Spartan Pp
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Spartan Pp

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Spartan Pp Spartan Pp Presentation Transcript

  • The Battle of Thermopylae Comparing the Two Armies Done by: Bader Warrayat
  • What Really Happened
    • Everything that was seen in the movie had actually happened. Although it was blown out of proportion in the movie.
    • There were only 300 Spartans but only about 300,000 Persians.
  • Greeks Fight the Immortals
    • On the third day, Leonidas led his 300 Spartan hoplites which means an elite troops selected because they had living sons back home plus the allied Thespians and Thebans against Xerxes and his army with "10,000 Immortals ." The Spartan-led forces fought this unstoppable Persian force to their deaths in order to block the pass long enough to keep Xerxes and his army occupied while the rest of the Greek army escaped.
  • Aftermath
    • Persians attacked the Greek fleet at Artemisium, with both sides suffering heavy losses. In September of 480, aided by northern Greeks, the Persians marched on Athens and burned it to the ground, but it had been evacuated.
    • So in the end… Persia did prevail.
  • Comparing the Armies Spartans
    • The Spartans start their warrior carriers the second they are born. The newly born
    • babies are examined to see if they have any defaults or are weak. If they are then they
    • will be discarded. If they are chosen then they will begin on along road to become a
    • Spartan warrior. The Spartans don’t fight in numbers but they use their heads. They plan
    • and strategize different tactics to overcome there enemy.
  • Formations
    • They use formations like
    • “ tortoise formation” which is when they lift up their shields to make a protective barrier
    • that doesn’t allow any projectile, like an arrow, to get past their defenses. The Spartans
    • use hard training and good tactics to win their battles and earn the name as the strongest
    • army in the Mediterranean and the world.
  • Persian Army
    • The Persian army on the other hand has a very different but just as effective
    • method. They conquer nearby countries and colonies then oblige the men to be warriors
    • and force the women and children to be slaves. The sheer mass of the Persian army is
    • enough to scare anyone into submission.
  • Tactics
    • The tactic that they most commonly use are scaring their enemies into submission or overwhelming them with there numbers. But, if
    • this doesn’t work they have a more effective way of defeating their enemies.
    • They use a special smaller division called “The Immortals”. They are the most elite
    • fighters in all of Asia.
  • Similarities
    • Although they have different tactics and ways of choosing the armies, they both
    • do have one thing that is in common with both armies and that is the leaders. Both the
    • leader of the Spartan army is king Unitious and the leader of the Persian army is Xercsies.
    • Both of these great rulers have a vision of a great world but Xercsies has one big flaw and
    • that is he wants too much which leads him to conquer more than he can handle.
  • In Conclusion
    • Both of these great armies have many tactics like sheer number or highly trained
    • troops. Both armies have different ways of choosing and training each of their troops.
    • Some are slaves and some are chosen from birth. But they both have one thing in
    • common and that’s the leaders. The Persian leader has some flaws but who doesn’t.
  • Work Cited
    • http://ancienthistory.about.com/cs/weaponswar/p/blpwtherm.htm , Tomas Johnson 2004