2014 beacon-tools-for-science
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2014 beacon-tools-for-science

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    2014 beacon-tools-for-science 2014 beacon-tools-for-science Presentation Transcript

    • Free and Easy to Use Tools to Make Your Research, Data, and Code More Accessible Titus Brown ctb@msu.edu
    • Maintaining academic Internet presence Goals: • Easy to find correct, up to date information. • Some evidence that you are an articulate human being is not usually a bad idea. – Grad school application essay; – Post-doc statement of purpose; – Faculty research statement; …make sure everything has dates on it, somewhere obvious.
    • What do you get when you google yourself?
    • Web sites are great, but hard to maintain…
    • Maintaining academic Internet presence Goals: • Easy to find correct, up to date information. • Some evidence that you are an articulate human being is not usually a bad idea. – Grad school application essay; – Post-doc statement of purpose; – Faculty research statement; …make sure everything has dates on it, somewhere obvious.
    • Google Scholar! Automatically updated lists of your publications and online materials. • Totally awesome. • Completely free. • The first place I go to find someone’s papers & evaluate their “impact.” • Also: good scholarly literature search; personal library; suggestion/recommendation engine.
    • Google Scholar automatically finds accessible versions of your papers
    • …also has a “library” feature, for maintaining paper collections.
    • …and a “recommender” system…
    • TODO: Google Scholar • Go “claim” (enable) your profile. • Make sure that all of your papers are accessible through Google Scholar. • Look at the library, recommender, and alerts features.
    • Note: provide link in your CV!
    • Figshare Figshare is a repository for digital objects that provides citation handles for them. • A place to dump “digital objects” and receive DOIs for them. • Somewhat surprisingly, the consensus location for data sets w/no other home.
    • …I put my blog posts here.
    • TODO: figshare • Go create an account; upload anything you want to share in a citable manner (papers, blog posts, posters, figures, data sets). • Hint, NSF asks for your data products on your BioSketch… • Note: there are default limits on data set size for upload, but they can be waived easily. • Note: Code is a special issue, with integration w/github now a possibility.
    • GitHub • A place to collaboratively work on code (openly or not). • N.B. Avida and khmer are both on github.
    • Issue tracking, merge requests, etc.
    • TODO: github • If you are a programmer, create a (free) account. http://github.com/ctb/ • Free private repos for academics are available, too. • If you are in a lab with lots of other programmers, think about creating a (free) organization. http://github.com/ged-lab/ • Put some code there, maybe? Note: github.com/beacon-center/
    • ImpactStory
    • Slideshare
    • Thanks! Any questions? Note: this presentation is on slideshare 