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There is a presentation utilizing this slide deck available in the training section at Business901.com. Sales and marketing can no longer operate in a vacuum. It has become a process output that ...

There is a presentation utilizing this slide deck available in the training section at Business901.com. Sales and marketing can no longer operate in a vacuum. It has become a process output that intertwines across many of the departments within the organization. As companies have become flat, their decision making is increasingly being done by committee. As a supplier, you must mimic your customer decision-making path and as a result your sales and marketing will also be done by committee.

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Lean Sales and Marketing Engagement Presentation Transcript

  • 1. The Lean Sales and Marketing Canvas For EDCA, PDCA, SDCA Lean Engagement Team The Collaborative Cycle of Sales and Marketing
  • 2. Will Lean ever be sustained unless sales and marketing are on board? Why start with production if we want to look from the customer’s eyes? Would it be not be more correct if we did Lean sales and marketing first? Why can’t we have Quality in Sales and Marketing? SETTING THE STAGE
  • 3. With few exceptions, every time Lean is introduced to sales and marketing, it was through Value Stream Mapping with the sole purpose of removing waste in the process. They were told what that data meant and as a result what they should stop doing. This resulted in neither an increase in sales nor an increase in value added time with the customer. Salespeople had every right to scream and ignore the conversation. All they were ever told to do was gather data. SETTING THE STAGE(cont.)
  • 4. Lean Engagement Team Value Stream Manager Team Coordinator Sales Team Marketing Communication
  • 5. The implementation and deployment of Lean Sales and Marketing teams must include a clear definition of roles and matching needed talent to each team. Every organization will deploy differently, there is no cookie cutter approach. Roles are an important part of this process and the more definition provided the more effective the individual Teams will be. Organizations that consider these alignments as an integral part of their sales and marketing strategy create strategic advantages over the competition..
  • 6. The Team Coordinator (TC) maintains the integrity of the processes through coaching and predefined control po Transaction to teams Obtainable goal setting. Willingness to train people. Commitment to measurement Understanding and agreement on the need for processes. Dedication to knowledge capture & sharing internally & externally. Clear-cut business and/or divisional strategy and objectives.
  • 7. Successful Lean teams are iTeams Teamwork is an individual not group skill Individuals must take responsibility for… • the quality and productivity of each team • relationships they are part of • individual accountability • the larger, shared tasks or deliverables
  • 8. Customer Experience will mimic your Employee Experience • Know your team, design for personal & social needs • Build fun/pleasure/satisfaction into activities • Design cycles based on desired customer experience • Embrace motivators like power, autonomy & belonging
  • 9. The Value Stream Manager (VSM) represents the product/service markets and the business. Team Coordinator (TC) maintains the integrity of the processes through coaching and predefined control points. The Sales and Marketing Team (Team) is a cross- functional group whose number and expertise are derived from the decision-making path of the customer. This Team does the actual sales, providing content, technical functions, trials, testing, etc. The Team Coordinator (TC) maintains the integrity of the processes through coaching and predefined control po Overview:
  • 10. Identify specific products/markets that offer organization best options for growth. Create a value model for each of targeted product or market. Clearly state the organization’s competitive value proposition. Identify the direction needed to enhance that value proposition. Monitor competitive value proposition. Value Stream Manager
  • 11. Facilitating the team’s progress toward their goal Ensuring that work being delivered is in tune w/ customer’s needs. Mentoring the team on Lean processes . Acting as a buffer for outside interruptions. Team Coordinator
  • 12. First consider the kind of team needed: • Creativity (EDCA) • Problem Resolution (PDCA) • Tactical execution (SDCA) Teams Once you've established the objectives, you choose a team structure to match it. Without this process you may have creative teams working on tactical execution or on the other hand a problem-solving team working on a creative solution.
  • 13. Marketing Communications Ezine Mailers Brochure Pricing Web Presence Social Media Press Release Speaking Advertising Referral Handles the marketing communications for the company. Works closely with Value Stream Managers & Team Coordinators Provide support for program strategy and value stream.
  • 14. Identify specific products/markets that offer organization best options for growth. Create a value model for each of targeted product or market. Clearly state the organization’s competitive value proposition. Identify the direction needed to enhance that value proposition. Monitor competitive value proposition. Value Stream Manager
  • 15. The canvas when completed serves as a guide for the sales and marketing team. It provides the clarity and empowers the team.
  • 16. There should be a canvas created for every value stream and sometimes for every Sales and Marketing team.
  • 17. You can have as many pillars(channels) as needed. Simple Value Streams only have one channel, one canvas. Others may have a canvas for each channel or customer segment.
  • 18. This entire value stream could be managed by one value stream team or it could be passed to another value stream team that manages only that cycle. The sales and marketing team is a cross-functional group whose number and expertise are derived from the decision-making path of the customer. The team is first and foremost the listening post for the customer (prospect), providing the customer with the information, technology, and support that is required. This is done through a EDCA/PDCA/SDCA cycles that depending on the complexity may constitute an entire sales cycle or just a certain portion of the customer’s decision-making process.
  • 19. Facilitating the team’s progress toward their goal Ensuring that work being delivered is in tune w/ customer’s needs. Mentoring the team on Lean processes . Acting as a buffer for outside interruptions. Team Coordinator
  • 20. Marketing Communications Ezine Mailers Brochure Pricing Web Presence Social Media Press Release Speaking Advertising Referral Handles the marketing communications for the company. Works closely with Value Stream Managers & Team Coordinators Provide support for program strategy and value stream.
  • 21. First consider the kind of team needed: • Creativity (EDCA) • Problem Resolution (PDCA) • Tactical execution (SDCA) Teams Once you've established the objectives, you choose a team structure to match it. Without this process you may have creative teams working on tactical execution or on the other hand a problem-solving team working on a creative solution.
  • 22. SALES EDCA/PDCA/SDCA The SALES part of the framework is where the sales team gets its directions and coaching from the team coordinator and value stream manager. Within the actual cycles the sales team is empowered to make their own choices and determine their own direction to accomplish the goals of that cycle. One of the key considerations in developing a team is to determine the objective of the cycle. Is it primarily creativity, problem-resolution, or tactical execution?
  • 23. As the customer/prospect travels through their decision-making process our marketing efforts are implemented in spirals of increasing knowledge of their process that converge on the ultimate goal, the correct solution for the customer. The spiral gets tighter as we progress. I like to think of it as an increase in cadence. Passing through from one spiral to the next is a result of the customer or, better put, the result of our increase in knowledge about the customers’ problem and the match of our proposed solution. This handoff from one cycle to another is typically managed through a control point.
  • 24. Standard Work for the Lean Engagement Team The Collaborative Cycle of Sales and Marketing
  • 25. EDCA PDCA SDCA How important is Standard Work? Standard Work puts the food on the table!
  • 26. • Clarity on What to do • Commitment on When to do it • Translation from Goals to Actions, the Why • Enablement of the actions, How • Accountability thru establishing the Who • Line of sight on Where your circle of influence effects Standard Work provides discipline thru
  • 27. Standard Work in 1 word Execution
  • 28. SALES SDCA SDCA documents the current best practice and provides the foundation for all continuous improvement. It provides the structure for daily accountability and the prescribed performance to a standard. Part of Standard Work is the visual forms that provide the line of sight between team members, teams, leaders and coordinators. One of the key considerations in developing a team is to determine the objective of the cycle. In SDCA, we structure for tactical execution. Do CheckAct Standard Select the Team Goals of the Project Empower the Team Locate the people who will be on the team Agree on the method State the standard
  • 29. Do CheckAct Standard Select the Team Goals of the Project Empower the Team Locate the people who will be on the team Agree on the method State the standard
  • 30. The SALES part of the framework is where the sales team gets its directions and coaching from the team coordinator and value stream manager.
  • 31. S: State the standard • Standard work is the best practice for a given process. • Provide a routine for consistent delivery of work. • Must be stated clearly. • Provide a clear line of sight to the • Value Stream Manager • Team Coordinator • Team Members
  • 32. A: Agree on the method. • Method you are going to use for the documentation of standard work. • Provide necessary components of a reporting system that ensures the work is being done as expected. • Use the practices you are currently doing
  • 33. L: Locate the people who will be on the team. • List the members of your team • Including position and role they will play. Name Position Role
  • 34. E: Empower the Team • Team is autonomous and completely responsible for the tasks within this stage • Clarity is most critical factor for empowering a team • Outline Meetings, Daily Stand-ups, Weekly Tactical, Monthly Strategic and others as needed • Agree on Standard Work
  • 35. S: Select the Team Goals of the Project • Team fully understands the exact goals and outcomes expected for this particular cycle • Team agrees to the exact goals and outcomes expected for this particular cycle • Team accepts responsibilities of outcomes.
  • 36. Within the actual cycle the sales team is empowered to make their own choices and determine their own direction to accomplish the goals of that cycle.
  • 37. P: Standard • Review the method. • Document the actions needed and who will complete each action step. • Clarify the resources needed for each action step. • Decide on what constitutes variation and required action.
  • 38. D: Do the plan • Perform to the standard. • Provide line of sight through Kanban Board, Task Board, Action Planner. • Demonstrate work flow and problems encountered.
  • 39. C: Check (Study) see if improvement was made • Did the plan work? • Collect and analyze data to demonstrate if standard was done. • Determine what changes are needed for improvement.
  • 40. A: Act (Adjust) • Is the standard being completed? • Has Customers’ needs been completed? • If not, reconsider and continue improvement • If it has can customer can be handed off to next stage/cycle, document steps taken.
  • 41. Example of Team Member Standard Work
  • 42. Provides Line of Sight for Team at Daily Standup
  • 43. Team Coordinator/Leader Standard Work
  • 44. Line of Site for resources needed at weekly tactical Can auto-populate or be completed by hand. Easily used as part of the task board in a War Room type environment. Virtual Teams can use something as simple as Google Documents or many other popular software packages. Providing a visual, simple and easily access document is the key.
  • 45. Value Stream Manager Standard Work
  • 46. Line of Site for Goal review at Monthly Strategic
  • 47. SDCA uses the 7 Basic Quality Tools • Cause-and-effect diagram (also called Ishikawa or fishbone chart): Identifies many possible causes for an effect or problem and sorts ideas into useful categories. • Check sheet: A structured, prepared form for collecting and analyzing data; a generic tool that can be adapted for a wide variety of purposes. • Control charts: Graphs used to study how a process changes over time. • Histogram: The most commonly used graph for showing frequency distributions, or how often each different value in a set of data occurs. • Pareto chart: Shows on a bar graph which factors are more significant. • Scatter diagram: Graphs pairs of numerical data, one variable on each axis, to look for a relationship. • Stratification: A technique that separates data gathered from a variety of sources so that patterns can be seen (some lists replace “stratification” with “flowchart” or “run chart”).
  • 48. Frame Problems as Opportunities
  • 49. Always DRAW for • Yourself • Team • Organization • Customers
  • 50. PDCA for the Lean Engagement TeamThe Collaborative Cycle of Sales and Marketing
  • 51. The only competitive advantage you have is the rate at which you learn from your customers. Positioning your organization in your customer’s playground is the most important role marketing has.
  • 52. Marketing with PDCA PDCA = Knowledge Creation • Knowledge is limited at beginning • Key information not known • Feedback to justify hypotheses • Customers changes mind • Each cycle closer to the goal
  • 53. PDCA is a Call to Action Start with a problem that you don’t have the current knowledge to solve. What don’t I understand that I need to learn? What change do I need to see? Close the knowledge gap before closing the performance gap.
  • 54. SALES PDCA PDCA provides feedback to justify our hypotheses and increase our knowledge. This allows both the customer and us not to be perfect the first time. The rate of change or the speed of the improvement is a key competitive factor in today’s world. PDCA allows for major jumps in performance not through massive breakthroughs but through frequent small improvements. One of the key considerations in developing a team is to determine the objective of the cycle. In PDCA, we structure for problem-resolution. Do CheckAct Plan Select the Improvement Empower the Team Locate the people who understand the process Analyze the current process Select the initial Problem Perception
  • 55. Do CheckAct Plan Select the Improvement Empower the Team Locate the people who understand the process Analyze the current process Select the initial Problem Perception
  • 56. The SALES part of the framework is where the sales team gets its directions and coaching from the team coordinator and value stream manager.
  • 57. S: Select the initial Problem Perception • What is the problem to be solved? • Describe the problem, issue or need that your project is intended to address. • Always Predict • Allows actions to be more focused • Ensures that relevant data will be collected. • Enables results to be obtained quicker
  • 58. A: Analyze the current process • Review the Critical to Quality (CTQ) issues facing this value stream and how they apply to this cycle. • What should be involved in this step? • Have customers’ expectations and specifications been examined and documented? • What are the points of concern?
  • 59. L: Locate people who understand the process • List the members of your team • Including position and role they will play. Name Position Role
  • 60. E: Empower the Team • Team is autonomous and completely responsible for the tasks within this stage • Clarity is most critical factor for empowering a team • Why are we doing this project? Is it clear to all participants? • What are we going to do? How will it be measured? • Who is responsible for each task? Who does it involve? • How must it be accomplished? How do we review? • Where will it take place? Where can the data be found? • When must it be complete? • Outline Meetings, Daily Stand-ups, Weekly Tactical, Monthly Strategic and others
  • 61. S: Select the Improvement • Define the Gap that is to be completed in this cycle • Team agrees to the goals and outcomes expected for this particular cycle • Team accepts responsibilities of outcomes.
  • 62. Within the actual cycle the sales team is empowered to make their own choices and determine their own direction to accomplish the goals of that cycle. Plan is 50% of effort
  • 63. P: Plan • What are the detailed steps you will take to make an improvement? • Clarify the problem, breaking down customer decision process and people involve. • Locate the point of concern or cause through Who, What, Where, When • Identify root cause and verify with data. • Develop countermeasures utilizing user stories and place on task board, prioritize.
  • 64. D: Do the plan • Build Project Plan or iteration through user stories • Provide line of sight through Kanban Board, Task Board, Action Planner. • Demonstrate work flow and problems encountered. • Use daily stand-ups or Andon to signify problems or hang-ups.
  • 65. C: Check (Study) see if improvement was made • Did the plan work? Study the results • Collect and analyze data to demonstrate if gap was closed • Determine what changes worked and which ones did not
  • 66. A: Act (Adjust) • Has the gap been closed? • Has customers’ needs been completed? • If not, reconsider and continue improvement • If it has can customer can be handed off to next stage/cycle, document steps taken. • Can action be turned into standard work?
  • 67. Example of Team Member Standard Work
  • 68. Provides Line of Sight for Team at Daily Standup
  • 69. Team Coordinator/Leader Standard Work
  • 70. Line of Site for resources needed at weekly tactical Can auto-populate or be completed by hand. Easily used as part of the task board in a War Room type environment. Virtual Teams can use something as simple as Google Documents or many other popular software packages. Providing a visual, simple and easily access document is the key.
  • 71. Value Stream Manager Standard Work
  • 72. Line of Site for Goal review at Monthly Strategic
  • 73. PDCA uses 7 Basic Tools • Affinity diagram: organizes a large number of ideas into their natural relationships. • Relations diagram: shows cause-and-effect relationships and helps you analyze the natural links between different aspects of a complex situation. • Tree diagram: breaks down broad categories into finer and finer levels of detail, helping you move your thinking step by step from generalities to specifics. • Matrix diagram: shows the relationship between groups of information and can give information about the relationship, strengths, the roles played or measurements. • Matrix data analysis: a complex mathematical technique for analyzing matrices, often replaced in this list by the similar prioritization matrix. • Arrow diagram: shows the required order of tasks in a project or process, the best schedule for the entire project, and potential scheduling, problems and solutions. • Process decision program chart (PDPC): systematically identifies what might go wrong in a plan under development.
  • 74. What is your iCustomer Level? The iCustomer level is not a tangible number. It is strictly based on the degree of interaction your organization needs based on the products/services it is delivering.
  • 75. PDCA is the Culture of Lean Solve one thing and prove one thing Solve one thing and prove one thing Solve one thing and prove one thing Solve one thing and prove one thing Solve one thing and prove one thing Solve one thing and prove one thing Solve one thing and prove one thing Solve one thing and prove one thing Solve one thing and prove one thing Solve one thing and prove one thing Solve one thing and prove one thing Solve one thing and prove one thing “Lean is not a revolution; it is solve one thing and prove one thing.” - Dr. Michael Balle
  • 76. EDCA for the Lean Engagement Team Book Coming Soon! The Collaborative Cycle of Sales and Marketing
  • 77. Explore thru Pull Access • Not about “Stocks of Knowledge” versus “Flow of Knowledge.” Attract • Being part of customer conversations. Achieve • Supported by a broad collection of people and resources which you can pull from.
  • 78. Create Pull - Access Value – in – Use Service and Products are a means to an end Value Co-Creation Not for customers rather with customers Trust Real value with all stakeholders
  • 79. Explore when Problem is unknown EDCA = • What is? • What If? • What Wows? • What Works?
  • 80. EDCA is a Journey in the Customer’s Playground
  • 81. EDCA is closely related to Service Design Thinking Stage 1: Exploration Stage 3: Reflection Stage 2: Creation Stage 4: Implementation
  • 82. SALES EDCA Marketing in highly competitive markets is about exploring new propositions and innovation in the users domain . The environment determines where to start and complex marketing environments need EDCA. Within the actual EDCA cycle the sales team is empowered to make their own choices and determine their own direction to accomplish the goals of that cycle. One of the key considerations in developing a team is to determine the objective of the cycle. In EDCA, we structure for innovation and creativity. Do CheckAct Explore Select a limited set of needs you are designing for Empower the Team Locate the people who understand the user and the needs Analyze the user Sense-making: Give meaning to experience.
  • 83. Do CheckAct Explore Select a limited set of needs you are designing for Empower the Team Locate the people who understand the user and the needs Analyze the user Sense-making: Give meaning to experience.
  • 84. The SALES part of the framework is where the sales team gets its directions and coaching from the team coordinator and value stream manager.
  • 85. S: Sense-making: Give meaning to experience • Create a point of view statement that defines the efforts to understand connections which can be among people, places, and events. • Understanding the problem space is many times as important as understanding the user.
  • 86. A: Analyze the user • Define and study the user to develop insights as a starting point for defining value. • Review and focus on the service period to determine the pre-service, service and post service durations. • What are the points of concern?
  • 87. L: Locate people who understand the process • List the members of your team • Including position and role they will play. Name Position Role
  • 88. E: Empower the Team • Team is autonomous and completely responsible for the tasks within this stage • Clarity is most critical factor for empowering a team • Why are we doing this project? Is it clear to all participants? • What are we going to do? How will it be measured? • Who is responsible for each task? Who does it involve? • How must is to be accomplished? How do we review? • Where will it take place? Where can the data be found? • When must it be complete? • Outline Meetings, Daily Stand-ups, Weekly Tactical, Monthly Strategic and others
  • 89. S: Select a limited set of needs you are designing for the user. • Create user stories based on this set of needs. • Team agrees to the goals and outcomes expected for this particular cycle • Team accepts responsibilities of outcomes.
  • 90. Within the actual cycle the sales team is empowered to make their own choices and determine their own direction to accomplish the goals of that cycle.
  • 91. E: Explore • Observe, Think and Feel: Planning is not done in isolation. Visit customers, go to Gemba for planning. • Visualization: use imagery to envision possible future conditions • Journey Mapping: assess existing experience through the customer’s eyes • Value Chain Analysis: assess the current value chain that supports the customer’s journey
  • 92. D: Do the plan • Act and Engage: look and generate new alternatives to the existing business model • Mind Mapping & Brainstorming: generate insights from exploration activities and use those to create design criteria • Concept Development: assemble innovative elements into a coherent alternative solution that can be explored and evaluated
  • 93. C: Check (Study) see if improvement was made • Analyze and optimize: isolating and testing the key assumptions that will drive success or failure of a concept • Rapid Prototyping: express a new concept in a tangible form for exploration, testing, and refinement • Customer Co-Creation: enroll customers to participate in creating solution that best meets their needs
  • 94. A: Act (Adjust) • Relate and Influence: No matter how good of a idea you have, the key is still in gaining acceptance of others, build constituency . • Has exploratory needs been completed? If not, reconsider. • Can we improve through a Learning Launch (PDCA) • Create an affordable experiment • Let UX the new solution over an extended period • Test key assumptions with market data. • Document the steps to complete hand off.
  • 95. Example of Team Member Standard Work
  • 96. Provides Line of Sight for Team at Daily Standup
  • 97. Team Coordinator/Leader Standard Work
  • 98. Line of Site for resources needed at weekly tactical Can auto-populate or be completed by hand. Easily used as part of the task board in a War Room type environment. Virtual Teams can use something as simple as Google Documents or many other popular software packages. Providing a visual, simple and easily access document is the key.
  • 99. Value Stream Manager Standard Work
  • 100. Line of Site for Goal review at Monthly Strategic
  • 101. EDCA uses 10 Basic Tools • Visualization: using imagery to envision possible future conditions • Journey Mapping: assessing the existing experience through the customer’s eyes • Value Chain Analysis: the current value chain that supports the customer’s journey • Mind Mapping: generating insights from exploration activities • Brainstorming: generating new alternatives to the existing business model • Concept Development: assembling innovative elements that can be explored • Assumption Testing: isolating and testing the key assumptions that will drive success or failure of a concept • Rapid Prototyping: expressing a new concept in a tangible form for exploration, testing, and refinement • Customer Co-Creation: enrolling customers to participate in creating the solution • Learning Launch: creating an affordable experiment that lets customers experience the new solution over an extended period of time, so you can test key assumptions
  • 102. The Toolset utilized and the diagram is from the book Designing for Growth
  • 103. 7Cs of Co-Creation Source: McColl-Kennedy 1. Co-operate (compliance) 2. Collate (sorting, assorting, synthesising) 3. Combine complementary skills, knowledge, expertise 4. Connect eg with family, friends, service providers, support groups 5. Co-learning 6. Co-produce(self service, co-design, new service development) 7. Cerebral activities (eg positive thinking, reframing, emotional regulation) When you think about co-creation you jump to innovation. There are other parts to co- creation and how you co-create depends on the level of trust you have with customers.
  • 104. Resources Books: This is Service Design Thinking: Basics - Tools - Cases The Power of Pull: How Small Moves, Smartly Made, Can Set Big Things in Motion Business Model Generation: A Handbook for Visionaries, Game Changers, and Challengers Designing for Growth: A Design Thinking Toolkit for Managers Making Ideas Happen: Overcoming the Obstacles Between Vision and Reality Get Clients Now!(TM): A 28-Day Marketing Program for Professionals, Consultants, and Coaches Lean Thinking: Banish Waste and Create Wealth in Your Corporation, Revised and Updated Websites: Janet R. McColl-Kennedy: Co-creation of Value and S-D logic
  • 105. Leader Standard Work
  • 106. 4 Principle Elements of a Lean Management System 1. Leader Standard Work 2. Visual Controls 3. Daily Accountability Process 4. Leadership Discipline
  • 107. Process Focus Leader Std. Work Visual Controls Daily Accountability Leadership Discipline
  • 108. Creating a Lean Culture Tools to Sustain Lean Conversions by David Mann Leader Management System
  • 109. Leadership Discipline FuelVisual Controls Transmission
  • 110. Leader Standard Work 4 Benefits of Leader Standard Work 1. Translates vague Lean principles into unambiguous performance evaluation criteria 2. Repeatable systems 3. Continuity of best practices 4. Enables average person to consistently deliver above average results
  • 111. Translates vague Lean principles into unambiguous performance evaluation criteria 1. Clearly stated recipe (Standards for expected behaviors) 2. Focused on "doing it," rather than "getting it" 3. Raises questions quickly to back up words with actions 4. Solid Starting Point 5. Cumulates to date actions of best practices
  • 112. Repeatable systems to focus on both: 1. Results 2. The Process that yields results 1. (Difference from MBO – just meet numbers) 2. More Coaching
  • 113. Continuity of best practices 1. Things should continue to operate much as they have, - no "new sheriff in town" 2. Process dependent, not person dependent. 3. Core tasks and Routines are explicitly called out. 4. Minimizes variability 5. Reduces ambiguity 6. Sets conditions under which an individual leader's success is more likely.
  • 114. Enables average person to consistently deliver 1. Leader Standard Work as Interlocking Layers with a degree of redundancy built in, linking the layers. 1. The team leaders' standard work specifies this task. 2. The supervisor's standard work calls for spot-checking and daily meetings 3. The VSM's standard work calls for initialing the value stream once a day 2. Follow-up action items posts to a visual daily task accountability board for review the next day. 3. Prompted by the specific requirements in leaders" standard work from value stream manager to team leader.
  • 115. Enables average person to consistently deliver 1. Daily direction 2. Focus on process 3. Simple Step-by-Step routine.
  • 116. Visual Controls 1. Represent lean's emphasis on process. 2. Timely maintenance of visuals provides physical evidence of leaders' discipline. 3. The visuals with their process data are brought to a standard, often daily accountability meeting. 4. Circularity is good, it is designed to be – represents a closed loop
  • 117. Daily Accountability Process 1. Provides the steering wheel: Task assignments for which improvements will be worked on. 2. Provides the throttle, or the due date and resources for the improvement task. 3. Reinforce the lean management system's focus on process 4. Weekly accountability sessions can also be used.
  • 118. Line of Sight Know what your Team Members are doing • Daily Standups • Weekly Tactical • Monthly Strategic • Quarterly Strategic
  • 119. Not to Difficult 1. Leader Standard Work 2. Visual Controls 3. Daily Accountability Process 4. Leadership Discipline
  • 120. Leadership Discipline 1. Behavior is more important than charisma 2. Execute the basics: 1. Teaching 2. Accountability 3. Execute 4. Reinforce 5. Inspect
  • 121. Leader Standard Work checklists should be followed for large percentage of lean tasks. Time devoted to completing leader standard work 1. Team Leaders - 80% of their 2. Department Supervisors - 50% 3. Value Stream Managers - 25% 4. Executives - 10% Leader standard work should be consciously designed to allow discretionary time to do non-repetitive things like respond to problems, train people, and work on improvement tasks.
  • 122. “People don’t resist change. They resist being changed.” - Peter Senge