Unit 6 natural disasters the great flood and katrina
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Unit 6 natural disasters the great flood and katrina Unit 6 natural disasters the great flood and katrina Document Transcript

  • Unit 6: Natural Disasters: The Great Flood & Katrina ytical Reasoning: Ethics, Values & Effective Citizenship Unit 6: Natural Disasters: The Great Flood & Katrina Natural disasters have had ruinous impacts on the lives and livelihood of people and places throughout the world. CriOque Barry’s Rising Tide. Engage in discussions about Barry’s book with at least three members of your learning community. Working collaboraOvely with three others, answer the following quesOons: What is the professional responsibility of engineers, developers and policy makers in the protecOon of human life and the environment? What are the consequences for violaOng professional ethics? What is federalism and why is that concept perOnent in the case analysis of Katrina and/or the flood of 1927? Could the levees that broke in New Orleans in the flood of 1927 and those that broke during Hurricane Katrina of 2005, have been built to higher safety and engineering standards? Write an essay with three members of your learning community in which you draw upon Barry’s work and advance stronger ethical standards and seek to reform public policy in ways that promote stronger regulaOons. Unit Descrip?on: Natural disasters and the responses to them have shaped the history of socieOes and naOons throughout
  • the world. No two tragedies have been more important to American and parOcularly African‐ American history than the Great Flood of 1927 and Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Although 80 years apart, the devastaOon and subsequent controversies surrounding the two were remarkably similar and lead to quesOons about race and racism, migraOon, and governmental responsibility in this country. Unit Narra?ve: The Great Flood of 1927 wiped out towns from Cairo, Illinois, to New Orleans, leaving nearly a thousand people dead and a million homeless. It was a natural disaster that in some ways dwarfed Hurricane Katrina, and the resources available to respond to it, parOcularly in the Mississippi Delta, were negligible at best. In the Delta, white leaders met the devastaOon and clean up efforts the only way they knew how: they forced blacks to do it. Under marOal law, white leaders in the Delta arrested black men, women, and children who tried to leave and forced them to repair the levees that had been wiped away. Issues of migraOon, race and racism, and governmental responsibility during the Great Flood compare directly with Hurricane Katrina. John Barry’s Rising Tide will help to facilitate this discussion along with the PBS Frontline program The Storm—an episode from which will be shown each day for the enOre unit. Barry’s essay “What You Need to
  • Know about Katrina” and his website with images of varying degrees of flood protecOon around the world will also provoke an examinaOon of the other inherent quesOons associated with this tract. 36 Day 1: Great Flood of 1927 This class will deal with the history of the Great Flood of 1927. It will begin with Alice Pearson’s Greenville Levee Blues to introduce students to the cultural implicaOons of the Great Flood and will use the PBS American Experience film Fatal Flood to get into the actual events surrounding the disaster. In parOcular, the Great Flood of 1927 sent many black families packing for Northern ciOes as part of the Great MigraOon. In the Spring of 1927, aher weeks of unending rains, the Mississippi River flooded its banks from Cairo, Illinois, to New Orleans, inundaOng hundreds of towns, killing as many as a thousand people, and leaving up to one million homeless. It was a natural disaster that in some ways dwarfed Katrina, and the resources available to respond to it, parOcularly in the Mississippi Delta, were negligible at best. In the Mississippi Delta, white leaders met this devastaOon and clean up efforts the only way they knew how; they forced blacks to do it. Those whites had to center a large part of their efforts on the task of keeping blacks
  • from leaving. Displaced sharecroppers sought help from families and friends across the country, and those families in turn pushed them to finally leave the South. The only problem was that large parts of the Mississippi Delta were under marshal law, and many black men, women, and children who tried to leave were arrested and then—along with blacks and poor whites already in the convict‐lease system and on chain gangs— forced to work to shore up and repair the levees all along the Delta. These issues will lead directly to a comparison with Katrina and class discussion. John Barry’s arguments in Rising Tide will help to facilitate this discussion. SOURCES Intro: Alice Pearson, Greenville Levee Blues I woke up this morning, Couldn’t even get out of my door. I woke up this morning, Couldn’t even get out of my door. The levee broke and this town is overflowed. hIp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FLGrodTtL1I Film: Fatal Flood hIp://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/flood/ Reading: John Barry, Rising Tide, excerpts (Intro) Day 2: Katrina This class will deal with the history of Katrina and begin with “Part 1: Chaos and Tragedy” of the PBS Frontline
  • program The Storm—an episode from which will be shown each day for the rest of this secOon. John Barry’s essay “What You Need to Know about Katrina” will facilitate this discussion and look at the quesOons central to this secOon, including: What is the professional responsibility of engineers, developers and policy makers in the protecOon of human life and the environment? 37 What are the consequences for violaOng professional ethics? What is federalism and why is that concept perOnent in the case analysis of Katrina and/or the flood of 1927? Could the levees that broke in New Orleans in the flood of 1927 and those that broke during Hurricane Katrina of 2005, have been built to higher safety and engineering standards? In addiOon, John Barry’s website and the images of varying degrees of flood protecOon around the world should be used to bring these points to bear. SOURCES Film: The Storm Part 1: Chaos and Tragedy hIp://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/storm/view/ Reading: John Barry, “What You Need to Know About Katrina—and SOll Don’t—Why It
  • Makes Economic Sense to Protect New Orleans” hIp://www.johnmbarry.com/bio.htm Music Video: Lil Wayne, Tie My Hands Hurricane Katrina Day 3 Educa?onal Implica?ons for Displaced Students aaer Hurricane Katrina This presentaOon will include an engaging analysis on youth affected by the storm and its impact on their academic performance. Students displaced by the hurricane faced mulOple challenges in adjusOng to new school sesngs along with unstructured support from the assigned district. According to data reported by the Southern EducaOon FoundaOon (SEF, 2007) between 20,000 and 30,000 students did not aIend school at all in the 2005‐2006 school term. This rise in student populaOons across 49 states proved that many schools were woefully unprepared in space and resources to accommodate this student populaOon surge. This presentaOon will cover the mental well‐being of students using video and mulO‐media. Given the average classroom will not hold posiOve student‐teacher raOos, schools had issues of overcrowding and limited supplies. In those limited resources, supplemental services were also needed for students who required remedial assistance in academic preparaOon. Students in this module will be required to offer analysis of post Katrina challenges to student
  • performance in educaOon and compare other underserved districts with similar issues in student performance. Recommended Reading: EducaOon aher Katrina: Time for a New Federal Response. (8/30/2007) Southern EducaOon FoundaOon (SEF) Film: The Storm Part 2: FEMA’s Rocky History hIp://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/storm/view/ 38 Children of the Storm, Hurricane Katrina hIp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=‐ QG03FQOZ3k&feature=related Children of the Storm, Hurricane Katrina, Children Survivors hIp://www.youtube.com/watch? v=95SNlMwxIvk&feature=related Katrina's Effect on Kids: What Have We Learned? hIp://www.youtube.com/watch? v=FciRuwtgf9c&feature=related Alarming Post‐Katrina Study hIp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YCbIGa86oGQ Day 4 Implica?ons for Health and Wellness among Displaced Youth: A Global Perspec?ve This presentaOon will conOnue with the focus on Hurricane Katrina and its impact on children and adolescent
  • populaOon in terms of social and emoOonal well‐being. Several studies and endless documents cite the lasOng impact of trauma causing serious mental illness and behavioral problems of children who witness natural disasters on this scale. A significant perspecOve from this presentaOon will allow the student to examine the long term effect of natural disasters on children and their families, while comparing similar events on a global scale. The facilitator will provide media resources from major catastrophes from around the world (e.g. China, HaiO, etc.) and make comparaOve links to that of Hurricane Katrina and the Flood of 1927. In consideraOon of the knowledge gained from the introductory porOon of this module, students will idenOfy common outcomes and challenges faced by children and families aher a natural disaster occurs. AddiOonally, the students will evaluate intervenOons made by government, local agencies and internaOonal groups to meet those needs. Film: The Storm Part 3: FEMA aher 9/11 hIp://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/storm/view/ HaiO Earthquake: Concern over SituaOon of children in Port‐au‐Prince hIp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OdfHZZeCHPA Katrina's Effect on Kids: What Have We Learned? hIp://www.youtube.com/watch?
  • v=FciRuwtgf9c&feature=related PTSD: Mental Health in the Wake of Disaster hIp://www.youtube.com/watch? v=KJg3DcHRIGM&feature=related UNICEF: Earthquakes toll on Schools in Qinghai, Province China hIp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GsaRjuimp4k 39 Day 5 Students should be given a brief lecture on PoliOcs (definiOons) and be introduced to the concept of federalism. What is Federalism? • Federalism is a way of organizing a naOon so that two or more levels of government have formal authority over the same area and people. Establishing NaOonal Supremacy • This is Very important because it suggests that the United States Government should have taken more control to ensure that New Orleans was protected. McCulloch v. Maryland ‐ (1819) –The Supreme Court ruled that naOonal policies take precedence over state policies: Chief JusOce John Marshall wrote that “the government of the United States, though limited in its power, is supreme within its sphere of acOon.” From dual to cooperaOve federalism • What is dual federalism?
  • Also called “layer cake federalism” – a form of federalism in which states and the na‐ Oonal government each remain supreme within their own spheres. • What is cooperaOve federalism? Also called “marble cake federalism” – a form of federalism with mingled responsibiliOes and blurred disOncOons between the levels of government. Film: The Storm Part 4: The CommunicaOons Breakdown in Katrina hIp://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/storm/view/ Day 6 Film: The Storm Part 5: Epilogue hIp://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/storm/view/ Presenta?ons: Day 7 and Day 8 Each group will be asked to read the ?meline of the events leading up to Katrina, and the days following Katrina. They will then be asked to make an assessment of their appointed ?meline. Group One (July 23, 2005 – August 28, 2005) Read the summaries of the arOcles that cover your Ome period at the website hIp://www.factcheck.org/arOcle348.html. As a group, decide what criOcism might be made of the ac‐ Oons of the following people:
  • • New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin • President George W. Bush Conduct research on Hurricane Pam and answer the following quesOons. 40 • Who parOcipated in Hurricane Pam? • What was the purpose of this exercise? • What major issues or problems were idenOfied? • What impact did officials think this hurricane would have on New Orleans? • What was done with the informaOon that was learned from Hurricane Pam? Using informaOon from your reading, take a stand on whom you would blame for the poor response to Hurricane Katrina. Explain your answer and provide supporOng informaOon. Using supporOng informaOon, organize a short presentaOon that covers your group's findings on who is to blame for the devastaOon. Include a recommendaOon on how this problem could be avoided in the future. Summarize what you will be presenOng here. Group Two (August 29, 2005 – August 31, 2005) Read the summaries of the arOcles that cover your Ome period at the website, hIp://www.factcheck.org/arOcle348.html. As a group, decide what criOcism might be made of the ac‐ Oons of the following people: • President George W. Bush
  • • Secretary of Homeland Security Michael Chertoff • United States Senator David ViIer • Louisiana Governor Kathleen Blanco Research the breach of the 17th Street Canal: • What was FEMA's response to the breach of the 17th Street Canal? • Why did the flooding conOnue aher Hurricane Katrina leh the city? • What evidence is there that communicaOons broke down between various levels of government and agencies during the flooding? Using informaOon from your reading, take a stand on whom you would blame for the poor response to Hurricane Katrina. Explain your answer and provide supporOng informaOon. Using supporOng informaOon, organize a short presentaOon that covers your group's findings on who is to blame for the devastaOon. Include a recommendaOon on how this problem could be avoided in the future. Summarize what you will be presenOng here. Read the summaries of the arOcles that cover your Ome period, at the website hIp://www.factcheck.org/arOcle348.html. As a group, decide what criOcism might be made of the ac‐ Oons of the following people: • President George W. Bush • FEMA director Michael Brown • New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin
  • What problems did the following people report: • CNN Correspondent Adaora Udoji • Dr. Sanjay Gupta • CNN Correspondent Paula Zahn • New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin • Red Cross Officials 41 Group Three (September 1, 2005 – September 2, 2005) Read the transcript at the website hIp://www.factcheck.org/arOcle348.html As a group, answer the following quesOons: • What were Mayor Ray Nagin's criOcisms of President George W. Bush? • Why does Mayor Ray Nagin blame the governor, FEMA and Homeland Security for the 17th Street Canal breach? Using informaOon from your reading, take a stand on whom you would blame for the poor response to Hurricane Katrina. Explain your answer and provide supporOng informaOon. Using supporOng informaOon, organize a short presentaOon that covers your group's findings on who is to blame for the devastaOon. Include a recommendaOon on how this problem could be avoided in the future. Summarize what you will be presenOng here. Group Four (September 3, 2005 – September 15, 2005) Read the summaries of the arOcles that cover your Ome
  • period, at the website hIp://www.factcheck.org/arOcle348.html. As a group, answer the following quesOons: • What issues came up as the dead were removed from the streets of New Orleans? • What responsibility does the federal government have for the failures in New Orleans according to President George W. Bush? • What does FEMA director Michael Brown say about the acOons of the Louisiana Governor Kathleen Blanco? Using informaOon from your reading, take a stand on whom you would blame for the poor response to Hurricane Katrina. Explain your answer and provide supporOng informaOon. Using supporOng informaOon, organize a short presentaOon that covers your group's findings on who is to blame for the devastaOon. Include a recommendaOon on how this problem could be avoided in the future. Summarize what you will be presenOng here. 42