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Simulating Lean Supply Chain Thinking
Simulating Lean Supply Chain Thinking
Simulating Lean Supply Chain Thinking
Simulating Lean Supply Chain Thinking
Simulating Lean Supply Chain Thinking
Simulating Lean Supply Chain Thinking
Simulating Lean Supply Chain Thinking
Simulating Lean Supply Chain Thinking
Simulating Lean Supply Chain Thinking
Simulating Lean Supply Chain Thinking
Simulating Lean Supply Chain Thinking
Simulating Lean Supply Chain Thinking
Simulating Lean Supply Chain Thinking
Simulating Lean Supply Chain Thinking
Simulating Lean Supply Chain Thinking
Simulating Lean Supply Chain Thinking
Simulating Lean Supply Chain Thinking
Simulating Lean Supply Chain Thinking
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Simulating Lean Supply Chain Thinking

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The Lean Supply Chain & Logistics Simulation game was discussed in the podcast, Why use a Lean Simulation Game? with Paul Myerson, author of Lean Supply Chain and Logistics Management. This is a …

The Lean Supply Chain & Logistics Simulation game was discussed in the podcast, Why use a Lean Simulation Game? with Paul Myerson, author of Lean Supply Chain and Logistics Management. This is a transcription of the podcast.

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  • 1. Business901 Podcast Transcription Implementing Lean Marketing Systems Sponsored bySimulating Lean Supply Chain Thinking Guest was Paul Myerson Related Podcast: Teaching Lean Supply Chain thru Simulation Teaching Lean Supply Chain thru Simulation Copyright Business901
  • 2. Business901 Podcast TranscriptionImplementing Lean Marketing SystemsPaul Myerson has been a successful change catalyst for clientsand organizations of all sizes. He has more than 25 years ofexperience in supply chain strategies, systems, and operationsthat have resulted in bottom-line improvements for companiessuch as General Electric, Unilever, and Church and Dwight. He iscurrently Managing Partner at Logistics Planning Associates, LLC,a supply chain planning software and consulting business(www.psjplanner.com).Lean Supply Chain and Logistics Management providesexplanations of both basic and advanced Lean tools, as we as specific Lean implementation opportunities. Real-world examples and case studies demonstrate how to effectively use this powerful strategy to realize significant, long term improvements and bottom-line- savings. This practical guide reveals how to identify and eliminate waste in any organizations supply chain and logistic function. Paul is a leading supply chain and logistics management expert with consulting, teaching, training and industry experience.He combined all aspects of Lean - Lean tools, methodologies,keys to success, and provides complete coverage of all functionalareas of supply chain and logistics management, to enable thereader not only to begin the Lean SCM journey but sustain it intothe future, where the ultimate rewards of increasedcompetitiveness and profitability are attained.Paul developed the Lean Supply Chain & Logistics Simulation forEnna. Teaching Lean Supply Chain thru Simulation Copyright Business901
  • 3. Business901 Podcast TranscriptionImplementing Lean Marketing Systems Transcription of PodcastJoe Dager: Welcome everyone. This is Joe Dager the host ofBusiness 901 Podcast. With me today is Paul Myerson. Paul is thefounder and CEO of Logistics Planning Associates; author of therecent book Lean Supply Chain and Logistics Management. Inconjunction with the consulting services he offers PSI, Plannerand Supply Chaining Software, which is targeted to small andmidsized organizations and is in use throughout the world. Earlylast year Enna released their new Supply Chain LogisticsManagement Training Package and this in addition to previouslyreleased Lean Supply Chain Logistic Management SimulationGame, both in which are available for purchase at their website.Paul was instrumental in developing both packages. I would liketo welcome you Paul. Could you clean that up a bit and tell mehow all these different elements fit together?Paul Myerson: Sure Joe. Thanks for having me today. Ive beenin the supply chain and logistics area for 30 years now;undergraduate, graduate degree in it. Ive worked for many largecompanies; General Electric, Unilever. Along the way, I got intoconsulting, and I basically saw a supply-chain planning systemthat the Windows based application; inexpensive, easy toimplement and use. Thats where I came up with the PSI Plannerback in the late 90s.During that time, as I said, I did a lot of consulting, and thatsoftware package really is to help a company, small, medium-sized manufacturer; distributor go from more of a push to a pullsystem using this type of technology; better forecasting, bettercollaborative forecasting, and the distribution requirementsplanning to help forecast closer to the customer level in yourdistribution network.I also around this time started doing a lot of Lean manufacturingtraining and consulting and that branched into as they call it Teaching Lean Supply Chain thru Simulation Copyright Business901
  • 4. Business901 Podcast TranscriptionImplementing Lean Marketing Systemstoday or what I refer to it as Lean Enterprise because it startedexpanding if you recall. It started in manufacturing, mainly inrepetitive manufacturing like the auto industry and expanded intoother industries and to the office, in the last five or so years intothe supply chain and logistics area.I always differentiate I call it supply chain and logistics becausesome people consider supply changes purchasing andprocurement, and I include the aspect of transportation,distribution, planning, scheduling, etc.As I did a lot of training in Lean, I used several simulationtraining games to teach people some of the concepts of Lean andhow to apply it to manufacture. I realized that there was a realhole or gap there in Supply Chain and Logistics Management.Thats where I came up with the idea for coming up with asimulation game with a training package and that also eventuallylead to my book on Supply Chain and Logistics Management.Joe: Whats the difference between the training package and thesimulation package?Paul: The company that I wrote this with, the publisher Enna,enna.com, basically that was the way they work. Its a two-pronged approach. They basically sell them separately. Somepeople just want to do training. In other words, as a consultant oran in-house trainer, you want to teach people on concepts andwhat are Lean concepts and how do you apply them to theworkplace? Thats all well and good but if you want to take it tothe next level I find it helpful to have a simulation game sopeople can actually translate what theyre learning in a classroomand apply it in real life or at least close to real life.So theyre two separate things, but some people prefer just doingthe training then going out on the work floor. Other people preferto start off the training with a simulation game. Teaching Lean Supply Chain thru Simulation Copyright Business901
  • 5. Business901 Podcast TranscriptionImplementing Lean Marketing SystemsJoe: You can either use one or both together then?Paul: Right, right. If you were to purchase from Enna thesimulation game, it comes with basically the training packageintegrated in it. However, its less expensive just to buy thetraining package which basically has slides and training conceptsand tools in it without the simulation game. The game is actuallya physical game that you purchase. Theyre also coming out withother training packages like I believe this June they are going tohave a Lean Supply Chain for 5S Workplace Organization. Thefirst one they came out with was a general overview of LeanSupply Chain and Logistics Training Package.Joe: Now, do you use this simulation package yourself in yourinstruction?Paul: I have used it. It really depends on the situation. If I havea client that is doing Lean, were looking at a training event forteaching Lean Supply Chain in the appropriate company or theappropriate environment. I do use it. I have used it. Othercompanies, if its more of a manufacturer, and they want ageneral training for manufacturing, then Ill use others. There area lot of other training packages that are geared more towardmanufacturing. In other words, were looking at changeovers,equipment, and layout, things like that as opposed to more theSupply Chain Logistics that are specific to supply chain such aswarehouse layout and adjusting time and things like that.Joe: When would you use the game for training?Paul: Well, I find it useful whether Im doing Lean Manufacturingfor manufacturing or Lean Office for warehouse or supply chainand logistics. To be truly successful with Lean I think most peoplewould agree that everybody has to be involved and understandthat the concepts and the applications, so you always want to runas many people in your company through some kind of Leantraining. The simulation is appropriate; I think, in the Teaching Lean Supply Chain thru Simulation Copyright Business901
  • 6. Business901 Podcast TranscriptionImplementing Lean Marketing Systemsintroductory types of setups where people they might sit thereand listen, not listen, be bored if youre listening to a lecture. Thisway, it gets them engaged. Its a good team building approach toget them involved and see where it can really benefit them andthe company and what their role in it is. So I find it to be veryuseful.Joe: When you use it in a workshop setting do you use it in theintroduction process or midday after you went through a few Leanprinciples?Paul: Well, its kind of a stand-alone thing. It is basically theintroductory workshop. So my particular simulation game for asupply-chain logistics has three rounds, you can use less thanthree if you want to make it shorter, or you can do it in tworounds. Its typically meant to be a six to an eight-hour eventthat can be done shorter as I said or longer. However, itstypically for 10 to 15 people, probably closer to 10 are better.Again, its kind of the introductory first-day training to get peopleinvolved and a basic understanding.Joe: So youre sitting there using all day long and explaining thedifferent components. Better yet, you explain how you go throughthe workshop with it.Paul: In a nutshell, we have three rounds as I said. What we dois we start off, before we actually play the first round of the gamehave an introduction of Lean, just a concept of the seven ways,the non-value added, value added, all that stuff. We lay out thescenario. Again if the person who purchases the software,therere roles to play, everybody plays a role; supply chainmanager, shipper, customer service, etc. The person doing thetraining or the teaching might be the role of the owner of thecompany or a consultant brought in order to teach Lean.The first round is kind of the as is. Heres the situation, businessruns as usual, kind of the traditional methods of push, in this Teaching Lean Supply Chain thru Simulation Copyright Business901
  • 7. Business901 Podcast TranscriptionImplementing Lean Marketing Systemscase for supply chain pushing orders in waves or in batchesthrough a warehouse for layout, large inventories, etc. at highcosts.After the first round, we do some wrap up and get some peopleinvolved. We say, "OK, heres where we are now lets bring in thisexpert in Lean and talk about where we might apply Lean here."The consultant or owner comes in and talks about some basicfoundation concepts of Lean and where you might apply it indistribution and supply chain.The second round youll implement some basic improvements,not dramatic but basic ones, and youll actually measure the endof each round. Youll measure your profitability; your costs,inventory levels, service levels, and things like that.Then after the second round youll do even more advanceconcepts teaching to the group, and theyll come up with ideas forthe final round, which can be pretty dramatic in terms of usingvendor managed inventory, which is really just in time, dramaticone-piece flow, things like that.By the end of the third round and the wrap up at the enddramatically increase your profitability and service levels. Talkabout steps, what you might do such as value stream mapping toget into detail about the current state and how you mightdramatically change it to a future state in your workplace whereyou might apply some of this stuff once you get out of thisclassroom.Thats, in a nutshell, what the game does. Its not a game boardbut people actually play the roles in the game. There are gamepieces such as Lego blocks to represent inventory and astopwatch, so its actually a complete game. Teaching Lean Supply Chain thru Simulation Copyright Business901
  • 8. Business901 Podcast TranscriptionImplementing Lean Marketing SystemsJoe: Do you keep the same roles that people are in their work?Do you keep the roles in the game or do you have them mix itup?Paul: If this person is an inventory manager, we wouldnt givethem the role of the inventory manager in this game. Its betterto mix it up in terms of what they do in real life. I mean in thiscase they all have the same position in supply chain and logistics,which may be in sales or customer service. But the idea is not toput them in the role that they normally do, so they can see itfrom outside. But throughout the game, you do typically keep thesame role. If your role is to do order entry, then youll probablydo order entry throughout the game. However, your positionmight be eliminated then you might move to a more value addedposition.Joe: As I hear you explain the game you go through, the keystages of gaming. You start as a newbie in an on boardingprocess and you go to more of a regular player, and then youdevelop it, in the gaming world theyre called an enthusiast butmore of a master level. So youre taking them through threestages in your process?Paul: Yeah. The game itself has 10 participants and there can beobservers and such. As I said different positions like sales, orderprocessing, supply chain manager, order picker, etc. Its a 20minute round. As I said youll actually teach them the conceptthat theyll see the company, the business evolve from a lessefficient business to a more efficient and profitable business overeach 20 minute round. As you said, the first round is kind of theas is or current state. The second or third round is the futurestate.And they actually not only get to map it or think about it, theyactually get to do it and see their results. Its kind of neat, andits a lot of fun. Its good for team building. They work together. Teaching Lean Supply Chain thru Simulation Copyright Business901
  • 9. Business901 Podcast TranscriptionImplementing Lean Marketing SystemsWhen you do this kind of training it is such is the concept you doas a wrap up if youre a good consultant or trainer you do say,"Does any of this stuff ring true to you? Here is the currentprocess, were losing money, theres too much inventory. Dothese things ring true to you? Do you see them?"During each round as you make improvements, could have youdone this with the problems that you mentioned? Do you knowwhat I mean? Thats how you relate it to the real world, to thepeople in the training.Joe: Do you see players engaging right away or do you have tokind of prompt them? How do you get them warmed up and intothe game?Paul: Well, a lot of that you can only do so much with the gameitself and the slides. A lot of it comes from the enthusiasm. Thegroup itself being enthusiastic, the person running it whether itsthe consultant or its the trainer has to obviously showenthusiasm. You want to give people breaks. You dont just wantto have them sitting in a room for six, eight hours without breaksand lunch and a chance to stretch and get caught up. Its kind ofboth. The people you bring in have to understand how importantit is but also be able to have some fun and relax.Joe: Do you see any difference in the engagement from agender, age, or a position standpoint at all?Paul: Well, in all games, again not just this game but when Ivedone simulations for Glee Manufacturing, some people come inreally negative, and they dont really believe in this stuff, somepeople know a little. Then some of the people who are the mostnegative might come out of the game the most positive or mightcome up with ideas. I think you have to emphasize to people thatthings are changing these days even more rapidly, and youve gotto go with the flow. Yeah, you might see someone whos beenaround a long time might be resistant to change, but thats not Teaching Lean Supply Chain thru Simulation Copyright Business901
  • 10. Business901 Podcast TranscriptionImplementing Lean Marketing Systemsalways the case. Sometimes its the younger person andsometimes it could be job security or just lack of interest. But Ithink youve got to show them that it can an evolution, not arevolution type of thing, that you can apply bits and pieces ofwhat works for your company, and this is a good way to showthat, because theyre going to actually have the input as to whatcan change over each round.Joe Dager: As lets say a viewer of people participating, do yousee people really getting into the game, joining in the flow of thegame and kind of moving themselves away from reality, or isreality just always there...do you see that creeping back in duringthe game all the time?Myerson: Well, during the training part before each round, youmight hear some of the negativity or "Well; we cant do that," or"Yeah, if management did that it would work, but they wont dothat," things like that. During the game itself, the actual round,its usually people kind of let go and have fun, and when I playthe role of the consultant and/or the owner, I try to make itrealistic and joke around, like, "You could be fired;" and "Lets getgoing," and "Work harder and smarter." So, you make it kind ofentertaining and fun. Ive been in some of these simulationswhere the guys coming in playing the owners role, theyll have acigar...you know theyll really get into the character themselves,and that helps to get the people involved, and then they kind oftease each other, and we have a lot of fun.Dager: Well, its kind of like a murder-mystery dinner orsomething, right?Myerson: Yeah, and thats why its important to have the clientbring in a good lunch for people, and snacks.Dager: Are there any rewards as part of the game structure, oris it just the competitiveness of the results of the improvementthats there? Teaching Lean Supply Chain thru Simulation Copyright Business901
  • 11. Business901 Podcast TranscriptionImplementing Lean Marketing SystemsMyerson: There are no specific rewards. Its really...again; Ivebeen in some simulation games where everybody makes aclock -- this was for Lee Manufacturing -- and at the end, theyget to keep the clock. Its a cheap clock, but I dont thinkpeople...you know, thats a nice thing. Some companies will giveyou training certificates. If you do this through a certified trainer,you might be able to get things like Continuing Education units orcertifications -- you know, little plaque-type things -- but the bigthing is, at the end of each round, theres a spreadsheet thatcomes with it where the trainer...actually, the warehousemanager, I believe...will actually track the improvements. Youreactually gathering data from each round; how much was shipped,what the inventory levels were, and things like that. At the end ofeach round, youll be able to determine profitability, salesrevenue, and all those things. So, it becomes kind of fun, and Idont want to say its rigged, but if you run this correctly, allthese simulation games by the second or third round or howevermany rounds you have...its a fairly dramatic improvement fromusually having a loss, not a profit, to then, at the end, havingfairly significantly profits and increases in sales. So, thats areward in itself, I think.Dager: Do you think you could have accomplished the sameoutcomes or learning without a game?Myerson: I do a lot of teaching myself. Im an adjunct professorat several universities; I learned a long time ago when I tookclasses in giving presentations that people learn in different ways.Some people are visual; they learn through seeing; other peopleare more auditory; they learn better through hearing; and somepeople are more hands-on, - on; they learn through touching.And so, typically, youre dealing with people that are out there...itdepends if youre dealing with more office people versus peoplewho are out on the floor that are more hands on...that peoplegenerally need a combination of all these things. So I might Teaching Lean Supply Chain thru Simulation Copyright Business901
  • 12. Business901 Podcast TranscriptionImplementing Lean Marketing Systemsactually mix some video, when I do training in a classroom foruniversity.I think that reinforces any concepts. Thats why we do it inrounds, start off with some simple training, and they get a littlemore detailed and complex and actually implement this stuff inthe game.Dager: Can you use the game repetitively? Get deeper meaningout of it, besides just these initial three rounds?Myerson: Well, its not designed that way. As I said, this isreally more an overview to get people started on many of theconcepts, but like any introduction to Lean, whether itsmanufacturing or supply chain, youre covering so manyconcepts, and so youre touching on adjustment time, layout,visual workplace, all that stuff, so that, typically the nextstep -- and we have this in the next step at the end of thisgame -- is to talk about, well, maybe you want to go do avalue-stream app for a specific process. Maybe you want to lookat the picking process in your warehouse, or the entire process inyour warehouse, or the order of your offices managementprocess. And then, youll come up with specific opportunities,where youll then want to look at how youre getting down to onepiece slow or quick change-over, maybe. Its what they call "TotalProductive Maintenance: Equipment Related Waste", where youhave to look at equipment and how its maintained, and thattakes more specific training, its a little more technical, and itsvery focused. So I would say the answer is no, it is what it is, butit leads you to those next steps with more complex training.Dager: Why do you think the interest in kind of "gaming up"learning has happened lately? Why do you think that theres astronger interest in that in most workshops, even?Myerson: Well, I think, obviously; it must be working or therewouldnt be the increased requests or the demand for it. I think it Teaching Lean Supply Chain thru Simulation Copyright Business901
  • 13. Business901 Podcast TranscriptionImplementing Lean Marketing Systemsdefinitely works. It gets better results; people tend to enjoy it.Typically, after any kind of training, people fill out evaluationforms; I think they tend to get better evaluations when they dothis type of stuff. Also, probably just that simulation in generalhas been used for training and improving processes for a longtime. Probably, also, its just a technical age when people areused to gaming -- even though this is not an online game -- but,you know, a lot of younger people these days basically do gamingand simulations on computers, and it feeds to that, even thoughits not a video game, but I guess theyre used to this type ofthings, playing different roles with different people, so theyrekind of comfortable in that.Dager: Whats your overall perspective on gaming simulation?Would you really recommend always having some type ofstructured activity within a workshop?Myerson: Well, if its a general workshop, I would say yes. Atthe very least, if I dont do a simulation game, I at least try andget some videos in there. Some people like to learn visually, butits also so they get to see how this stuff gets implemented in aworkplace -- any workplace -- but a real workplace. So, I thinkthat helps learning. If you can get the simulation involved, thatsgood too. As you get into...as I said, other training and consultingwhere youre getting into specifics, lets say, TPM -- TotalProductive Maintenance -- youre going to actually be out thereobserving real equipment. Now, I also integrate specific...notsimulations, but videos for that, showing how people in a realcompany went through that particular event, in this case a TPMevent, or if its a quick change-over, heres how they actually didit, so its not a simulation, people actually get to see how itworked in real life.Dager: Now, when you use these different games that you havethere, does that help, using your software? Is that an extension Teaching Lean Supply Chain thru Simulation Copyright Business901
  • 14. Business901 Podcast TranscriptionImplementing Lean Marketing Systemsof...you know, do you understand the software better, or thepracticality of the software better?Myerson: I dont want to say theyre not related, but our supplychain planning software...I guess was doing some Lean supplychain and logistics training, and they saw how you go from pushto pull, then you can relate that to my software, which is supplychain planning software which helps a company in real-life gofrom a push to pull environment. Now, there are othertechnologies as well that we dont sell; weve bartered with othercompanies like Warehouse Management Software, which wouldhelp you to flow better within your warehouse. So, I suppose inthat way, you could link it together, but generally, theyre kind ofseparate.Dager: Could you explain what your software is, and a littlemore about it?Myerson: Its called PSI Planner for Windows. As I mentioned,Ive used a lot of different technical software from some of theselarger companies, like Manugistics and Logility and etc. Theyrevery complex, very expensive, like hundreds of thousands ofdollars and you had to be a rocket scientist to understand...weeks or months of training. Our system is relatively simple.Its for a small to medium sized manufacturer or distributor ofproducts, or a company that imports products and slaps theirname on it, even. Its especially useful for companies that haveregional networks of distribution centers or warehouses.Basically, it helps companies to forecast demand, "What am Igoing to sell?" It uses a collaborativeApproach -- we call it the "Pyramid Approach," which has beenaround since the 1980s -- where you can generate forecasts atdetailed levels, but then aggregate them to higher levels. So youmight generate your forecast at the SKU item location; you mighthave one item at ten warehouses, and you want to forecast at the Teaching Lean Supply Chain thru Simulation Copyright Business901
  • 15. Business901 Podcast TranscriptionImplementing Lean Marketing Systemslevel so that youre closer to the customer, and ultimately; youmight even want to forecast at the customer warehouse location.Thats a whole process in itself called CP4 -- CollaborativePlanning Forecast and Replenishment -- which our software canbe used for.Basically, the forecast gets generated at a detailed level. You canmake management overrides; you can use various simple, easyto understand statistical methods. Then, you can aggregate it up,because maybe sales and finance really want to look at forecastsand by class of products and sales dollars, not in cases and bywarehouse. So, you collaborate and share that information, youultimately come up with a forecast youre comfortable with, goingup to, in our case, 36 months in daily, weekly, and monthlybuckets.Then, we have whats called Distribution RequirementsPlanning -- DRP -- its similar to MRP in your distribution network.So, you do this time-phased planning, where you take thisforecast in time-buckets, like, lets say, weekly buckets, and youlook and say, "Whats my inventory in my warehouse, less thegreater of my forecasts for open customer orders, plus anyscheduled receipts, transfers, purchase orders, scheduledproduction coming in," and it creates your projected endinginventory in the future.The idea of DRP is it says, "OK, I dont ever want to run out ofproduct; I want to keep some safety stock or safety-time level ofbuffer inventory, and in a month or two from now, when Imgoing to drop below that, based on this forecast, it tells you. Itcreates what are called Planned Receipts and Orders. PlannedReceipts says when I need to receive more product at thatwarehouse, and Planned Orders backs you up the lead time -- thetransportation lead time, the manufacturing lead time, etc. -- andits hierarchical, so you can go through a distribution network. Teaching Lean Supply Chain thru Simulation Copyright Business901
  • 16. Business901 Podcast TranscriptionImplementing Lean Marketing SystemsYou might have regional warehouses that are sourced from acentral warehouse that are sourced from a manufacturer, andwork your way up that supply chain, and tell me what myultimate requirements are for my manufacturing, and explodethat into raw components using MRP, which we have to tell mymanufacturers what we need to make my suppliers. So it goesfrom pushing out and guessing, to get closer to the customer touse that demand to pull through your requirements. So, thatsthe application, PSI Planner. That actually stands for ProductionSales Inventory Planner; thats not a term I made up, thatsactually a term thats used in supply chain planning.Dager: So, whats next for you, Paul? I mean, youre a softwaredeveloper; youre a game developer, an author; youre aconsultant. Is that going to keep you busy enough?Myerson: I hope so. You know, as I said, I also have regulargigs teaching at a couple of universities here in New Jersey, butIm always looking for opportunities. I also have a new column inInbound Logistics Magazine, and, potentially, Im told Im goingto get a web blog for Industry Week Magazine. But, I feel that Imsomewhat of a thought leader by doing all these different things,and so Im always looking for opportunities to help companiesand businesses, so Im continuing to build on that, in terms oftraining and consulting. The software...we come out with newversions every year; we make enhancements to improve it, and Ienjoy doing all these things.Dager: Where can someone contact you?Myerson: Our website is www.psiplanner.com. Our phonenumber is (1-800) 472-0233. You can always email me atpaul@psiplanner.com.Dager: Your book name again, and where that can be found? Teaching Lean Supply Chain thru Simulation Copyright Business901
  • 17. Business901 Podcast TranscriptionImplementing Lean Marketing SystemsMyerson: Yep, its from McGraw Hill Professional; its called"Lean Supply Chain and Logistics Management," and you can justgo on Amazon.com; you can type in Myerson and Lean, and itllcome up.Dager: Well, Id like to thank you very much, Paul. I appreciateyour input. This podcast is available through the business901.comwebsite and the Business901 iTunes store.Myerson: Thanks, Joe, I enjoyed it. Teaching Lean Supply Chain thru Simulation Copyright Business901
  • 18. Business901 Podcast TranscriptionImplementing Lean Marketing Systems Joseph T. Dager Business901 Phone: 260-918-0438 Skype: Biz901 Fax: 260-818-2022 Email: jtdager@business901.com Website: http://www.business901.com Twitter: @business901Joe Dager is president of Business901, a firm specializing inbringing the continuous improvement process to the sales andmarketing arena. He takes his process thinking of over thirtyyears in marketing within a wide variety of industries and appliesit through Lean Marketing and Lean Service Design.Visit the Lean Marketing Lab: Being part of this community willallow you to interact with like-minded individuals andorganizations, purchase related tools, use some free ones andreceive feedback from your peers. Marketing with Lean Book Series included in membership Lean Sales and Marketing Workshop Lean Service Design Workshop Teaching Lean Supply Chain thru Simulation Copyright Business901

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