Make Some Noise –What kind of Noise are YOU making?  Engaging, Embracing and Practicing Diversity
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Make Some Noise –What kind of Noise are YOU making? Engaging, Embracing and Practicing Diversity

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This is a presentation for the California Library Association Conference in Long Beach, CA. on November 4, 2013. Presented by members of the SJSU/School of Library and Information Science - Diversity ...

This is a presentation for the California Library Association Conference in Long Beach, CA. on November 4, 2013. Presented by members of the SJSU/School of Library and Information Science - Diversity Committee.

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  • The San Jose State University School of Library & Information Science (SLIS) is proud to have ties to several communities that provide leadership in the advancement of diversity. Those communities include our home institution, San Jose State University (SJSU), the American Library Association (ALA), and the Association for Library & Information Science Educators (ALISE). SJSU’s Diversity Master Plan defines two key terms:Diversity: the active appreciation, engagement, and support of ALL campus members in terms of their backgrounds, identities, and experiences (as constituted by gender, socioeconomic class, political perspective, age, race, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, disability, regional origin, nationality, occupation, language, among others, and the intersection of these aspects). (*This definition emerged from SJSU campus members via focus groups).Inclusive Excellence: an institutional commitment to create and sustain a context of diversity through which all members thrive, feel valued, and attain personal and professional success. One specific focus here is to utilize diversity as an educational resource and knowledge domain for students and as a central ingredient for their academic success.Along similar lines to SJSU’s Diversity Master Plan, the ALA Office for Accreditation “promotes diversity and inclusiveness in library and information studies education” as part of its mission to serve “the general public, students, employers, and library and information studies Master's programs through the promotion and advancement of education in library and information studies.” Advancing diversity via inclusive excellence is likewise a central and critical component of SLIS’ approach to educating the next generation of information professionals.Along similar lines to SJSU’s Diversity Master Plan, the ALA Office for Accreditation “promotes diversity and inclusiveness in library and information studies education” as part of its mission to serve “the general public, students, employers, and library and information studies Master's programs through the promotion and advancement of education in library and information studies.” Advancing diversity via inclusive excellence is likewise a central and critical component of SLIS’ approach to educating the next generation of information professionals.But why is advancing diversity so important to the missions of universities, professional library & information science organizations, and LIS educators such as SLIS? The Association of Library and Information Science Educator’s (ALISE) recently approved a Diversity Statement in which Clara Chu describes several benefits to advancing diversity:Enhances access, attracts and retains diverse membership/personnel. Promotes equity and equal opportunity in the organization that lead to better membership satisfaction.Facilitates engagement among diverse people that enhances the educational, organizational and scholarly experiences. Promotes personal growth and enriches the organization and community. Introduces diverse ideas, perspectives, experiences and expertise that lead to improved, informed, creative and innovative problem solving and decision making. Opens up new opportunities and modes of discovery, pedagogy and practice. Fosters mutual respect by recognizing and valuing differences and commonalities, resulting in cross-cultural understanding. Prepares professionals and leaders to work in an expanding, competitive global society. Makes for a robust and relevant organization in a diverse society.
  • The SLIS Diversity Committee is charged with fostering discussion and soliciting input about diversity issues from students, staff, and faculty to improve SLIS programs, processes, and activities. Committee members include one tenure/tenure-track faculty chair, 5 full-time faculty members, 1 part-time faculty representative, 1 alumni representative, and 1 student representative.The group’s primary role is to organize and drive departmental activities for the advancement of diversity. The Diversity Committee has several core responsibilities as defined by SLIS: Foster discussion and solicit input about diversity issues from students, staff, and faculty to improve SLIS programs, processes, and activities.Plan one Colloquium a year on a diversity topic (in coordination with Colloquium Coordinator).Recommend and plan additional diversity activities for SLIS.Welcome and mentor SLIS Spectrum scholars.Build relationships outside of the School (within the University, in the Silicon Valley, other national and global relationships).Many of these responsibilities were met via the design and development of the activities described below. One notable effort has been the Diversity Committee’s survey of faculty regarding diversity in professional activities and teaching.

Make Some Noise –What kind of Noise are YOU making? Engaging, Embracing and Practicing Diversity Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Make Some Noise – What kind of Noise are YOU making? Engaging, Embracing and Practicing Diversity Panel Members Sophia Duran Arglenda Friday Sharon Tani Patty Wong Elizabeth Wrenn-Estes California Library Association November 4, 2013
  • 2. Why is Advancing Diversity Important?
  • 3. Organizing: The SLIS Diversity Committee • • • • Foster discussion and solicit input about diversity issues. Plan one Colloquium a year on a diversity topic. Recommend and plan additional diversity activities for SLIS. Welcome and mentor SLIS Spectrum scholars. • Build relationships outside of the School.
  • 4. Diversity Checklist AS An Assessment Tool Arglenda Friday, JD, MLIS Instructor San Jose State University School of Library and Information Science
  • 5. Approaches to Diversity Assessment • Understand that diversity can manifest itself in many ways. • Gauge the degree of diversity in existing programs, activities, collections and services, and revise them to enhance or promote inclusion • Create a checklist or chart to evaluate diversity in library community or service area: • Identify diversity variables for your community • Assess the 'degrees' of inclusion by activity (programs, services or collections). • Customize checklist to use characteristics that better define the demographics of the user population
  • 6. Creating a Diversity Checklist • Conduct user study or review census data to determine characteristics of population of users. • Insert findings from user study or census data into the Diversity Checklist. • Consult with Community Gatekeepers and Representatives from target populations. • Create or revise program, service, or diversify collection using findings from Diversity Checklist . • Present a pilot project or program to see assess degree of diversity and inclusion. • Evaluate success of activity. 6
  • 7. Degrees of Inclusion • Review existing activities for degrees of inclusion • Use a rating system or actual count in determining the “degrees” of inclusion: • Count the actual number of titles or activities, OR calculate as a percentage of the total number of titles in the collection or total number of programs • Possible Rating System • • • • Minimal Fair Moderate High
  • 8. Checklist - Variables •  Abilities/Disabilities  Age  Appearance  Class/Social Status  Communication  Culture  Educational Status  Employment  Ethnicity  Family Composition  Gender Identity  Language/Dialects  Marketing/Outreach  Nationality/National Origin  Race  Religion  Sexual Orientation  Special Populations
  • 9. Example of Checklist Chart Items/ Variables Degree of Inclusion or Diversity - PROGRAMS Actual or % Language Accent/Dialect Communication Styles Cultural Aspects (formal/informal) Literacy levels Oral/Written Vocabulary Minimal Fair Moderate High Other/ Total
  • 10. Applying to Activities – ESL YOUTH • Programs – for ESL/ELL Young Adults • Research demographics - 20% of your population • Note characteristics - languages (Chinese, Spanish) • Count number of programs per group and language - Zero • Services • Homework Assistance - age (only for ages 5-12 years) • Assistance in other languages - English only • Computer Instruction - English only; 10th grade reading level • Collections – Diversification by language – 2% of collection – Diversification by literacy levels - No 10
  • 11. Other Criteria to Consider  Cost of implementation or changes  Working with Collaborators or Partners or Community Gatekeepers in all phases  Include in planning  Include in implementation  Include in debriefing  Using “pilot projects” or doing a trial run  Importance of evaluation of the proposed changes  Feedback from all participants  Using evaluation for funding/grants 11
  • 12. Questions?
  • 13. Six Most Common Diversity Opportunities Facing Public (and Other ) Libraries Today Patty Wong, MLIS County Librarian Yolo County Library Instructor, SJSU/SLIS
  • 14. 1. Staff Development • What do I do with the staff I have now?Preparation– creating a culture that embraces Inclusion – Strength based model www.strengthfinder.org – Staff engagement – Yolo County’s ONWARD! Program – Youth development www.ydnetwork.org – Building capacity: cross mentoring, cross training, special projects, Inclusion training
  • 15. 2. Human Resources: Recruitment • How do I build an organization that can recruit and reliably retain diverse talent? (HR, management team, headhunters, library leaders, fellow directors) • Use of language: Looking for skills and experience working with communities of color (multilingual or multicultural experience preferred) • Who do I partner with to reach a greater depth and breadth? (ethnic affiliates, religious communities, businesses, community groups, other library recruitments) • Inclusive recruitment plan (conferences, e-lists and social media, outreach, newspaper/radio, job hotlines) • Internal training program for panel members • Change the criteria and the exam questions
  • 16. Human Resources: Retention and Promotion • • • • • • • • • • Mentoring internally and externally Training and opportunities Feedback, high touch, coaching Bilingual pay Scholarship resources Matching funds – tuition reimbursement Conference support Speaking opportunities and special projects Committee work Making it count - reputation
  • 17. 3. Creating Sustainability: Operations • Common understanding of Inclusion amongst staff, volunteers, Friends, Library Advisory Board, governance structure, community (training, performance appraisals, all documents, website) • Staff as County and Library Ambassadors (performance appraisals, expectations) • Collections and programs and services that are community based and community driven (10% of the materials budget allocated to international languages and ELL; systemwide programming – Dia de los Ninos) • Outreach and in-reach program
  • 18. 4. Mission and Strategic Vision • Refreshed to be inclusive and timeless – and community centered • Tactical Plan – Yolo County Board of Supervisors priorities – Collaborate to Maximize Success • Changing the culture – examine Values (Library work is community work) • Communication Plan
  • 19. 5. Resource and Funding Support • How does my organization become a trusted and respected Inclusive organization with limited funding and few resources? (seek funds and support elsewhere: grants for staff and allies development, cross training, Infopeople, SJSU SLIS and other higher ed.) • Engaged internal leadership • Like minded partners with opportunities • Creation of ONWARD! Staff Development Committee (high level donation) • Internship creation
  • 20. 6. Turning Challenge Into Opportunity • Complaints become opportunities for community engagement – Youth Library cards ages 0-5 – Library card registration – gender neutral – Staffing composition – additional recruitment channels
  • 21. Every Voice Makes a Difference! Anyone who thinks they are too small to be effective….has never been in bed with a mosquito.
  • 22. Questions?
  • 23. Technology Tools for Specialized Client Groups In Public and Other Libraries Sophia Duran MLIS Student San Jose State University School of Library and Information Science
  • 24. Groups • • • • Visually Impaired Patrons Hearing Impaired Patrons Learning Impaired Patrons Mobility Impaired Patrons
  • 25. Assistive Technology “Assistive Technology is a device or a computer-based accommodation that provides equitable access to programs and print or online resources for persons with disabilities.” • • • • • • • • • Text-to- speech software Screen Readers Talking dictionaries Reading Machines Talking Public Access Terminals Touch Screen Computers Alternative keyboards Kurzweil Products Second Life
  • 26. Tips for Assisting Specialized Client Groups • • • • • • • • Have 1-2 workstations with adjustable tables, chairs, and armrests. Replace computer mouse with trackballs Hire a staff person who knows sign language Have pencil and paper available for patrons wanting to communicate in writing Subscribe to periodicals that cater to people with “disabilities” such as Ability Magazine Create a list of local resources for people with disabilities Purchase closed-captioned DVD’s Have a list of local libraries that offer the Assistive Technology your organization doesn’t provide
  • 27. References • Ability Magazine. (2013). Retrieved from http://www.abilitymagazine.com/ • American Foundation for the Blind. (2013). Retrieved from http://www.afb.org/ • Americans with Disabilities Act. (2013). Information and technical assistance. Retrieved from http://www.ada.gov/ • Assistive Technology Products. (2013). Microsoft Assistance. Retrieved from http://www.microsoft.com/enable/at/types.aspx • Kurzweil Educational Systems. (n.d.). Kurzweil Reader. Retrieved fromhttp://www.kurzweiledu.com/default.html • University of Washington. Equal access: Universal design of libraries. Retrieved from http://www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Academics/equal_acc ess_lib.html
  • 28. Final Questions?
  • 29. BIBLIOGRAPHY Bibliography is located at the following URL: https://sites.google.com/a/sjsu.edu/presentation-site-forkristen-rebmann/home/library-2-013 Note: The bibliography won’t be available until November 3, 2013. Bibliography compiled by Dr. Kristen Rebmann, Chair SLIS Diversity Committee
  • 30. Thank you! Feel free to contact us with any questions! • Sophia Duran MLIS Student/San Jose State University/School of Library and Information Science SLIS Diversity Committee Member sophia.duran@sjsu.desire2learn.com • Arglenda Friday, JD, MLIS Lecturer and SLIS Diversity Committee Liaison arglenda.friday@gmail.com • Patty Wong, MLIS County Library/Yolo County and Instructor SJSU/SLIS patty.wong@yolocounty.org • Kristen Radsliff Rebmann, Ph.D., MLIS Associate Professor and Chair, SLIS Diversity Committee kristen.rebmann@sjsu.edu • Sharon Tani, MLIS Regional Director of Library Services Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts/Los Angeles SLIS Diversity Committee Member STani@la.chefs.edu • Beth Wrenn-Estes, MLIS Lecturer and SLIS Diversity Committee Member bwestes@me.com