Pectoralis major muscle major muscle,  coracobrachialis muscle,  axillary and then brachial  artery
  • Technique of Axillary Brachial Plexus Block Technique of Axillary Brachial Plexus Block Puncture site Puncture site 2. Trans‐ coracobrachialis approach 1. Classical approach
  • Technique of Axillary Brachial Plexus Block Technique of Axillary Brachial Plexus Block Devices  Main: insulated short‐bevel needles (21‐23G, 25‐50mm long) Alternate: 12‐20G IV‐like cannula Volume  First / Single injection: 0.5 ml/kg (up to 20 ml) Repeat injections: 0.3‐0.5 ml/kg (up to 12.5 ml) of 1% lidocaine Continuous infusion: 0 1 0 125% l i b i C ti i f i 0.1‐0.125% plain bupivacaine;  i 0.5 ml/hr/yr (max: 7.5 ml/hr)
  • PROXIMAL SCIATIC NERVE BLOCKS PROXIMAL SCIATIC NERVE BLOCKS • for all surgery involving the lower extremity  p y below the knee, especially at ankle and foot  levels • have no specific contraindications have no specific contraindications
  • Techniques of Proximal Sciatic Nerve Blocks Technique Anterior Approach Short‐bevel, 21‐23G and 50‐ 150mm long, insulated  150mm long  insulated  Devices  needle; nerve stimulator 1‐ 1.5mA Do sa decub tus, eg Dorsal decubitus, leg  Position  slightly rotated laterally Inguinal ligament and  Landmarks  greater trochanter of femur Parallel line to inguinal  ligament, vertical line  Puncture site dropped from union medial  1/3 with lateral 2/3 of  /   ith l t l  /   f  inguinal ligament Vertical, pointing to medial  Insertion route border of femur Volume  1 ml/kg (max: 30 ml) Area of  Sciatic nerve, posterior  anesthesia femoral cutaneous nerve Inadvertent puncture of  Complications  femoral vessels
  • Techniques of Proximal Sciatic Nerve Blocks Technique Lateral Approach Short‐bevel, 21‐23G and  50‐150mm long,  50‐150mm long   Devices  insulated needle; nerve  stimulator 1‐1.5mA Do sa decub tus, eg Dorsal decubitus, leg  Position  slightly rotated medially Greater trochanter of  Landmarks  femur Puncture site 1‐2cm below trochanter Horizontal, pointing to  Insertion route lower border of femur Volume  1 ml/kg (max: 30 ml) Area of  Sciatic nerve, posterior  anesthesia femoral cutaneous nerve Complications  No specific complication
  • Technique of Ilioinguinal / iliohypogastric Nerve Block q g / yp g