Using published sources<br />Quotations<br />
Quotations<br />Types of quotations:<br />Direct = one in which you record precisely the language of someone else.<br />In...
Direct / Indirect examples<br />Direct quotation:<br />  Franklin D. Roosevelt said, “The only thing we have to fear is fe...
Direct and Indirect Quotations<br />For both direct and indirect quotations you must credit your sources!<br />
When to quote?<br />Use quotations when another writer’s language is particularly memorable and will add interest and live...
Notes on Quotes<br />When you quote too much, you risk losing ownership of your work.  More easily than you think, your vo...
Notes on Quotes<br />Don’t over quote. It is your paper. The majority of the paper comes from your ideas. <br />Balance qu...
Notes on Quotes<br />Quote only the part of a sentence of paragraph that you need and work the material into your paper in...
Notes on Quotes	<br />Connect the quote with your paper. Use a transition phrase, transition word, etc. <br />E.g. Histori...
Notes on Quotes<br />Whenever you quote a sentence but delete words from it, indicate this deletion to the reader with thr...
Notes on Quotes<br />Use brackets to add or substitute words in a quoted sentence.<br />Original: “After the fire they did...
Using Published Sources<br />When to summarize, paraphrase and quote?<br />Summarize:<br />To present main points of a len...
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Using Quotations(Jill T )

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Using Quotations(Jill T )

  1. 1. Using published sources<br />Quotations<br />
  2. 2. Quotations<br />Types of quotations:<br />Direct = one in which you record precisely the language of someone else.<br />Indirect = one in which you report what someone has said without repeating the words exactly as spoken (or written).<br />
  3. 3. Direct / Indirect examples<br />Direct quotation:<br /> Franklin D. Roosevelt said, “The only thing we have to fear is fear itself.”<br />Indirect quotation:<br />Franklin D. Roosevelt said that we have nothing to fear but fear itself.<br />
  4. 4. Direct and Indirect Quotations<br />For both direct and indirect quotations you must credit your sources!<br />
  5. 5. When to quote?<br />Use quotations when another writer’s language is particularly memorable and will add interest and liveliness to your paper.<br />Use quotations when another writer’s language is so clear and economical that to make the same point in your own words would, by comparison, be ineffective.<br />Use quotations when you want the solid reputation of a source to lend authority and credibility to your own writing.<br />
  6. 6. Notes on Quotes<br />When you quote too much, you risk losing ownership of your work. More easily than you think, your voice can be drowned out by the voices of those you’ve quoted. <br />Use quotation sparingly, as you would a pungent spice.<br />
  7. 7. Notes on Quotes<br />Don’t over quote. It is your paper. The majority of the paper comes from your ideas. <br />Balance quotations with paraphrases and summaries. <br />
  8. 8. Notes on Quotes<br />Quote only the part of a sentence of paragraph that you need and work the material into your paper in a natural and fluid manner.<br />Avoid freestanding quotations – even when properly cited, they can be jarring to a reader.<br />
  9. 9. Notes on Quotes <br />Connect the quote with your paper. Use a transition phrase, transition word, etc. <br />E.g. Historian John Doe has argued that in 1941 "almost all Americans assumed the war would end quickly" (Doe 223). (http://www.unc.edu/depts/wcweb/handouts/quotations.html)<br />
  10. 10. Notes on Quotes<br />Whenever you quote a sentence but delete words from it, indicate this deletion to the reader with three spaced periods – called ellipsis – in the sentence at the point of deletion.<br />Make sure, if you delete part of a quote, that you don’t change the author’s meaning!<br />Original: “To read well, that is to read true books in a true spirit, is a noble exercise, and one that will task the reader more than any exercise which the customs of the day esteem.” – Henry David Thoreau, Walden<br />With ellipsis: Henry David Thoreau writes, “To read well . . . is a noble exercise, and one that will task the reader more than any exercise which the customs of the day esteem.”<br />
  11. 11. Notes on Quotes<br />Use brackets to add or substitute words in a quoted sentence.<br />Original: “After the fire they did not return to the station house for three hours.” (unclear, in this quote, who “they” refers to)<br />With brackets: An official from City Hall said, “After the fire [the officers] did not return to the station house for three hours.”<br />(note that our quote now has a source, and the added words do not change the meaning of the original quote but only make it more clear)<br />
  12. 12. Using Published Sources<br />When to summarize, paraphrase and quote?<br />Summarize:<br />To present main points of a lengthy passage<br />To condense non-main points necessary to discussion<br />Paraphrase:<br />To clarify a short passage<br />To emphasize main points<br />Quote:<br />To capture another writer’s particularly memorable language<br />To capture another writer’s clearly and economically stated language<br />To lend authority and credibility to your own writing<br />

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