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Product Design In Ireland - Burton Lee - Ciaran Dynes - TCD UCD Innovation Alliance Talk - Jan 27 2010
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Product Design In Ireland - Burton Lee - Ciaran Dynes - TCD UCD Innovation Alliance Talk - Jan 27 2010

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Talk on "Product Design in Ireland" given by Burton Lee (Stanford), Ciaran Dynes (Progress-IONA) and Ian Quinn (Creganna) as a part of the TCD/UCD Innovation Alliance, at Science Gallery in Dublin, ...

Talk on "Product Design in Ireland" given by Burton Lee (Stanford), Ciaran Dynes (Progress-IONA) and Ian Quinn (Creganna) as a part of the TCD/UCD Innovation Alliance, at Science Gallery in Dublin, January 27 2010. See also companion talk on "Medical Device Product Design in Ireland" by Ian Quinn of Creganna Tactx, given as a part of this lecture.

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Product Design In Ireland - Burton Lee - Ciaran Dynes - TCD UCD Innovation Alliance Talk - Jan 27 2010 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Product Design & Development as the Foundation for the Irish Innovation Economy: the Role of University Engineering Schools Dr. Burton Lee PhD MBA Ian Quinn John Mugan Ciaran Dynes Member, National Innovation Taskforce Chairman and Founder Project Manager, Design Services Product Manager Lecturer, European Entrepreneurship & Innovation Creganna-Tactx Medical Ltd. Creganna-Tactx Medical Ltd. Progress (IONA) Stanford University, School of Engineering Parkmore West, Galway Parkmore West, Galway Dublin TCD/UCD Innovation Alliance Lecture Series Science Gallery, Dublin, Ireland January 27 2010
  • 2. Why Design Matters Hacking The Global Matrix – from Ireland Copyright 2010 Burton H. Lee PhD MBA and Stanford University 2
  • 3. Central Role of Design Percent of Commitment/Expenditures 100 Profit Determined 75 Costs Committed 50 Funds Expended 25 0 Planning Production Concept Design Support Release Detail Design Market Tool  Profit Potential Determined during Project Planning – Importance of strong product definition
  • 4. Agenda • Introduction and Background • Product Design in Ireland Today – Ian Quinn and John Mugan, Creganna, Galway – Ciaran Dynes, IONA • Product Design at Stanford University • Key Takeaways and Conclusions • Thoughts on the Way Forward for Ireland • Q&A Copyright 2010 Burton H. Lee PhD MBA and Stanford University 4
  • 5. About Today’s Speaker Dr. Burton H. Lee PhD MBA • Lecturer, European Entrepreneurship & Innovation – Stanford School of Engineering (2008-2010) • Industry Experience – Innovarium Ventures • Advisor to technology startup companies and venture funds • NSF Engineering Directorate • NASA Ames Research Center • European Commission, REA – Space Angels Network (2007-2010) – Hewlett Packard (1997-1999) • Remote diagnostics, design for test product and services development • Semiconductor test and manufacturing equipment – DaimlerChrysler Labs, Esslingen, Germany (1997-2000) • Internet-based remote diagnostics and customer support – General Electric Corporate R&D Labs, Albany, NY (2003-2004) • Hydrogen strategy, roadmapping and research programs • Policy Experience – Member, Innovation Taskforce, Dept of the Taoiseach, Ireland (2009-2010) – Innovation Policy Advisor, Richardson Campaign for President (2007-2008) – S&T Fellow, National Academy of Sciences (2006) • Education – PhD Mechanical/Electrical Engineering, Stanford University (2002) – MBA Finance/Entrepreneurship, Cornell University (2004) Copyright 2010 Burton H. Lee PhD MBA and Stanford University 5
  • 6. Disclaimer The opinions expressed in this presentation are those of the author(s) alone, and should not be construed as representing the views of the Innovation Taskforce, Stanford University or any other institution or group with which the speaker may be affiliated. Views expressed in the Key Takeaways and Conclusions section below are Dr. Burton Lee’s alone Copyright 2010 Burton H. Lee PhD MBA and Stanford University 6
  • 7. Introduction and Background Copyright 2010 Burton H. Lee PhD MBA and Stanford University 7
  • 8. Innovation Taskforce Role  Field visits to – Galway (October 2009) • NUI Galway host • Creganna, Crospon, Medtronic, DERI, Marine Institute – Cork (December 2009) • Tyndall/UCC host • Biomass, JnJ, CIT – Belfast (December 2009) • Northern Ireland Science Park @ Titanic Quarter • Queens University – Visits in/around Dublin • Intel, IMDA, TCD, UCD, Forfas, Enterprise Ireland, IDA, various angel and VC groups  Focus areas – Enterprise Innovation in existing companies and sectors – Product Design and Development Capacity – Infrastructure relevant for innovation (broadband, wetlabs, testbeds) – Angel investment Copyright 2010 Burton H. Lee PhD MBA and Stanford University 8
  • 9. Innovation in Irish Enterprises Share of Turnover from New Product Innovations Irish companies are underperforming !! Copyright 2010 Burton H. Lee PhD MBA and Stanford University 9
  • 10. 17th International Conference on Engineering Design August 2009 @ Stanford • ICED ‘09 Attendees (~ 520 total) – USA 112 – Germany 73 – UK 58 – France 42 – Sweden 34 – Netherlands 33 – Japan 22 – Denmark 16 – Finland 11 – Italy 9 – Serbia/Croatia 5 – Spain 4 – Malta 3 – Iran 1 – Republic of Ireland 0 – Turkey 0 Copyright 2010 Burton H. Lee PhD MBA and Stanford University 10
  • 11. Absence of a Robust Product Design & Development Capability in Ireland  MNCs  Many do not do new product design & development in Ireland  Medical device firms seem to be the exception here  JnJ, Medtronic  Indigenous Irish enterprises and Startups  New product design and development not viewed as a strength or core competency in Ireland  Exceptions: medical devices and software engineering  New foods and agricultural equipment may also be an exception here  HEI’s  Few have product design programs  Exceptions: National College of Art & Design; NUI Maynooth  Little design research – Engineering Schools appear not to be active here  Seem largely disconnected from those indigenous Irish companies and startups that do product design and development  Few contacts at MNCs outside Ireland that do product design  Government  Appear to be few focused programs aimed at strengthening HPSU technical or management teams in this area  Has historically received little H. Lee PhD MBA and Stanford University Copyright 2010 Burton policy attention 11
  • 12. Product Design in Ireland Today Copyright 2010 Burton H. Lee PhD MBA and Stanford University 12
  • 13. See Separate Medical Device Product Design Presentation by Creganna Tactx Medical Ian Quinn and John Mugan TCD/UCD Innovation Alliance Wed Jan 27 2010
  • 14. Software Engineering Design Methodologies The IONA Experience Ciaran Dynes Director of Product Management Progress (IONA) TCD/UCD Innovation Alliance Wed Jan 27 2010
  • 15. Ciaran Dynes • Based in Dublin, Ireland • Joined IONA in 1997, Progress 2008 • Multiple roles Product Management, Professional Services, Principal Engineer, Engineering Manager • Director of Product Management, with responsibility in managing $100M+ commercial middleware integration product lines, rated #1 by Forrester Research • Extensive knowledge of working in international environments, from across Europe, US and China • http://ie.linkedin.com/in/ciarandynes
  • 16. There are two ways of constructing a software design: “ One way is to make it so simple that there are obviously no deficiencies, and the other way is to make it so complicated that there are no obvious deficiencies. "
 -- C. A. R. Hoare
  • 17. Waterfall Approach to Software Design
  • 18. Rational Unified Process
  • 19. Agile Methodologies in Software Design
  • 20. Design@IONA • Iona/PRGS involved in Enterprise Integration Software • Modular, components, open API, loose coupled interfaces
  • 21. @IONA, we learned that…. “How good the design is doesn't matter near as much as whether the design is getting better or worse. If it is getting better, day by 
day, I can live with it forever. If it is getting worse, I will die. ”
 --Kent Beck eXtreme Programming (XP)
  • 22. Move towards XP • Iterative design, development and production processes • Established contract between Development and Business • You-may-never-need-It and keep-it-simple-stupid • Also adopt Interactive Design approaches from Cooper Design • CPI – Continuous Product Integration
  • 23. More Recently (2005-..) • Influence of working with and for Open Source projects and communities • Major demand from customer for Open APIs but that span multiple vendors products – Eclipse Development platform – iPhone, Android • Demand from the Business to deliver same software through different Sales channels, e.g. SAAS and on-premise
  • 24. Product Design at Stanford University Copyright 2010 Burton H. Lee PhD MBA and Stanford University 24
  • 25. Organization of ME Dept at Stanford  Biomechanical Engineering (BME) Program  Design Group  The Design Group emphasizes cognitive skill development for creative design.  Automatic control, computer-aided design, creativity, design aesthetics, design for manufacturability, design research, experimental stress analysis, fatigue and fracture mechanics, finite element analysis, human factors, kinematics, manufacturing systems, microcomputers in design, micro-electromechanics systems (MEMS), robotics, and vehicle dynamics.  Undergraduate and graduate programs in Product Design  Jointly with the Department of Art and Art History  Centrally involved in founding Stanford's Hasso Plattner Institute of Design.  Product Realization Lab, Center for Design Research; CarLab; Rapid Prototyping Lab for Energy and Biology; others  Flow Physics and Computational Engineering (FPCE) Group  Mechanics and Computation Group  Thermosciences Group Copyright 2010 Burton H. Lee PhD MBA and Stanford University 25
  • 26. Product Design @ Stanford Engineering  Graduate Teaching Programs  Design Project Experience with Corporate Partners (ME310)  Design for Manufacturability (ME317)  Medical Device Design (ME294)  Smart Product Design (ME218)  Undergraduate programs  Major in Product Design  Product Design Research  Center for Design Research  Manufacturing Modelling Lab  d.school (Engineering + Business + Humanities) Copyright 2010 Burton H. Lee PhD MBA and Stanford University 26
  • 27. Design for Manufacturability ME 317 - Structured Design Methods and Tools - dfM • Format – Project-based graduate course augmented by classroom lectures – 5 month program over 2 academic quarters – 4-10 on campus projects each year • Projects defined by interested enterprises – European, US and Asian MNCs – Automotive, computing, consumer goods, aero, other • Student teams – 3-4 students at Stanford (ME, EE, CS, other) • Outcomes – Mechatronic product prototypes: hardware and software – Engineering and customer data – Trained graduate students – Smarter companies with new product ideas and demos – “help working engineers solve product development problems” • Funded by firms ($12K/year/team) – Covers engineering supplies, admin, some travel – http://me317.stanford.edu/ Copyright 2010 Burton H. Lee PhD MBA and Stanford University 27
  • 28. ME317 Structured Methods • ME317A: Product Definition • ME317B: Quality by Design – CVCA/Value Graph (VOC) – Morphological Diagram – Functional Analysis – Pugh Concept Selection – Scenario/Use-case Design – Quality Scorecarding – Quality Function Deployment – Robust Design Basics – Cost Worth Analysis – PokaYoke/Error Proofing – Design for Assy/Complexity – Robust Design Modeling – Design/Process FMEA – Decision Analytic Score/NPV – Design for Variety/Platforms – Design for Environment – Amorphous System Design – Showcasing
  • 29. ME317 Structured Methods Concept/Architecture Detailed User Requirements Design Cost-Worth DFA 101 Poke Yoke Scenario Graph Function Tree Assembly FMEA QFD I Morph Diagram Fishbone QFD II Pugh Selection Assembly Affinity Diagram Value Graph Product Structure Tree Analysis CVCA Structure Use Case Graph Analysis Prototyping NPV Product Definition Assessment Scorecarding Elevator Pitch Framework Project Priority Matrix Showcasing Project Management
  • 30. ME317 Structured Methods QFD: Its all about the requirements Voice of the Engineering Customer (VOC) Metrics (EM) QFD I Engineering Solution Metrics Elements (EM) (parts characteristics) QFD II
  • 31. ME317 Structured Methods Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA)  Failure scenarios have different probabilities & consequences Scenario 1: probability 1, consequence 1 Alarm works Kitchen damage Grease fire Kitchen fire next-level end effect 1 Scenario 1 effect 1 immediate cause effect next-level effect 2 end effect 2 Scenario 2 Alarm fails Building damage Scenario 2: probability 2, consequence 2
  • 32. provide ambient air Function electricity Structure switch Failure supply air fan housing fan modes convert elec. assy motor to rotation provide convert rotation fan blade airflow to flow causes heating support flow element local generation springs effects convey flow heating thermocouple assy control flow end Dry temperature switch Hair Hair effects supply electicity heat shield Dryer convert elec. front grid to heat heat air front control front case housing temperature power cord transfer heat to air switch actuator provide handle rear housing provide user provide rear interface controls screen housing FMEA System Models protect user ground wire Function-Structure Map power source
  • 33. Not your Father’s dfM Design-for-Product Lifecycle • Progression from DFA to ME317 to AdfM – dfM across the Organization dfM Scope / Viewpoint Enterprise AdfM (CEO) ME317 Plant (Gen. Mgr) NPV/Scorecarding Product (Designer) DFE DFP DFA DFV DFS Each Process Traditional IE / QC (Operator) Material Parts Product Distrib. Service Recycle Process. Fab. Assy. Sales Support Reuse Product Life-cycle / Supply Chain
  • 34. Brief History of DFM Value Engineering TQM Assy Time & Design for Assembly Motion Studies AI/Expert Systems Taguchi Methods Motorola Six Sigma Design for X’s (Service, Platform…) Design for Six Sigma Stanford ME317 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010
  • 35. ME317 History Alumni List is Growing • 2000+ students past 15 years – On-campus/SCPD students – Licensed delivery at companies such as Cisco, Hitachi, Toshiba – Numerous Company Workshops # Students
  • 36. ME317 Projects 2010 • On-Campus Projects (Details on 1/06/10) – LightGuard: Revitalize the product portfolio and feature-set for Pedestrian Safety systems – Ebara: Developing a new Service-as-a-Business opportunity in the industrial custom pump market – Simbol Mining: Improve the geothermal brine lithium extraction process while satisfying environmental constraints – Genentech: Next Generation growth hormone self-injection device – Medconx: Cost reduction of medical device connectors – Allevor: Minimally invasive hemorrhoid ligation • SCPD students form teams and define their own projects – Bring BIG $ (NPV) to your company! – Link with your development/business process (e.g. NPI)
  • 37. ME317 Projects 2010 Example Industry Project • Nissan Motor Corporation [ automotive manufacturer ] – Goal: • Optimize the casting operation of an automotive suspension component • Determine a balance between the environmental impact, cost, and functional realization of the casting operation – Tasks • Understand the customer requirements for the suspension component, as they are fundamental to car function, safety, and performance. • Identify harmful facets of the casting operation, such as CO2 emissions; • Recommend design, process, and practice changes that reduce the environmental impact while maintaining the suspension member’s integrity. – Methods • Benchmarking activities: interviews, surveys and site tours to learn about the machines and processes used in production. • Employ Design for Manufacturability tools to gain insight into Nissan’s engineering and business practices. • Combine this information with advanced manufacturing research and user-centered design thinking Copyright 2010 Burton H. Lee PhD MBA and Stanford University 37
  • 38. ME317 Projects 2010 • Types of Successful Projects – NOT on your businesses’ critical path AND fits one or more of the following categories • A “hairy issue” that you don’t have the resources to work on; • A cost reduction of an existing product; • Exploration for a new market for an existing technology; • Identification of how to apply GREEN technology to a new arena; • Vast improvement of quality levels and/or yields • Recent project partners – Toyota, ABB, Medtronic, Cisco, Ebara and Satiety Copyright 2010 Burton H. Lee PhD MBA and Stanford University 38
  • 39. ME310 - Design-by-Immersion Design Project Experience with Corporate Partners  Real world design challenges brought forth by corporate partners.  Student teams  must design a complete system while being mindful of not only the primary function but also the usability, desirability, and societal implications.  prototype and test many of their design concepts and in the end create a full proof-of-concept system that demonstrates their ideas.  Design-by-immersion in a product development environment for interdisciplinary, distributed, engineering design teams.  Three-quarter series (full academic year)  http://me310.stanford.edu/ Copyright 2010 Burton H. Lee PhD MBA and Stanford University 39
  • 40. ME310 Design Process Copyright 2010 Burton H. Lee PhD MBA and Stanford University 40
  • 41. ME310 Course Format • Projects defined by interested enterprises – European, US and Asian MNCs – Automotive, computing, consumer goods, aero, other • Student teams – 4-5 students at Stanford (ME, EE, CS, other) – European universities and student teams also participate • Format – Project-based learning augmented by classroom lectures – Design (CAD, etc) + Machining + Software => iterative prototypes • Outcomes – Mechatronic product prototypes: hardware and software – Engineering and customer data, presentations and reports – Trained graduate students – many often hired by project partners!! – Smarter companies with new product ideas and demos • Funded by firms ($125K/year/project) – Covers Stanford teaching team, engineering supplies, admin, some travel Copyright 2010 Burton H. Lee PhD MBA and Stanford University 41
  • 42. Future Blood Glucose Meters (2006) • Project Topic: User Interface Research and Design for Future Blood Glucose Meters Corporate Partner: Abbott Diabetes Care Academic Partner: Lulea (Sweden) Copyright 2010 Burton H. Lee PhD MBA and Stanford University 42
  • 43. Ki'i (2007) • Project Topic: Very Human Technology Corporate Partner: Nokia Academic Partner: Helsinki University of Technology Copyright 2010 Burton H. Lee PhD MBA and Stanford University 43
  • 44. OpenRoad (2005) • Project Topic: Improving the Open Air Experience Corporate Partner: BMW Academic Partner: Technical University of Munich Copyright 2010 Burton H. Lee PhD MBA and Stanford University 44
  • 45. ME 310 Corporate Partners
  • 46. Facilities Requirements • Minimal facilities and equipment required – Basic woodworking, plastics and metals cutting, assembly and fastening tools and materials – Basic electronics tools • Soldering guns, breadboarding benches – Video-conferencing System • “Heavier duty” equipment and facilities available – But not emphasized Copyright 2010 Burton H. Lee PhD MBA and Stanford University 46
  • 47. Stanford ME310 Design Loft Copyright 2010 Burton H. Lee PhD MBA and Stanford University 47
  • 48. ME 310 Academic Partners Copyright 2010 Burton H. Lee PhD MBA and Stanford University 48
  • 49. Q&A Copyright 2010 Burton H. Lee PhD MBA and Stanford University 49
  • 50. d.school Vision  Our Vision “We believe great innovators and thinkers need to be great design thinkers”.  A bold new design institute at Stanford  We have a dream about building a place for design at Stanford.  We want to build a place where design thinking is the glue that binds people together, a place we call the d.school.  We want the d.school to be a place for Stanford students and faculty in engineering, medicine, business, the humanities, and education to learn design thinking and work together to solve big problems in a human centered way.  We want it to be a place where people from big companies, start-ups, schools, nonprofits, government, and anyone else who realizes the power of design thinking, can join our multidisciplinary teaching, prototyping, and research. Copyright 2010 Burton H. Lee PhD MBA and Stanford University 50
  • 51. d.school Faculty and Team  Our Team  “We couldn’t be more different, except for our shared values. And that makes working together enjoyable.”  Inspiration behind the d.school  A core team of Stanford faculty from  Computer Science, Mechanical Engineering, Management Science and Engineering, and  the Graduate School of Business  Consulting faculty, staff members, and d.school fellows.  This group is led by David Kelley, a professor of mechanical engineering who has taught design at Stanford for over 25 years, and the founder of IDEO, one of the most renowned design firms in the world…. Copyright 2010 Burton H. Lee PhD MBA and Stanford University 51
  • 52. d.school Courses  Design Thinking Bootcamp: Experiences in Innovation and Design: Fall 2009  Entrepreneurial Design For Extreme Affordability: Winter and Spring 2010  Cross Cultural Design: Winter and Spring 2010  Personal and Interpersonal Dynamics (PAID): Winter and Spring 2010  Prototyping Change in Entrepreneurial Firms: Winter 2010  Transformative Design: Winter 2010  K-12 Learning Lab Independent Projects: Winter 2010  From Play to Innovation: Spring 2010  media + design: Spring 2010  Designing Liberation Technologies: Spring 2010  Designing For Sustainable Abundance: Spring 2010  Launch Pad; Design and Launch Your Product or Service: Spring 2010  No Teacher Left Behind; Rethinking the Traditional Teacher Role and Career: Spring 2010  Creativity and Innovation: Spring 2010  Creative Gym; A Design Thinking Skills Studio: Winter 2010  d.school Summer College, Adventures in Design Thinking: Summer 2010 Copyright 2010 Burton H. Lee PhD MBA and Stanford University 52
  • 53. d.school Around the Globe  d.school Paris (now under development)  d.school Zurich  d.school …. Copyright 2010 Burton H. Lee PhD MBA and Stanford University 53
  • 54. Key Takeaways and Conclusions Copyright 2010 Burton H. Lee PhD MBA and Stanford University 54
  • 55. Linkages between Design Research & Teaching @ Stanford • Design Research @ Stanford – Essential to sound design teaching and practice – PhD research is the backbone of ME317 and ME310 flagship courses • Industry problems provide excellent xxx for PhD engineering research • PhD students – Take design courses to fulfill part of their course requirements – Use design courses to develop research ideas, and to test new methods – Best-in-class product development firms • Why do companies come to Stanford? – An extension of their in-house product development and prototyping groups – Less expensive than doing in-house – New ideas and new blood – Incorporate latest design research into their products and strategy Copyright 2010 Burton H. Lee PhD MBA and Stanford University 55
  • 56. Examples of Industrially-Relevant PhD Design Research @ Stanford • Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) • Design for Variety • Design for Environment Copyright 2010 Burton H. Lee PhD MBA and Stanford University 56
  • 57. Burton Lee PhD Dissertation Example Industrial Product Design & Diagnostics • Industry Problem – Little reuse of design models and knowledge by customer support organizations developing offboard diagnostics and help systems • Impact – High cost of development of offboard customer support systems – Customer support systems may not provide comprehensive and accurate diagnostics – Difficult to scale offboard diagnostics with product design complexity/variety • Thesis Topic – An investigation into approaches to improving knowledge sharing and reuse between product design and customer support teams • Key Challenge – Design engineering models do not capture causal knowledge essential for diagnostics – Sole exception is Failure Modes and Effect Analysis (FMEA) modeling • Result – Developed new FMEA knowledge representation based on Bayesian network formalism • Funded by DaimlerChrysler Labs, Stuttgart Copyright 2010 Burton H. Lee PhD MBA and Stanford University 57
  • 58. Design Society Special Interest Groups (SIGs) • Applied Engineering Design Science • Computational Design Synthesis • Decision Making in Design Product Design is a • Design Creativity Rich Field for • Design Education Research Today… • Design Theory • Development of Mechatronic Products and Systems • Eco Design • Human Behavior in Design (HBiD) • Managing Structural Complexity Copyright 2010 Burton H. Lee PhD MBA and Stanford University 58
  • 59. Product Design An Alternative Industry-University Collaboration Model  Outside today’s dominant “Research” paradigm – Avoid continuing contention and confusion over “basic” vs “applied” research – Combines teaching and research  Customer-centric relationships – Industry is your customer!! • New ideas, smart people, technology, funding, student internships & jobs, consulting – Treat them well – listen to your customer  Different performance metrics are needed here – vs research-centric metrics of #PhDs, #citations – # new product prototypes, # new product introductions, # new product revenues – # students hired, etc  New MNC relationships required – Requires Irish HEI’s to develop relationships with MNCs outside Ireland – Best-in-class global product development firms • Germany: Siemens, Bosch, BMW, Daimler, SAP, etc • Finland: Nokia • Japan: Toshiba, Sony, Panasonic, etc • USA: Medtronic, Guidant, etc – HEI’s must be given freedom to work with best-of-class non-Irish MNCs  Financial incentives for companies to work with HEI’s – Product design and development qualifies under R&D tax credits  IP issues must be addressed – Who owns new product inventions and related IP developed with university teams? Copyright 2010 Burton H. Lee PhD MBA and Stanford University 59
  • 60. Capacity Building in Industry & HEIs Product Design & Development • Industry – Executive education programs aimed at • Technical teams • Management teams • HEI’s – Teaching programs – Research programs – Inter-disciplinary centers and facilities – Faculty training • Global Observation Teams – Go visit the best-in-class companies and universities – USA, Germany, Finland, Netherlands, Japan, China • New Metrics needed – Get these right! • Timeframe? – Much can be accomplished in 2-3 years • Stanford Engineering can help !! Copyright 2010 Burton H. Lee PhD MBA and Stanford University 60
  • 61. The Way Forward for Ireland A National Product Design & Development Roadmap • Target companies – Indigenous Irish enterprises • Technology: medical device, software, energy/environment, other • Traditional: agriculture, food • Services firms – HPSUs and other scalable startups – Consumer and industrial products firms – MNCs committed to doing new product design & development in Ireland • Integrate product design support and skills with current EI and other company support programs Copyright 2010 Burton H. Lee PhD MBA and Stanford University 61
  • 62. Working Group on Product Design & Development  Industry-University-Government – Bring companies and HEI’s together, to showcase to university engineering school and other faculty what Ireland’s best product design firms are doing today • Indigenous Irish enterprises • Multinationals with a commitment to doing product design and development in Ireland – Discuss industry roadmaps, skill and workforce needs over next 3-5-7 years • Sector-by-sector and national level – Showcase and encourage an inter-disciplinary approach to product and services design • Engineering, Humanities & Sciences, Arts – Overseas delegations to assess best-in-class in product design companies, teaching & research – All-Island scope • Dublin, Galway, Cork, Limerick, Belfast, other – Industry validation of a national product design agenda and roadmap is essential !! • Without industry validation, unlikely to secure govt support  A National Agenda and Roadmap – White Paper to circulate in Industry, HEI’s and Government – Recommend specific program objectives, funding levels and oversight responsibility  Follow-on to Innovation Taskforce – Policy foundation for product design as a new element of national innovation strategy  Appropriate branding of this initiative is essential – “Product Design and Development” • Clear relation to jobs creation, economic development and innovation • v “Design Thinking” branding? Too academic sounding … Copyright 2010 Burton H. Lee PhD MBA and Stanford University 62
  • 63. Innovation Policy ? vs. Product Design & Development  “Innovation policy and strategy” in most countries neglects product design & development – vs university research, IP, tech transfer, licensing & spinouts – Not considered as “sexy” as VC, incubators, etc – Far too much “obsession” with the (difficult & long term) Stanford & MIT models  Improving enterprise innovation via – Better products and services (within 2-3 years) – Accelerated product introduction cycles – Offers faster, less risky path to new job creation than university spinouts and licensing – New innovation model – offers oppty for global competitive advantage  The global product design teaching, research and industry communities have not clearly articulated their relevance to national innovation strategy and policy – Poor track record of advocacy – Strong tendency to be too inward looking – A bit too academic in branding ? “Design Thinking” … Copyright 2010 Burton H. Lee PhD MBA and Stanford University 63
  • 64. Please Visit Stanford Design !! (but if come, we need to know you are serious)  Before you come:  Agree on how Ireland should come together to develop an indigenous design capability • Industry + HEI’s • Working Group or other appropriate entity  Come as a Delegation  Dublin universities + regional HEI’s  Easier to manage for Stanford • We want to avoid inundating faculty with visits and discussions  Show us you are serious about working on a national approach to product design Copyright 2010 Burton H. Lee PhD MBA and Stanford University 64
  • 65. International Conference on Engineering Design ICED ’11 Copyright 2010 Burton H. Lee PhD MBA and Stanford University 65
  • 66. Thank You! • Companies – Ian Quinn, Creganna – John Mugan, Creganna – Ciaran Dynes, Progress (IONA) – Dr. Chris Horn, IONA • Trinity College Dublin – Dr. John Hegarty – Dr. David Lloyd – Dr. John Fitzpatrick – Dr. Brian Broderick • University College Dublin – Dr. Hugh Brady – Dr. Des Fitzgerald – Dr. Michael Gilchrist • NUI Galway – Dr. Jim Browne • Science Gallery Copyright 2010 Burton H. Lee PhD MBA and Stanford University 66
  • 67. Q&A Copyright 2010 Burton H. Lee PhD MBA and Stanford University 67