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PGCTHE handbook 2008 - 2009
 

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    PGCTHE handbook 2008 - 2009 PGCTHE handbook 2008 - 2009 Document Transcript

    • Postgraduate Certificate in Teaching in Higher Education (PGCTHE)<br />Programme Handbook<br />2009-2010<br />Contents<br />Section 1: Introducing the Programme<br />1.1Introduction<br />1.2Structure<br />1.3Teaching at AU<br />1.4Programme Team<br />1.5Departmental Mentors<br />1.6Booking and Registration<br />1.7English and Welsh<br />1.8Further Information<br />Section 2: Programme Content<br />2.1Programme Aims<br />2.2Outcomes for the Programme<br />2.3Higher Education Academy<br />2.4Course Programme<br />2.4.1 Pre-course Briefing<br />2.4.2 Residential Induction<br />2.4.3 Three Teaching Cycles<br />2.4.3.1Support<br />2.4.3.2 Presentation<br />2.4.4 CPD Reports<br />2.4.5 Departmental Mentor Meetings<br />2.4.5.1The Mentor Scheme<br />2.4.5.2Mentors & Assessment<br />2.4.5.3Changing Mentors<br />2.4.6 Teaching Observations<br />2.4.7 Individual and Group Meetings<br />2.5Study Calendar<br />2.6Introductory Resources<br />2.6.1 Websites<br />2.6.2 Booklist<br />2.6.3Journals Available Online<br />2.6.4Vodcast and Podcast Resources<br />Section 3: Assessment<br />3.1 The Portfolio<br />3.1.1The Portfolio Matrix Index<br />3.1.2The Induction Assignments<br />3.1.3Three Teaching Cycle Reports<br />3.1.4First Teaching Cycle Presentation<br />3.1.5CPD Workshop Reports<br />3.1.6Teaching Observation Reports<br />3.1.7Personal Commentary<br />3.1.8References and Sources<br />3.2 Portfolio Assessment Criteria<br />3.3 Submission of Portfolio<br />3.4 Assessment Panel<br />3.5 Referrals and Fails<br />3.6PGCTHE Board of Studies<br />3.7Exit Points<br />3.8Leaving Aberystwyth<br />Section 4: Information for Mentors<br />4.1Mentors<br />4.2 Mentor Training and Programme Briefing<br />4.3Mentor Responsibilities<br />4.3.1 Induction<br />4.3.2 Mentor Meetings<br />4.3.3Teaching Observations<br />4.3.4 PGCTHE Presentations<br />4.3.5 Submission of Portfolio<br />4.3.6 Assessment of Portfolios<br />Appendix 1:Information on Languages<br />Appendix 2:Indicative Content for Mentor Meetings<br />Appendix 3:Forms<br />Milestones<br />Meeting with Mentor<br />Teaching Cycle Agreement<br />Teaching Observation Form<br />Intention to Submit Form<br />Appendix 4:Glossary of Terms<br />Appendix 5:PGCTHE Dates 2009/2010<br />Induction<br />Group 20:<br />1st Teaching Cycle Presentations<br />Intention to Submit Form Dates<br />Portfolio Submission Dates<br />PGCTHE Assessment PanelPGCTHE Presentations (Pre 2006)<br />PGCTHE Consultative Forum<br />PGCTHE Board of Studies<br />Appendix 6:Programme of CPD sessions<br />Appendix 7:Residential Induction Programme<br />Section 1: Introducing the Programme<br />1.1 Introduction<br />Welcome to the Postgraduate Certificate in Teaching in Higher Education (PGCTHE) at Aberystwyth University. The PGCTHE is designed for staff who teach and support learning in Higher Education across a wide variety of contexts, from lecturing and distance learning to adult education. The programme is accredited by the Higher Education Academy, the central UK institution charged with enhancing the quality of teaching and learning in Higher Education. Successful completion of the programme leads to a Master’s level qualification in the form of a Postgraduate Certificate, as well as registration with the Higher Education Academy as a Fellow (FHEA). The programme consists of one 60 credit Master’s level module (EDM1060), and normally takes between 12 months and 3 years to complete.<br />This programme handbook describes out the aims, structure and assessment process for the programme. We would suggest you read Section 1 to gain a brief overview of how the programme works. Section 2 provides more detail of the content of the programme, offering a point of reference and a means of planning your work in order to achieve the qualification. Section 3 outlines the assessment procedures. Section 4 provides additional information for mentors.<br />1.2 Structure<br />The programme involves both a taught element and independent work where you use your current work context as a basis for developing a variety of teaching methods and considering the relevant literature. The work-based nature of the programme means that many of the learning activities take place during your usual teaching. The programme includes:<br />A pre-course briefing<br />A residential induction programme<br />Three ‘teaching cycles’ – small-scale research projects on student learning<br />Continuing Professional Development (CPD) workshops<br />Meetings with a departmental mentor experienced in teaching your discipline<br />Teaching observations<br />Regular individual or group meetings providing support from the programme team.<br />The programme is assessed by means of an end-of-course portfolio in which you present evidence of the development of your professional skills and knowledge of teaching in your departmental context. This evidence is drawn from normal teaching duties and continuing professional development activities. The portfolio is assessed by a panel of senior staff according to criteria conforming to the requirements for Higher Education Academy accreditation.<br />1.3 Teaching at AU<br />The PGCTHE is designed to provide an appropriate entry route to Higher Education teaching for staff. In developing lecturers’ educational knowledge and skills, the programme contributes towards AU’s Learning and Teaching Strategy, which states that “AU aims to provide a high quality learning environment which involves students at all levels in an active and transforming learning experience. We seek to foster a culture of reflection and innovation to enhance the quality and value of that experience”. Successful completion of the programme is normally a formal requirement for newly appointed academic staff with less than three years teaching experience, although other academic staff may elect to follow the programme when there is sufficient capacity.<br />1.4 Programme Team<br />The PGCTHE is coordinated from the School of Education and Lifelong Learning (SELL). The programme is currently based in G19 Cledwyn Building (Penglais Campus). The Learning and Teaching Development Coordinator for Aberystwyth University is the primary contact for the course (oam@aber.ac.uk 01970 628523). Administrative assistance is provided by the Centre for the Development of Staff and Academic Practice (staff.dev@aber.ac.uk 01970 622386). <br />The programme is run in partnership with Bangor University, Trinity St. Davids, Swansea University and the University of Wales Institute Cardiff. The residential induction is run jointly, providing participants with the opportunity to further their knowledge of teaching through contact with colleagues throughout Wales. Programme partners also collaborate in the assessment process and are represented on the Exam Board.<br />1.5 Departmental Mentors<br />Each participant is assigned an individual mentor by the head of department. Mentors are established and experienced staff who will support the participant throughout the programme. Mentors also undertake teaching observations of the participant and will participate in the assessment of portfolios.<br />1.6 Booking and Registration<br />The PGCTHE is open to all staff teaching at any level, both full time and part time. However participants must undertake a minimum of 90 hours teaching over the course of the programme (maximum 3 years). Formal registration for the programme takes place at the induction, but to request and book a place on the programme please contact the Centre for the Development of Staff and Academic Practice.<br />Once a place has been allocated, participants should return the Confirmation Form at least four weeks before the date for the Residential Induction (see link for dates).<br /> http://www.aber.ac.uk/staffdevelopment/english/tHEscheme.htm <br />1.7 English and Welsh<br />The PGCTHE is committed to the Aberystwyth University’s Welsh Language Scheme. The programme is delivered through the media of English and Welsh as appropriate. In common with all AU courses, assessed work may be submitted in either English or Welsh. The Welsh medium version of the course is supported by the Centre for Welsh Medium Higher Education. Please see Appendix 1 for further information.<br />1.8 Further Information<br />Further details of dates, as well as pro-formas and additional information can be found on the PGCTHE website: <br />http://www.aber.ac.uk/staffdevelopment/english/tHEscheme.htm<br />Section 2:Programme Content<br />2.1 Programme Aims<br />The programme encourages you to develop yourself as an educator, using your current work context as a basis for practising a variety of methods and informing your practices with a consideration of the literature on teaching in HE. The work of teaching not only includes performing as a lecturer or tutor, but also planning and running sessions, designing support for students, supervising practical work, marking assessments and giving feedback, taking part in the departmental administration of teaching and experimenting with new ways of encouraging students to engage with your discipline. All of this work takes place in a rapidly changing context in which not only the student population but their technological and social environment is undergoing transformation. The programme assists educators in reflecting on and evaluating the purpose and methods of teaching in diverse environments. It also provides a starting point for the continuing development of professional skills throughout a career in Higher Education. It is important to emphasise that the successful completion of the programme involves demonstrating not only that you can teach, but that you have also thought critically about what it means to teach well and are continuing to develop and learn.<br />Learning Outcomes<br />On completion of the programme, you will have developed your professional ability to:<br />Design and plan effective learning opportunities, resources and/or programmes of study.<br />Select and perform a range of teaching methods to support learning.<br />Design and implement effective assessment schemes, and provide feedback to learners.<br />Develop environments for learning that offer effective student support and guidance.<br />Integrate scholarly, research based knowledge of learning with the practices of teaching and supporting learning.<br />Evaluate the impact of teaching using a range of monitoring methods, and use to plan the development of professional practices<br />2.2 Outcomes for the Programme<br />As a Master’s level programme, the expectation is of a standard of study commensurate with Aberystwyth University Level-M Standard Descriptor in which you must: “display mastery of a complex and specialized area of knowledge and skills, employing advanced skills to conduct research, or advanced technical and professional activity....”<br />Assessment for the programme is based on the participant’s ability to evidence the achievement of the Learning Outcomes above. The Assessment Criteria outlines in further detail how participants can show that they have met these Learning Outcomes (see Section 3.2). In brief, as a Master’s Level programme, participants will be asked to evidence, for each Learning Outcome:<br /> Knowledge and Understanding of key issues in each particular area, partly through an engagement with the professional literature on learning and teaching, i.e. <br />Intellectual Skills through the critical assessment, analysis and evaluation of ideas and practices.<br />Professional Practical Skills applied in your own particular teaching context.<br />2.3 Higher Education Academy<br />The PGCTHE is benchmarked against the UK Professional Standards Framework for teaching and supporting learning in higher education at Standard Descriptor 2.<br />2.3.1UK Professional Standards Framework<br />The UK Professional Standards Framework (UK PSF) for teaching and supporting learning is a flexible framework which uses a descriptor-based approach to professional standards.<br />The standards framework aims to act as:<br />an enabling mechanism to support the professional development of staff engaged in supporting learning;<br />a means by which professional approaches to supporting student learning can be fostered through creativity, innovation and continuous development;<br />a means of demonstrating to students and other stakeholders the professionalism that staff bring to the support of the student learning experience, and;<br />a means to support consistency and quality of the student learning experience.<br />The PGCTHE is aligned against Standard Descriptor 2 which states that participants should:<br />“Demonstrate an understanding of the student learning experience through engagement with all areas of activity, core knowledge and professional values; the ability to engage in practices related to all areas of activity; the ability to incorporate research, scholarship and/or professional practice into those activities.”<br />The PGCTHE impacts on all of the Areas of Activity (AA) outlined in the UK PSF. The areas of activity are:<br />
      • Design and planning of learning activities and/or programmes of study
      • Teaching and/or supporting student learning
      • Assessment and giving feedback to learners
      • Developing effective environments and student support and guidance
      • Integration of scholarship, research and professional activities with teaching and supporting learning
      • Evaluation of practice and continuing professional development
      In addition, through engagement with the PGCTHE participants will develop knowledge and understanding of the UK PSF Core Knowledge (CK) which relates to:<br />
      • The subject material
      • Appropriate methods for teaching and learning in the subject area and at the level of the academic programme
      • How students learn, both generally and in the subject
      • The use of appropriate learning technologies
      • Methods for evaluating the effectiveness of teaching
      • The implications of quality assurance and enhancement for professional practice
      As well as actively committing themselves to the UK PSF Professional Values (PV) which are:<br />
      • Respect for individual learners
      • Commitment to incorporating the process and outcomes of relevant research, scholarship and/or professional practice
      • Commitment to development of learning communities
      • Commitment to encouraging participation in higher education, acknowledging diversity and promoting equality of opportunity
      • Commitment to continuing professional development and evaluation of practice
      More information on the UK PSF can be found at:<br />http://www.heacademy.ac.uk/ourwork/policy/framework <br />2.4 Course Programme<br />The programme consists of:<br />A pre-course briefing<br />A residential induction programme.<br />Three ‘teaching cycles’ (including a presentation event for first cycle).<br />Continuing Professional Development (CPD) workshops.<br />Departmental mentor meetings.<br />Teaching observations.<br />Regular individual or group meetings providing support from the programme team.<br />2.4.1 Pre-Course Briefing<br />All participants attend a pre-course briefing lasting no more than 2 hours which is normally held during the week before the induction (please see http://www.aber.ac.uk/staffdevelopment/english/tHEscheme.htm for dates and venues). The briefing provides background information on the programme and the induction, and gives participants the opportunity to meet other members of their group.<br />2.4.2 Residential Induction & Third Day<br />The residential induction is a joint venture with Aberystwyth’s collaborators. The first two days’ residential programme allow staff to make contact with new colleagues in a pleasant physical environment and aims to stimulate engagement with topics and issues in teaching and learning in HE. The third day is based back in Aberystwyth, and focuses on next steps for participants joining the course. <br />Practicalities<br />Accommodation is at Plas Tan y Bwlch, a residential training centre near Maentwrog, Gwynedd (www.plastanybwlch.com). Transport is provided from the Porter’s Lodge, Penglais Campus, usually leaving at 8:45am on Day 1 and returning to Aberystwyth by 5:00pm on Day 2. <br />Please see http://www.aber.ac.uk/staffdevelopment/english/tHEscheme.htm for more details of dates and arrangements. Once you have been allocated a place on an induction (see 1.6 Registration and Booking above), please return the Confirmation Form (available for download from the same webpage), including any special dietary requirements, whether you will be using the transport provided, and your preferred language (Welsh, English or bilingual) for group work (see Appendix 1 for further information on language).<br />Residential Induction Programme <br />Details of the residential induction programme will be circulated separately in advance of the induction. Preparation for the induction normally includes: <br />(1) A short statement on “Learning and Studying at University”.<br />Participants write a short statement (one page) on the topic of ‘Learning and Studying at University’. The aim of the statement is to provide an introduction to your thinking on education for the purposes of a small group discussion that will help participants to refine their ideas about teaching and learning. The statement is intended to represent your perceptions based in your own experience, in particular of your subject area and so does not have to be a heavily referenced document.<br />You will need to bring 5 copies of this statement with you – one for the tutors, three for other PGCTHE participants to review your statement and one for yourself. Please note that participants will be allocated to a group depending on their language preference (see Appendix 1 for further information on language). Any thoughts you develop as a result of the exercise should be recorded and included along with the statement in your final portfolio.<br />(2) Pre-induction Reading <br />To make the most of discussion based activities at the induction you will need to read four short introductory papers on teaching and learning. The papers set out some of the key concepts that provide a basis for discussion about effective teaching practices. At various points during the induction we will refer to these ideas. Papers will be circulated in advance of the induction.<br />(3) Teaching Session<br />During the induction each participant will deliver a 10 minute excerpt from one of their teaching sessions These presentations will take place to small groups of fellow participants on the first afternoon. <br />The presentations form the basis for a discussion about teaching observations and the development of teaching skills over the course of the qualification. Feedback will be given at the end of each presentation. You will be given the opportunity to decide, as a group, what you would like to receive feedback about and will be asked to complete observation forms for each of the presentations you see. This feedback should be recorded and included with a personal commentary in your final PGCTHE portfolio.<br />A data projector, laptop, flipcharts and OHP will all be available and it is up to the individual as to what resources they chose to use – it is perfectly acceptable to stand and talk without visual aids or to bring a pre-prepared PowerPoint presentation.<br />Participants who plan to present through the medium of Welsh are asked to advise the programme team (via the Induction Confirmation Form) so the arrangements can be made for simultaneous translation (see Appendix 1 for further information on language).<br />2.4.3 Three Teaching Cycles<br />Most of the learning on the PGCTHE is work-based. The participant’s normal teaching duties provide the context for three ‘teaching cycles’ that are used as evidence in the portfolio.<br />A teaching cycle is a mini-research project investigating the impact of a particular teaching practice on the student experience of learning. It is known as a teaching cycle as it involves the following stages of action:<br />Identify an issue to be researched.<br />Engage with scholarship on issue.<br />Plan teaching practice and intended outcomes.<br />Undertake the teaching practice.<br />Gain feedback on the student learning experience.<br />Use interim modifications to the teaching practice if necessary.<br />Evaluate the student learning experience.<br />Plan future developments in teaching practice.<br />Please note that the term ‘teaching cycle’ should not be confused with the academic year cycle – a teaching cycle can take place over a relatively short period of time e.g. four weeks.<br />The teaching cycle is widely used in education as a means of planning and reviewing teaching and learning activities with a view to developing professional practice. It enables educators to identify expected outcomes, plan teaching activities, gain feedback from students, and evaluate the impact of their teaching. <br />For the purposes of the PGCTHE, the three teaching cycle are the most important evidence of the participant’s developing knowledge and skills of teaching and learning in their particular context, as well as their ability to evaluate practice and develop professionally. Choosing appropriate areas of focus for the teaching cycles is therefore crucial to producing a successful portfolio. Participants are advised to consider how their choice of topics across the three teaching cycles will enable them to provide concrete evidence of their attainment of the learning outcomes.<br />Each teaching cycle should be written in the form of a report with supporting evidence included. The usual structure for the report is:<br />An account of the issue including reference to appropriate literature on teaching and learning in HE.<br />A plan highlighting proposed teaching practice, intended outcomes and methods of evaluation.<br />Progress notes on teaching practice and any interim modifications.<br />Summary of relevant data and feedback on student learning.<br />Evaluation of student learning experience in relation to intended outcomes.<br />Comments on implications for professional development of teaching practice.<br />2.4.3.1Support for Teaching Cycles<br />Participants will develop their understanding of teaching cycles during the residential induction, the continuing professional development programme, group support sessions, mentor meetings and other meetings with the programme team.<br />2.4.3.2Teaching Cycle Presentation<br />Each participant will also attend a presentation event following their first teaching cycle, normally at the end of their second semester of registration. The presentation event provides participants with the opportunity to receive feedback from their peers, the programme team, mentors, AU staff, assessors and examiners. Each participant makes a 10 minute presentation on their first teaching cycle, which will normally include the elements listed above. Time will be allocated for questions and feedback. The feedback will enable participants to evaluate their own teaching cycle and develop their future teaching practice. Feedback from the presentation event can also be included in the portfolio. Further details of dates and venues can be found at http://www.aber.ac.uk/staffdevelopment/english/tHEscheme.htm.<br />2.4.4 Continuing Professional Development Workshops<br />Programme participants attend a Continuing Professional Development (CPD) programme equivalent to six full days through the course of the qualification. This normally involves attending the equivalent of two days per semester for the first three semester of registration. For more information on dates, please see http://www.aber.ac.uk/staffdevelopment/english/tHEscheme.htm.<br />The CPD programme consists of a series of workshops designed to address the key requirements of the Higher Education Academy’s Professional Standards Framework. The workshops offer the opportunity to engage with current scholarship and practice in Higher Education in order to inform participants’ approaches to student learning in their own specific context. Knowledge gained from the workshops provides a useful basis for planning and evaluating the teaching cycles.<br />The CPD programme is assessed through a short summary (one to two pages) of the workshop and its implications for the participant’s teaching, which is submitted in the end-of-course portfolio (see Section 3 below). <br />The CPD workshops are delivered by the programme team and external trainers and normally include:<br />Lecturing performance and presentation.<br />Developing student participation.<br />Designing and planning teaching programmes.<br />Using assessment and feedback to facilitate learning.<br />Effective support for students.<br />Linking teaching and research<br />The CPD programme, organised by the Centre for the Development of Staff and Academic Practice contains other sessions of interest to PGCTHE participants (e.g. Research Supervision, E-Learning, Effective Mentoring). External CPD events are often available in particular disciplines (see the Higher Education Academy website for details of your Subject Network).<br />Participants who have difficulty in attending CPD sessions should contact the programme team. Exemptions from CPD sessions may be available for participants who have previously undertaken equivalent professional development training. Exempted sessions must be replaced by equivalent sessions from the Centre for the Development of Staff and Academic Practice CPD programme or external sessions. Please contact the programme co-ordinator to discuss exemption.<br />2.4.5 Departmental Mentor Meetings<br />2.4.5.1The Mentor Scheme<br />Participants are assigned a mentor by their head of department. A mentor is usually a senior member of staff who is responsible for mentoring not only their teaching but all areas of work (see Academic Handbook for more details on AU’s mentoring scheme). Mentors should be assigned on or soon after appointment and staff should consult their Head of Department to confirm arrangements. Mentors and participants usually arrange mentor meetings three times a semester.<br />For the purposes of the PGCTHE, the mentor acts as a ‘critical friend’ who provides a source of support and discussion for the work involved in the PGCTHE. The mentor will have experience of teaching in the participant’s discipline. He or she will also be aware of the departmental context and will be able to give advice on issues such as the preparation of a new module or undertaking a particular administrative role. The content of mentor meetings is determined by the participant. Discussion of plans for implementing and evaluating the teaching cycles is particularly important and the mentor should attend your presentation of the first teaching cycle (see “Support for Teaching Cycles” under 2.4.3. above). Mentor meetings are also a valuable place for discussions of scholarship and practice in teaching in your particular discipline and provide a means of furthering your knowledge in relation to the Higher Education Academy’s Areas of Activity (see 2.3 above). Further advice on the content of mentor meetings is included in section 4.2.2. Mentors and participants are required to make a record of meetings and intended actions to ensure discussions have continuity and direction. A pro-forma to support this is available from http://www.aber.ac.uk/staffdevelopment/english/tHEscheme.htm. <br />2.4.5.2Mentors and Assessment<br />The mentor also plays a role in the assessment process. Mentors are required to read the participant’s portfolio prior to submission to recommend the portfolio for submission and to indicate that the participant has addressed all learning outcomes. They may wish to give additional information to aid in the assessment of the portfolio. Mentors across the University are asked to take part in portfolio assessment panels from time to time and your mentor may well have experience of the assessment process.<br />2.4.5.3Changing Mentors<br />Participants occasionally have a change of mentor during the course of the programme, usually because of their mentor’s work circumstances (e.g. study leave), and occasionally because of difficulties in the relationship. Please note that as the mentor scheme is administered by departments, all arrangements for a new mentor should be requested through the Head of Department. The programme team should be notified of any change so that arrangements can be made for mentor briefing and training where appropriate.<br />Further information for mentors is provided in Section 4.<br />2.4.6Teaching Observations<br />Participants take part in a minimum of seven teaching observations:<br />Two observations of the participant’s teaching by the mentor.<br />One observation of the participant’s teaching by a member of the programme team (CDSAP/SELL).<br />Three observations of the participant’s teaching by any colleague (e.g. programme member or departmental colleague).<br />One observation by the participant of any other colleague.<br />Teaching observations may be undertaken in any order and at any point during the qualification, involving teaching in any context (not only lectures but seminars, tutorials, supervisions, practical classes, fieldwork, video conferencing or e-learning activities). In the case of a one-to-one event, the permission of the student involved should be secured.<br />The teaching observer should use the observation form, available from: http://www.aber.ac.uk/staffdevelopment/english/tHEscheme.htm. This is designed to provide a structure for the conversation between observer and participant.<br />Teaching observations are assessed as part of the end-of-course portfolio. Each teaching observation form should be included in the portfolio. It is particularly important to complete the final page of the teaching observation form, outlining any professional development taking place as a result of the observation.<br />2.4.7Individual and Group Meetings<br />Optional individual and group meetings provide a useful source of support for participants undertaking the PGCTHE.<br />Group meetings are organised by the programme team and occur roughly once a month. The agenda for group meetings is usually set by the group, with a variety of practical and scholarly topics providing the basis for discussion. In addition, the programme team organises a series of reading group meetings where relevant literature on education in higher education is discussed.<br />Both group meetings and reading groups are run roughly once per month. Details for sessions running from September 2008 to January 2009 can be found in appendix 6 but please check the website for any changes. You will also be alerted by email.<br />Individual meetings can be arranged with the programme team at any point. Individual meetings are useful for addressing specific issues concerning teaching and/or the portfolio as they arise during the course of the programme. The agenda for individual meetings is determined by the participant. Participants can also contact the programme team to arrange a viewing of previous portfolios.<br />2.5Study Calendar <br />The PGCTHE normally takes four semesters to complete, although the maximum period before submission is six semesters. The following table provides an indicative study calendar for the PGCTHE (each rectangle = month).Sem. 1Sem. 2Sem. 3Sem. 4Induction ActivitiesPre-course briefingResidential Induction (2 days)3rd day induction at AberystwythTeaching Cycles First Teaching CyclePresent First Teaching CycleSecond Teaching CycleThird Teaching CycleCPD WorkshopsCore Workshops (6)Optional Workshops (2)Mentor meetingsMentor meetings (3 per sem.)Teaching ObservationsObservations by mentor (2)Observation by CDSAPObservations by staff (3)Observation of colleague (1)Group and Individual MeetingsGroup meetingsIndividual meetingsSubmissions of PortfolioIntention to submit formFinal preparation of portfolioMentor reads and approvesSubmission of portfolio<br />2.6Introductory Resources<br />2.6.1 Websites<br />Higher Education Academy: a large searchable database of accessible resources related to most themes in teaching and learning www.heacademy.ac.uk. Includes:<br />Supporting Learning: brief and usually accessible papers on a range of learning and teaching issues. Very useful for planning teaching cycles. http://www.heacademy.ac.uk/44.htm<br />Subject Centres: each discipline has a dedicated website containing resources and initiatives on teaching www.heacademy.ac.uk/SubjectNetwork.htm<br />Supporting New Academic Staff (SNAS): with resources for new teaching staff www.heacademy.ac.uk/snas<br />“Deliberations”: Teaching and Learning in Higher Education www.londonmet.ac.uk/deliberations<br />Oxford Centre for Staff and Learning Development: http://www.brookes.ac.uk/services/ocsd/2_learntch/2_learnt.html<br />2.6.2Booklist <br />Biggs, J (2003) Teaching for quality learning in higher education, 2nd edition, Buckingham: SRHE/Open University Press. <br />Fry, H, Ketteridge, S & Marshall, S (eds) (1999) A handbook for teaching and learning in higher education – enhancing academic practice. London: Kogan Page.<br />Raaheim, K (1991) Helping students to learn. Milton Keynes: Open University Press.<br />Race, P (2001) The lecturer’s toolkit, 2nd edition, London: Kogan Page<br />Radnor, H (2002) Researching your professional practice. Buckingham: Open University Press.<br />Ramsden, P (2003) Learning to teach in higher education. London: Routledge Falmer.<br />2.6.3Journals available online<br />http://www.aber.ac.uk/is/ejournals/<br />Active Learning in Higher Education<br />Arts and Humanities in Higher Education<br />Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education<br />Higher Education Quarterly<br />Journal of Further and Higher Education<br />Quality in Higher Education<br />Studies in Higher Education<br />2.6.4VodCast and PodCast Recourses<br />Nottingham University (Promoting Enhanced Student Learning Project): lecturers speaking about their teaching with examples of actual teaching.<br />http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/teaching/video/browse/techniques/<br />Section 3: Assessment<br />3.1The Portfolio<br />The PGCTHE is assessed through an end-of-course portfolio. A teaching portfolio is a personal record of your professional development as a HE educator. It consists of a carefully selected collection of material gathered from your teaching work. These are collated into a structured, evidenced presentation of your achievement of the learning outcomes for the programme. The PGCTHE is assessed via a portfolio because it provides a way for individual participants in different teaching contexts to evidence the development of their own expertise. <br />In brief, the required content for the PGCTHE portfolio is:<br />A matrix index <br />The induction assignments<br />Three teaching cycle reports<br />CPD Workshop reports<br />Teaching observation records<br />A personal commentary<br />References and sources<br />The portfolio can be presented in any appropriate format, such as a ring binder or a bound document. Please do not put everything in plastic pockets (except the induction poster) as this makes it difficult to read.<br />Although there is no word limit for the portfolio, as an indication the whole portfolio normally contains approximately 35-40 sides of A4 written commentary, plus additional evidence required to support the text. <br />3.1.1The Portfolio Matrix Index<br />One of the most important elements of the portfolio is the index. This normally takes the form of a matrix identifying where in the portfolio the participant has evidenced their performance of the learning outcomes, which is used by the assessment panel to arrive at an assessment decision.<br />An indicative version of such a matrix, mapping where the portfolio provides opportunities to demonstrate the learning outcomes, is shown overleaf. Participants should produce a similar matrix with page numbers to indicate where assessors can find evidence of attainment of the learning outcomes. A model index can be downloaded from http://www.aber.ac.uk/staffdevelopment/english/tHEscheme.htm.<br />3.1.2The Induction Assignments<br />This section includes all written work produced as part of the Residential Induction (see section 2.4.2), including:<br />The Short Statement on “Learning and Studying at University.<br />The poster representing the first teaching cycle.<br />3.1.3Three Teaching Cycle Reports<br />For each teaching cycle, the portfolio should present a report accompanied by selected supporting evidence. Each report is normally approximately 6 sides of A4. The report should be fully referenced and supported by appropriate evidence.<br />As set out in section 2.4.3, the report will normally contain:<br />An account of the issue including reference to appropriate literature on teaching and learning in HE.<br />A plan highlighting proposed teaching practice, intended outcomes and method of evaluation.<br />Progress notes on teaching practice and any interim modifications.<br />Summary of relevant data and feedback on student learning.<br />Evaluation of student learning experience in relation to intended outcomes.<br />Comments on implications for professional development of teaching practice. <br />The teaching cycle reports are the most substantial part of the portfolio, and provide participants with the best opportunity to demonstrate their attainment of the learning outcomes to assessors. Participants are advised to ensure that the three teaching cycle reports make a clear and convincing case to assessors that all learning outcomes have been addressed.<br />3.1.4First Teaching Cycle Presentation<br />At the end of your second semester of registration you will be require to make a presentation of your first teaching cycle. The presentations aim to provide feedback on your teaching practice at an early stage of the PGCTHE process. The presentations are a mandatory and open event and will be attended by your mentor, other candidates from the PGCTHE, senior members of academic staff and other members of the university staff. The presentations are chaired by members of CDSAP or invited external chairs including the external examiner.<br />Each presentation is ten minutes with ten minutes for questions. Candidates wishing to present through the medium of Welsh should contact CDSAP at least six weeks before the presentations in order for simultaneous translation to be arranged.<br />3.1.5CPD Workshop Reports<br />For each Continuing Professional Development (CPD) workshop participants should include a report, normally of one to two sides of A4. Previous participants have found it easier to write the report immediately after the workshop. The report may include:An account of the key issues in which you have gained knowledge.<br />Your critical assessment of the knowledge gained, particularly from your disciplinary perspective.<br />How you might integrate your new understanding with your teaching practice<br />What further Continuing Professional Development might be useful in this area.<br />3.1.6Teaching Observation Reports<br />The portfolio should include a total of 7 teaching observation forms resulting from the teaching observations outlined in section 2.4.6. The teaching observation forms offer an important opportunity to demonstrate to the assessor how your professional skills have developed, and how you are able to make use of teaching observations as an important evaluative technique to improve your teaching and inform your professional development.<br />3.1.7Personal Commentary<br />The final substantial part of the portfolio requires a Personal Commentary which is usually written at the end of the programme once the remainder of the portfolio is complete. The aim of the Personal Commentary is to evaluate how your understanding of learning and teaching in your own particular workplace context has developed through the course of the programme. You may find it useful to refer back to the statement you wrote in advance of the Residential Induction. The Personal Commentary provides an opportunity to demonstrate to the assessors how you have critically engaged with academic understandings of learning and teaching, and integrated your engagement with your teaching practice and professional development.<br />The Personal Commentary is usually 5-10 pages of A4, and should include:<br />A brief account of your personal history in learning and teaching.<br />A brief presentation of your current teaching context.<br />A discussion of your personal understanding of learning and teaching in higher education.<br />Your plans for future Continuing Professional Development.<br />3.1.8References and Sources<br />All references and sources should be cited in the text and referenced in a bibliography according the academic norms of your own discipline.<br />Indicative matrix on potential opportunities to evidence performance of learning outcomes (X)<br />Learning Outcomes: “Demonstrate development of professional ability to….:”Induction AssignmentsTeaching Cycle 1Teaching Cycle 2Teaching Cycle 3CPD CommentaryTeaching Observation RecordsPersonal Commentary1Design and plan effective learning opportunities, resources and/or programmes of study.XXXXXX2Select and perform a range of teaching methods to support learning.XXXXX3Design and implement effective assessment schemes, and provide feedback to learners.XXXXX4Develop environments for learning that offer effective student support and guidance.XXXXX5Integrate scholarly, research based knowledge of learning with the practices of teaching and supporting learning.XXXXX6Evaluate the impact of teaching using a range of monitoring methods, and use to plan the development of professional practices.XXXX<br />3.2Portfolio Assessment Criteria<br />To pass, a portfolio includes all the elements listed in 3.1., and must evidence the knowledge and skills required for Learning Outcomes 1 to 6. The assessment criteria used by assessors reflects the evidence required to demonstrate the achievement of the Learning Outcomes. Assessors are asked to consider the following (taken from the assessment form):<br />Assessment Form<br />“The Postgraduate Certificate in Teaching in Higher Education is an M level programme. The AU Generic Level Description to be applied in assessing participants is:<br />LEVEL M: Display mastery of a complex and specialized area of knowledge and skills, employing advanced skills to conduct research, or advanced technical and professional activity, accepting responsibility for all related decision making including supervision and, in appropriate circumstances, the guidance of others.<br />(1) Knowledge and Skills in Teaching: What evidence is there that the participant has demonstrated and evaluated their professional ability in the following areas of activity? Please assess the evidence that the participant has demonstrated their knowledge of key issues and the development of their practical skills within their particular work context.<br />(i)The design and planning of effective learning opportunities, resources and/or programmes of study?<br />(ii)The range of teaching methods that can be used to support learning?<br />(iii)The design and implementation of effective assessment schemes, and their use to give feedback to learners?<br />(iv)The development of effective learning environments, student support and guidance?<br />(2)What evidence is there that the participant has integrated their engagement with scholarship and research on learning with their teaching? Please assess evidence of the participant’s knowledge of scholarship and research on learning, and their ability to use their engagement with this knowledge to inform decisions about teaching in their own particular context. <br />(3)What evidence is there that the participant has evaluated the impact of their teaching on student learning? Please assess evidence of the participant’s knowledge of the purpose of evaluations of learning, and their ability use appropriate techniques to gain feedback within their own particular teaching context.<br />(4)Does the portfolio as a whole provide evidence that the participant has used their experience and knowledge of teaching to develop professionally?”<br />3.3Submission of Portfolio<br />There are two submission opportunities per year, usually immediately preceding Christmas and after Easter (for dates see http://www.aber.ac.uk/staffdevelopment/english/tHEscheme.htm). Portfolios may be submitted on any submission opportunity up to three years after registration.<br />Candidates should send in the ‘Intention to submit’ form at least 8 weeks before the intended submission date (available from http://www.aber.ac.uk/staffdevelopment/english/tHEscheme.htm.), so that appropriate assessors from adjoining disciplines can be booked. Please indicate on the form if you intend to submit through the medium of Welsh so that Welsh speaking assessors can be approached (see Appendix 1 for further information about language).<br />All portfolios require a letter from the mentor indicating that he or she has read the submission, and confirming that the participant has addressed all the Learning Outcomes for the programme. Any additional comments on the candidate are also welcome. Mentors will need to be advised on the timetable to submission, particularly so they can allocate time to read the portfolio in advance.<br />Two copies of the portfolio should be submitted to the Centre for the Development of Staff and Academic Practice (G19, Cledwyn Building). Portfolios will only be accepted if there are two copies of the complete version, along with a mentor letter. A receipt will be provided for accepted portfolios.<br />3.4Assessment Panel<br />Each portfolio is assessed by two mentors acting as assessors, at least one of whom will have prior experience as an assessor. The assessors complete the assessment sheet (see 3.3 above) and where both agree their findings this recommendation will be forwarded to the examination board.<br />Where the assessors seek further clarification or evidence, they may decide to ask the candidate to provide further material or to attend a viva. Where the assessors disagree, the Internal Moderator will normally also assess the portfolio.<br />3.5Referrals and Fails<br />Where assessors judge that a portfolio does not meet the requirements to achieve a pass, the portfolio is referred. Referred portfolios will also be read by the internal moderator, and where the referral is agreed by the Examination Board, the candidate will be informed and given guidance concerning what needs to be done to demonstrate performance of the learning outcomes.<br />Referred portfolios must be submitted at the next submission date. Portfolios may be resubmitted on two occasions before the candidate is deemed to have failed the programme.<br />3.6PGCTHE Board of Studies<br />The Board of Studies meets twice each year to determine the award of a pass or fail to each participant. The External Examiner will also read a selection of the submissions. The Board of Studies is chaired by the Head of the School of Education and Lifelong Learning and consists of:<br />The AU PGCTHE coordinator<br />Course coordinators of each collaborating institution;<br />External Examiner<br />Internal moderator (nominated by SELL)<br />Participant Representatives<br />Representatives (usually mentors) from each department with staff on the scheme.<br />Assessors and programme lecturers may be invited to attend.<br />3.7Exit Points<br />The programme team are currently developing a 20 Credit Post Graduate Award for Teaching in Higher Education (PGA). Participants who are unable to complete the full qualification may, in consultation with the Learning and Teaching Development Coordinator, be able to transfer to the PGA. Please contact CDSAP for more information.<br />3.8Leaving Aberystwyth<br />If a candidate intends leaving the university for other employment during the period of registration, CDSAP should be informed immediately.<br />If the candidate is transferring to another Welsh HEI within the PGCTHE consortium, then that institution will assume responsibility for the completion of PGCTHE. If the candidate is moving outwith Wales then Aberystwyth University will not be able to support completion of the award.<br />Please contact CDSAP for more information.<br />Section 4: Information for Mentors<br />4.1Mentors<br />This section of the PGCTHE handbook provides information and guidance for departmental mentors about their role on the programme. It is designed to be read alongside the programme information provided in this handbook and mentors should ensure that they are familiar with Sections 2 and 3 on the programme and assessment procedures. As the PGCTHE is a work-based programme of learning where participants use their work experience to evaluate and develop their professional skills and knowledge, mentors play a particularly important role as an experienced member of staff with a close and detailed working knowledge of the participant’s department and discipline and environment<br />Mentors are assigned to new members of staff by their Department as part of Aberystwyth University’s mentoring scheme. The Academic Staff Handbook provides details of the scheme (see http://www.aber.ac.uk/en/staff/academic-handbook/appoint/section08.php), including the responsibilities of mentors across all areas of the new staff member’s work.<br />For the purposes of the PGCTHE, the mentor acts as a ‘critical friend’ who provides a source of support and discussion for the work involved in the PGCTHE. The mentor will have experience of teaching in the participant’s discipline. He or she will also be aware of the departmental context, and will be able to advise on issues with which participants will engage as they progress through the programme. Briefly, mentor activities include:<br />Attending “Effective Mentoring” training where appropriate (see section 4.2).<br />Attending lunch with participants on Day 3 of Induction, at AU (see 4.3.1).<br />Attending a briefing meeting for mentors by the programme team (see 4.2).<br />Holding mentor meetings with their mentee three times per semester (see 4.2.2)<br />Undertaking two teaching observations (see 4.3.3)<br />Attending mentee’s presentation of first teaching cycle (see 2.4.3 and 4.3.4)<br />Reading mentee’s portfolio prior to submission (see 4.3.5).<br />Confirming the mentee has addressed the learning outcomes (see 4.3.5).<br />Assessing portfolios through occasional attendance at an assessment panel (see 4.3.6)<br />4.2Mentor Training and Programme Briefing<br />General training on “Effective Mentoring”, in support of AU’s mentor scheme, is provided by the Centre for the Development of Staff and Academic Practice and is available to all staff as required. Training sessions are normally held at the beginning of each semester (see http://public.mis.aber.ac.uk/staffdev/list_courses.php for more details).<br />A programme briefing for mentors is offered at the beginning of each mentee’s registration on the programme. The briefing provides details of the programme and the mentor’s role. Dates for mentor briefings will be circulated by email.<br />4.3Mentor Responsibilities<br />4.3.1Induction<br />Mentors attend lunch at AU with participants and the programme team on Day 3 of the PGCTHE induction. This is designed to provide mentors with an insight into the work undertaken on the induction and the participants’ plans for their first teaching cycle. Further details will be circulated prior to inductions (see 2.4.2 for further information on the induction).<br />4.3.2Mentor Meetings<br />Mentors and mentees normally meet three times per semester. This is the most important aspect of mentoring, and mentees are strongly advised to make a record of meetings and intended actions to ensure discussions have continuity and direction. A pro-forma to support this if required is available from http://www.aber.ac.uk/staffdevelopment/english/tHEscheme.htm.<br />The content of mentor meetings is determined by the participant, but will normally include discussions linked to work undertaken during the programme including:<br />Programme Planning: Much of the learning undertaken by participants on the PGCTHE is based on their normal teaching work. The programme has a great deal of flexibility to allow for participants in different kinds of work contexts. However, it is the responsibility of participants to plan the work involved in the qualification. The first mentor meeting will normally involve constructing a plan of work that will enable the participant to complete the qualification. A ‘Milestones’ pro-forma is available from http://www.aber.ac.uk/staffdevelopment/english/tHEscheme.htm. to support this exercise. The pro-forma sets out the major tasks involved in the PGCTHE, and ask participants to map when they aim to complete these tasks.<br />The ‘Milestones’ pro-forma can also form the basis for subsequent mentor meetings, as it can be used to assess progress to date and amended accordingly. Where mentors have a concern about potential problems with the time-management of the qualification, it is important that this is raised with the participant and/or the department at an early stage.<br />Teaching Cycles (see section 2.4.3): The three teaching cycles form the most important and substantial part of the participant’s portfolio, and it is crucial that mentors offer support in the development of each cycle. The teaching cycles offer the principal means through which participants meet the learning outcomes for the programme, and concrete evidence to be included in the portfolio is a core consideration for each teaching cycle. In particular mentors and participants should carefully consider the following questions:<br />Choosing a focus: Which learning outcomes will the issue enable the participant to evidence? Will the three teaching cycles as a whole enable the participant to attain all learning outcomes?<br />Scholarship and Research: Has the participant engaged with the scholarship and research on this issue? Has the participant engaged with any discipline specific resources e.g. Learning and Teaching Subject Networks? Where can the participant gain informal advice?<br />Aims and outcomes of teaching cycle: What are the expected outcomes of the teaching cycles for student learning? Does the project have realistic aims given the participant’s time resources and constraints?<br />Departmental Context: Is the teaching cycle feasible within the departmental context? What are the quality assurance implications of the teaching cycle? Will approval be needed from the Degree Scheme Coordinator and/or Learning & Teaching Committee? Will Faculty require documentation (e.g. “Approval of New or Restructured Module Form”)? Can this be done within a realistic timeframe?<br />Planning the Cycle: When, where and how will the participant undertake the teaching practice in question? Which students will be involved? How will the cycle progress? What opportunities for interim modifications are available?<br />Gaining Feedback: How will the participant gain concrete feedback on the impact on student learning? What techniques are suitable for assessing the impact? Does the teaching cycle need contingency plans if these techniques do not work as intended?<br />Evaluating feedback: What techniques will be used to collate, evaluate and assess the feedback in order to arrive at conclusions? How successful has the participant been in their evaluation?<br />Using the results: What are the implications of the teaching cycle for the participant’s future teaching practice?<br />Please note that participants are required to present their first teaching cycle at a formal event, which mentors are asked to attend – see 4.3.3 below for details.<br />Continuing Professional Development<br />During the PGCTHE participants attend a CPD programme in which they develop their knowledge of scholarship, research and professional practice in teaching and learning, including their understanding of how students learn. They are also asked to critically evaluate this knowledge, and to apply it in their own teaching contexts. Given that mentors have a close working knowledge of teaching and learning in the participant’s discipline, a further role of mentor meetings is to provide participants with the opportunity to discuss and evaluate their knowledge in all areas of teaching activity.<br />To support the work of participants in developing their knowledge, mentors are referred to the indicative content and associated resources listed in Appendix 2.<br />4.3.3Teaching Observations<br />As set out in section 2.4.6, participants undertake seven teaching observations. Two of these observations are carried out by the mentor. The timing of these observations is determined by the participant in conjunction with the mentor, although it is suggested that the mentor undertake the first observation within the first few weeks of the semester. Records of teaching observations and associated discussions should be kept by completing the Teaching Observation form available from http://www.aber.ac.uk/staffdevelopment/english/tHEscheme.htm.<br />The teaching observations are important to participants as evidence of their practical skills in teaching and learning, and represent a key means of gaining feedback for professional development. Encouraging participants to complete the teaching observation forms in full should ensure there is ample evidence to present in their portfolio.<br />4.3.4PGCTHE Presentations<br />Mentors are asked to attend their mentee’s presentation of the first teaching cycle at a presentation event, usually at the end of their second semester of registration (see section 2.4.3).<br />The presentation event provides participants with the opportunity to receive feedback from their peers, the programme team, mentors, AU staff, assessors and examiners. Each participant makes a 10 minute presentation, and time will be allocated for questions and feedback. The feedback will enable participants to evaluate their own teaching cycle and develop their future teaching practice. Feedback from the presentation event can also be included in the portfolio. Further details of dates and venues can be found at http://www.aber.ac.uk/staffdevelopment/english/tHEscheme.htm.<br />4.3.5Submission of Portfolio<br />Mentors are required to read the participant’s portfolio prior to submission and to provide an indication of whether they believe the portfolio addresses the learning outcomes. This can be done by completing an assessment sheet (available from http://www.aber.ac.uk/staffdevelopment/english/tHEscheme.htm). Mentors may wish to give other additional information to help the assessors. This should be returned to the participant for inclusion in their portfolio.<br />Please see section 3.3 for further information on the submission of portfolios.<br />4.3.6Assessment of Portfolios<br />Mentors across the University are asked to take part in portfolio assessment panels from time to time. Feedback suggests this provides a useful means of developing an understanding of the standards expected by the programme. Separate guidelines will accompany such a request. Assessment panels normally take place in January and May. The programme team will contact mentors to request attendance at an assessment panel as appropriate.<br />Appendix 1<br />Information on Languages<br />The Postgraduate Certificate of Teaching in Higher Education conforms to the requirements of the university of Wales Welsh Language scheme (see http://www.aber.ac.uk/canolfangymraeg/admin/languagescheme/index.html).<br />In order to assist the Programme coordinator to facilitate the use of Welsh on the programme, participants are asked to provide the following information at various stages of the programme.<br />Residential Induction (see section 2.4.2): every effort is made to ensure that group activities, particularly of participants statements on “Teaching and Studying at University” and the presentation, can be conducted through Welsh, English or bilingually. Participants are asked to state their preferred language when they complete the “Confirmation for Residential Induction” form. (see http://www.aber.ac.uk/staffdevelopment/english/tHEinfopost06.htm<br />Teaching Cycles (2.4.3); following their first teaching cycle, participants take part in a presentation event involving the programme team, fellow participants, mentors and other university staff. Participants wishing to present through the medium of Welsh are asked to advise the programme team so the arrangements can be made for simultaneous translation.<br />Departmental Mentor Meetings (2.4.5): as departments are responsible for assigning a mentor to staff, participants who would prefer mentor meetings to be available through the medium of Welsh are advised to discuss this with their Department.<br />Teaching Observations (2.4.6): Participants are observed by mentors, the programme team and colleagues. Where staff teach through the medium of Welsh, arrangements can be made for a Welsh <br />speaking member of the programme team to undertake the observation.<br />Submission of Portfolio (3.3): in common with all assessment at AU, portfolios may be submitted through Welsh, English or bilingually. Where staff expect to use Welsh in their portfolio, they are asked to advise the programme team when completing the “Intention to Submit” form (see http://www.aber.ac.uk/staffdevelopment/english/tHEinfopost06.htm) so that Welsh speaking assessors may be approached.<br />Appendix 2:Indicative content and resources for mentor meetings<br />Design and planning of learning activities and/or programmes of study.<br />Planning a moduleBaume, D (2003) Designing courses and modules. http://www.brookes.ac.uk/services/ocsd/firstwords/fw3con.htmlConstructive alignment Biggs, J. (2003) Teaching for Quality Learning at University (chapter 2 “Constructing learning by aligning teaching: constructive alignment). OU Press: Maidenhead.Defining Objectives for LearningBiggs, J. (2003) Teaching for Quality Learning at University (chapter 3 “Formulating and Clarifying Curriculum Objectives). OU Press: Maidenhead.Designing and Using Learning OutcomeJackson, N, Wisdom, J and Shaw, M (2003) Guide for Busy Academics: Using Learning Outcomes to Design. Available at http://www.heacademy.ac.uk/836.htmExternal requirements in planning e.g. QAShaw, M. (2002) Contexts for Curriculum Design : working with external pressures. Available at http://www.heacademy.ac.uk/837.htm<br />Teaching and/or supporting student learning<br />Large group teachingBaume, D. (2003) First Words on Teaching and Learning. http://www.brookes.ac.uk/services/ocsd/firstwords/fw1con.htmlSmall group teachingRace, P. (2001) The Lecturer’s Toolkit (chapter 4 “Making small-group teaching work). Kogan Page: London.E-LearningLittlejohn, A and Higgison, C (2003) E-learning Series no 3: A Guide for Teachers. http://tinyurl.com/jesg6Supervising ResearchMarshall, S (1999) “Supervising Projects and Dissertations”, in Fry, H., Ketteridge, S and Marshall, S (eds.) A Handbook for Teaching and Learning in HE. Kogan Page: London (pp 108-119).Managing classroom difficultiesBaume, D (2004) Managing Classroom Difficulties. http://tinyurl.com/z7njg<br />Assessment and giving feedback to learners<br />Aligning learning and assessmentRust, C (2002) Purposes and principles of assessment. http://tinyurl.com/lc4ugSelecting assessmentBiggs, J. (2003) Teaching for Quality Learning at University (chapter 9 “Assessing for learning quality II: practice”). OUP: Maidenhead.Giving feedbackStudent Enhanced Learning through Effective Feedback http://www.heacademy.ac.uk/senlef.htmFormative assessment techniquesRace, P (2003) The Lecturer’s Toolkit (“Feedback and Assessment” pp 68-80.Assessing group workBaume, D. (2002) Assessing Group Work. http://www.brookes.ac.uk/services/ocsd/firstwords/fw26.html<br />Developing effective environments and student support and guidance.<br />What is student support for?Wallace, J (1999) Supporting and Guiding Students, in Fry, H., Ketteridge, S and Marshall, S (eds.) A Handbook for Teaching and Learning in HE. Kogan Page: London (pp 175-187).Support for students with disabilityPlanet Special Edition: Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (designed for Geography Subject Network but provides a good overview of issues http://www.gees.ac.uk/pubs/planet/senda.pdfResource based learningRace, P (2001) The Lecturer’s Toolkit (chapter 5 “Resource based learning”). Kogan Page: London.Personal Development PlanningGuides for Busy Academics: PDP http://www.heacademy.ac.uk/963.htm<br />Integration of scholarship, research and professional activities with teaching and supporting learning.<br />Understanding student learningFry, H., Ketteridge, S and Marshall, S (1999) “Understanding Student Learning” in Fry, H., Ketteridge, S and Marshall, S (eds.) A Handbook for Teaching and Learning in HE. Kogan Page: London (pp 21-40)Integrating teaching and researchJenkins A “Designing a curriculum that values a research-based approach to student learning” http://tinyurl.com/ngd8nDiscipline specific teaching issuesSee Higher Education Academies Subject Network http://www.heacademy.ac.uk/SubjectNetwork.htmReflective PracticeBiggs, J. (2003) Teaching for Quality Learning at University (chapter 12 “The Reflective Teacher”. OUP: Maidenhead.<br />Evaluation of practice and continuing professional development.<br />Gaining feedbackBaume, D (2006) Monitoring and Evaluating Teaching. http://www.brookes.ac.uk/services/ocsd/firstwords/fw4con.htmlTeaching observationsFullerton, H (1999) “Observation of Teaching” in Fry, H, Marshall, S and Ketteridge, S (eds.) A Handbook for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education. Kogan Page: London (pp. 220-234)Action LearningBeatty, L (2003) Action Learning, available at http://www.heacademy.ac.uk/985.htmContinuing Professional DevelopmentPartington, P (1999) “Continuing Professional Development” in Fry, H, Marshall, S and Ketteridge, S (eds.) A Handbook for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education. Kogan Page: London (pp. 247-262)Managing WorkloadsRace, P (2001) The Lecturer’s Toolkit (chapter 6 “Looking After Yourself”. Kogan Page: London. <br />Appendix 3: Forms<br />AU PGCTHE MILESTONES<br />Sem. 1Sem. 2Sem. 3Sem. 4Induction ActivitiesPre-course briefingResidential Induction (2 days)3rd day induction at AberystwythTeaching Cycles First Teaching CyclePresent First Teaching CycleSecond Teaching CycleThird Teaching CycleCPD WorkshopsCore Workshops (6)Optional Workshops (2)Mentor meetingsMentor meetings (3 per sem.)Teaching ObservationsObservations by mentor (2)Observation by CDSAPObservations by staff (3)Observation of colleague (1)Group and Individual MeetingsGroup meetingsIndividual meetingsSubmissions of PortfolioIntention to submit formFinal preparation of portfolioMentor reads and approvesSubmission of portfolio<br />Grid can be used to insert indication of when milestones are to be achieved in order to plan work and evaluate progress to completion of programme.<br />AU PGCTHE Meeting with Mentor<br />Candidate Name: ………………………………………………………………………….<br />Date: ……………………………………………………………………………………………..<br />This form records the purposes and outcomes of a meeting with your Mentor.<br />What do you want to get out of this meeting?<br />Topics for discussion.<br />Outcomes and planned actions.<br />Candidate Signature____________________________________________________________________<br />Mentor Signature______________________________________________________________________<br />Date________________________________________________________________________________<br />A copy should be filed in you portfolio.<br />A copy should be given to your Mentor.<br />AU PGCTHE Teaching Cycle Agreement<br />You should discuss your planned teaching cycle with your Mentor, and consider how you plan to gather feedback and evaluate what happened.<br />Class/Module:The module description (intended learning outcomes, teaching and learning strategies and assessment methods may be attached).<br />Level_________________________________Semester_____________________________Meetings (timetable)____________________Numbers in class_______________________Venue________________________________The intended development:-Issue to be addressedSources of appropriate scholarship on issueIntended outcome for students?How will the teaching practice be implemented?What feedback on student learning will be produced?What opportunities will there be for modification along the way (if any)?What criteria will be used to evaluate the success of the teaching cycle?Candidate Signature__________________________________________________________________Mentor Signature____________________________________________________________Date______________________________________________________________________A copy should be filed in you portfolio.A copy should be given to your Mentor.<br />AU PGCTHE Teaching Observation Form<br />You should discuss your teaching observations with your Mentor, and consider how you plan to gather feedback and evaluate the session<br />Name of CandidateDateName of ObserverNumbers in class GroupLocationTopics Start TimeFinish TimeLearning OutcomesAim/ sAny particular factors/problem taken into account when planning the session?Any changes made since similar previous sessions? (if applicable)Any aspects of this session which are new to you?How have you incorporated suggestions made previously? (if applicable)Do you wish to be given advice on any particular aspect of your teaching in this session?Observer’s CommentsTeaching Characteristics: Preparation, selection of aim/objectives, statement of aim and learning outcomes. Selection and organisation of content. Planning. Choice of teaching/learning methodsPresentation: Beginning class, introduction, continuity with other sessions, students’ prior knowledge. Clarity of presentation. Pace. Attitude to subject matter. Use of appropriate reinforcement. Ending the session – summary, future work etc.Technique and Aids: General apparatus – board, OHP, data projector, use of handouts. Question and answer technique. Other evaluation procedures, class management, instructions to students.Student Responses: General class atmosphere, level of participation, attention and interest. Student attitude and ability to carry out classwork. Were learning problems identified and overcome? Awareness of individual needs. Attitude to students.General: Was effective communication achieved? Was there good student – teacher rapport? Were the outcomes achieved? Appropriateness of teaching/learning methodsFuture areas of focus:Strengths:<br />Course Member’s Notes and Observation(Please complete after your post-session discussion with your observer.)How helpful were the comments about the observation?In the light of the comments made are you likely to make any changes?Any further comments about the session and observation?Candidate Signature____________________________________________________________________Mentor Signature______________________________________________________________________Date______________________________________________________________________________A copy should be filed in you portfolio.A copy should be given to your Mentor.<br />AU PGCTHE Intention to Submit<br />You should complete this form at least 8 weeks before you plan to submit your portfolio. The form should be forwarded to the Centre for the Development of Staff and Academic Practice in the Cledwyn building.<br />Name:<br />Department:<br />Tel: <br />Email:<br />Group Number:<br />Expected Date of Submission: <br />Is the submission through the medium of Welsh? <br />Is this a Resubmission? (Yes/No) <br />Signed: <br />Date: <br />Mentor<br />Name:<br />Department:<br />Signature:<br />Appendix 4<br />Glossary of Terms, Abbreviations and Acronyms<br />Term or AbbreviationTitleDefinitionAHEAAssociate Fellow of the Higher Education AcademyConferred status for successful completion of the HEA-accredited PGCTHEAUAberystwyth UniversityYour employing institution.CandidateA member of teaching staff registered on the PGCTHE.CDSAPCentre for the Development of Staff and Academic PracticeAberystwyth University Academic and Educational Staff Development UnitCPDContinuing Professional DevelopmentWithin the context of the PGCTHE or PGA this means workshops aligned to each of the six areas of activity as defined by the UK PSF.FHEAFellow of the Higher Education AcademyConferred status for successful completion of the HEA-accredited PGCTHE HEAHigher Education AcademyThe central UK institution charged with enhancing the quality of teaching and learning in Higher EducationHEFCWHigher Education Funding Council for WalesThe intermediary body between the Welsh Assembly Government and the higher education sector in Wales.LTDCLearning and Teaching Development CoordinatorEmployed by SELL but working from CDSAP. Responsible for all aspects of the PGCTHE & PGA. Advises Academic Affairs , PAC and other committees on learning and teaching issuesMenteeThe term used to refer to a PGCTHE candidate when corresponding to a mentor.MentorA member of staff assigned to act as your teaching and learning advisor for the duration of the PGCTHE / PGA. PGAPost graduate award20 credit Level M module in teaching and learning in higher educationPGCTHEPostgraduate Certificate for Teaching in Higher Education60 credit Level M module in teaching and learning in higher educationPSFProfessional Standards Framework for Teaching and Supporting Learning in Higher EducationThe framework is a descriptor to demonstrate application of six areas of activity, core knowledge and professional values within the institution’s professional development programmesSELLSchool of Education and Lifelong LearningAberystwyth University department which owns the PGCTHE and PGA qualifications.Teaching CycleAction research project designed to develop a reflective and evaluative approach to teaching and learning.<br />Appendix 5:PGCTHE Dates 2009/2010 <br />Induction<br />Group 20: Starting January 2010<br />
      • Pre Induction Course (Mandatory): 11 December 2009:  10:00 - 10:00
      • Residential Induction (Mandatory): 5 / 6 January 2010: Plas Tan Y Bwlch
      • 3rd Day at Aberystwyth University (Mandatory): 11 January 2010: Aberystwyth University
      Learning and Teaching Conference (1st Teaching Cycle Presentation)<br />January 2010<br />Date: 28 January 2010<br />Time: 14:00 - 18:00<br />Location:CDSAP Training Room, Visualisation Centre<br />April 2009<br />Date: 13 April 2010<br />Time: 09:00 – 13:00<br />Location:CDSAP Training Room, Visualisation Centre<br />June 2010<br />Date: 17 June 2010<br />Time: 14:00 - 18:00<br />Location:CDSAP Training Room, Visualisation Centre<br />PGCTHE Staff Candidate Consultative Forum<br />January 2009<br />Date:19 January 2010<br />Time:12:00 -13:00 <br />Location:CDSAP Training Room, Visualisation Centre for 29 January 2010 Board of Studies<br />June 2010<br />Date:3 June 2010 <br />Time:12:00 -13:00 <br />Location:CDSAP Training Room, Visualisation Centre for 18 June 2010 Board of Studies<br />Portfolio Submission<br /> June 2010 Board of Studies<br />Reminder e-mail sent to participants: 15 January 2010<br />Intention to Submit Form: 26 February 2010 (by 12:00) <br />Portfolio Submission Date: 23 April 2010 (by 12:00)<br />Assessment Panel Meeting: 21 May 2010<br />PGCTHE Board of Studies: 18 June 2010<br />Appendix 6: Programme of CPD Sessions<br />The most up to date version of the CPD programme is available online at: https://secure.mis.aber.ac.uk/staffdev/sd/list_courses.php Courses are also booked online. Please remember that there is a charge of £10 for non-attendance. <br />Appendix 7:PGCTHE Residential Induction Programme<br />Vision<br />“Our vision is to create an inspirational, challenging and experiential learning environment in which all participants will learn something new and take away some skills, tools or knowledge which will motivate them, further realise their potential, and enable them to make more informed choices about the development of their teaching.”<br />Aims and objectives of the residential <br />Aim: <br />To provide practitioners with an opportunity to reflect and share their conceptions of teaching and introduce them to some of the key areas contained within the Professional Standards Framework.<br />Objectives:<br />1. Provide opportunities for practitioners to discuss their philosophy on teaching and gain feedback from peers in an informal setting.<br />2. Introduce a number of perspectives with associated examples designed to inform learning and teaching.<br />3. Create an atmosphere conducive to planning for teaching interventions within different disciplines<br />Preparation for the Residential<br />1. A short learning statement entitled: ‘Reflect on your experience as a learner and discuss how this will influence your approach to teaching and supporting learning in your discipline’ (1-2 pages). This piece represents your thoughts and perceptions on teaching and learning in higher education, in particular, in your subject area. It is intended to be reflective and to provide a basis for discussion. In this way, it does not need to be heavily referenced. It will provide a baseline from which to develop professionally as a teacher and facilitator of learning. <br />2. During the induction, each programme participant will give a 10 minute presentation to a small group on a topic relating to their teaching and learning. The presentation may be delivered in any way chosen by participant.<br />Recommended reading prior to residential<br />Biggs, J. (1996). Aligning teaching for constructing learning. York, Higher Education Academy <br />Bransford, J. D., Brown, A. L. and Cooking, R, R. (Eds) (1999). How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School (Chapter 2) Washington DC National Academy Press <br />Cousin, G. (2009). Researching Learning in Higher Education. London Routledge (Chapter 12)<br />Fry, H., Ketteridge, S, and Marshall, S. (2009) A Handbook for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education (3rd Edition) London, Routledge (Chapters 9 and 10)<br />Race, P (2006) The Lecturer’s Toolkit (3rd edition), London: Kogan Page. (Chapter 2)<br />STAFF<br />Course TutorsNameInstitutionRoles & ResponsibilitiesDr. Jo MaddernAberystwyth UniversityLearning and Teaching Development CoordinatorGraham LewisAberystwyth UniversityCoordinator, Centre for the Development of Staff & Academic PracticeGiles PolglaseAberystwyth UniversityAssistant Coordinator, Centre for the Development of Staff & Academic PracticeDr. Charles BuckleyBangor UniversityEducational DeveloperSue ClaytonBangor UniversityDirector Academic Development UnitPenny DowdneyBangor UniversityGraduate Skills CoordinatorDr. Gwyn LewisBangor UniversityDirector of Teaching and LearningEifion Lloyd JonesCentre for Welsh-Medium in Higher EducationFacilitatorChristine JonesTrinity St David’s UniversityHead of Welsh StudiesCarole Russell-WilliamsTrinity St David’s UniversityLecturer in EnglishAndrew Morgan Swansea UniversityStaff Development OfficerRuth MathesonUniversity of Wales Institute CardiffSue TangneyUniversity of Wales Institute Cardiff5th January 2010TIMEEVENTLEAD TUTORVENUEHow this session maps on to the UK Professional Standards Framework 10.30 a.m.Arrival, registration and coffeeAllReception10.30 a.m. Ice breakerAll11.00 a.m.Overview of the awardAndrew Morgan11.15 a.m.Learning statementsPractitioners work in groups Teaching and/or supporting student learning Developing effective environments and student support and guidance12.30 p.m.LunchDining room1.30 p.m.Models of learning and teachingSue TangneyRuth MathesonTeaching and/or supporting student learning3 p.m. Tea and coffee3.30 p.m. PresentationsVarious17.30Dinner18.30Bilingual teachingGwyn LewisDesign and planning of learning activities and/or programmes of studyDeveloping effective environments and student support and guidanceTeaching and/or supporting student learning20.30Finish, own time (bar opens 21.00)Bring money for bar / pub as no cash machine is available on site.<br />6th January 2010 TIME EVENTLEAD TUTORVENUEHow this session maps on to the UK Professional Standards Framework8.00Breakfast9.00Models of learning and teachingJo MaddernIntegration of scholarship, research and professional activities with teaching and supporting learningDesign and planning of learning activities and/or programmes of study10.30Coffee11.00Feedback/ assessment for learning rather than of learningAndrew MorganAssessment and giving feedback to learners12.30Lunch13.30Interventions through action researchSue TangneyIntegration of scholarship, research and professional activities with teaching and supporting learning15.00Plenary15.15Coffee break and depart<br />Following the Residential (Day 3)<br />You need to develop an A1 (flipchart) sized poster outlining a plan for your first proposed teaching intervention. It should include:<br />A description and evaluation of present teaching situation and participant’s rationale for undertaking professional development;<br />The teaching innovation participant wishes to apply, supported by theoretical underpinning;<br />The evaluation method the participant will use to assess its success;<br />Contact Details:<br />Dr. Jo Frances Maddern, BA (Hons), PhD.<br />Cydgysylltydd Datblygu Dysgu ac Addysgu / Learning and Teaching Development Co-ordinator<br />G19, Ganolfan Datblygu Staff ac Ymarfer Academaidd / G19, Centre for the Development of Staff and Academic Practice<br />Adeilad Cledwyn / Cledwyn Building,Campws Penglais / Penglais CampusAberystwythCeredigionSY23 3DD<br />Ffôn / Phone: 01970 628523<br />Ffacs / Fax: 01970 622982<br />http://www.aber.ac.uk/sell/staff/alist/jmaddern.htm<br />13716003499485http://www.aber.ac.uk/staffdevelopment/ <br />