Visual Thinking Presentation for UnitedHealth Innovation Day
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Visual Thinking Presentation for UnitedHealth Innovation Day

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Pictures are global and transcend words. They carry metaphors, symbols and meaning beyond the written word. Capturing ideas with images takes less time than reading text or verbalizing ideas, and......

Pictures are global and transcend words. They carry metaphors, symbols and meaning beyond the written word. Capturing ideas with images takes less time than reading text or verbalizing ideas, and making drawings helps you tell stories more effectively. Visual thinking can help you make sense of complexity, help find patterns and surface critical issues, help make faster, better decisions, and help you take action and do 'good' for your business.

In order to get comfortable with the skill of visual thinking, we need to
build confidence in drawing ability for those with no experience, help people develop a personal toolbox of sketching shortcuts, promote and encourage visual thinking as a useful tool at your desk and in the conference room.

The goal is to move from "let's THINK out loud" to "let's VISUALLY THINK out loud" as a way to brainstorm, collaborate and innovate together in the workplace.

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  • 1. “VISUAL  THINKING”    Presenter:   Sponsor:  Liz  Burow         Russell  C.  Petrella,  Ph.D.  –    Burlix  Studio   President,  UnitedHealthcare,   Community  &  State    
  • 2. I AM A VISUAL THINKINGUSER, ADVOCATEAND EDUCATOR
  • 3. WHY VISUAL THINKING?BENEFIT– SHOW NON-LINEAR RELATIONSHIPS,ENCOURAGE HOLISTIC THINKING
  • 4. WHY VISUAL THINKING?BENEFIT: IMPROVES QUALITY AND SPEED OF IDEATIONAND PROBLEM SOLVING, MAKE IDEAS TANGIBLE
  • 5. WHY VISUAL THINKING?BENEFIT: LOWER BARRIER FOR ENTRY, PARTICIPATORYCONVERSATIONAL
  • 6. WHY VISUAL THINKING?BENEFIT: SHOW VS TELL, MAKES COMPLEXITY EASY TO UNDERSTANDAND MANAGE
  • 7. WHY VISUAL THINKING?BENEFIT: DECREASE TIME IT TAKES TO EXPLAIN AND UNDERSTAND ANIDEA, BETTER COORDINATED
  • 8. WHY VISUAL THINKING? VISUAL THINKING HELPS FIND PATTERNS, SURFACE CRITICAL ISSUES, TAKE ACTION FASTERJOHN SNOW: PLOT MAPPING | 1854 Broad St Cholera Outbreak, London
  • 9. WHY VISUAL THINKING? PREVENTABLE WOUNDS OTHER VISUAL THINKING HELPS FIND PATTERNS, SURFACE CRITICAL ISSUES, TAKE ACTION FASTERFLORENCE NIGHTINGALE | Polar Area Diagram & Sanitary Reform
  • 10. WHY VISUAL THINKING?STEPHEN COVEY, 2 x 2 MATRIX FOR PRIORITIZING QUALITATIVE DATA
  • 11. WHY VISUAL THINKING? “DATA IN, INFORMATION OUT” – STEPHEN COVEY
  • 12. WHY VISUAL THINKING? “WE ARE MOVING FROM THE INFORMATION AGE TO THE CONCEPTUAL AGE” – DANIEL H. PINK, A WHOLE NEW MIND
  • 13. “WE ARE NO LONGER KNOWLEDGE WORKERS,BUT RATHER HIGH CONCEPT PEOPLE...(WE)DETECT PATTERNS AND OPPORTUNITIES, CRAFT ASATISFYING NARRATIVE, AND COMBINE SEEMINGLYUNRELATED IDEAS INTO SOMETHING NEW...(WE) EMPATHIZE WITH OTHERS, UNDERSTANDSUBTLETIES OF HUMAN INTERACTIONS, FIND JOY,STRETCH BEYOND THE QUOTIDIAN IN PURSUIT OFPURPOSE AND MEANING. ”– DANIEL H. PINK, A WHOLE NEW MIND
  • 14. GREAT. SO, IF ITS SO IMPORTANT, WE CAN ASSUMEWE’RE ALL USING VISUAL THINKING ALREADY, RIGHT
  • 15. HERE’S THE PROBLEM:
  • 16. HERE’S THE PROBLEM:
  • 17. HERE’S THE PROBLEM: PEOPLE THINK IT’S: TOO COMPLICATED CAN’T DO IT TAKES TOO MUCH TIME NOT USEFUL DON’T KNOW HOW DIDN’T EVEN THINK TO TRY
  • 18. HERE’S THE OPPORTUNITY: START THINKING ABOUT DRAWING AS A WAY TO THINK
  • 19. HOW WE’RE GOING TO GET THERE: 1 GET COMFY
  • 20. HOW WE’RE GOING TO GET THERE: 1 2 GET COMFY APPLY METHODS
  • 21. HOW WE’RE GOING TO GET THERE: 1 2 GET COMFY APPLY METHODS 3 PICK RESOLUTION
  • 22. LET’S MOVE FROM: “I’M JUSTBLAH BLAH BLAH THINKING BLAH BLAH OUT LOUD BLA H BLAH HERE” BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH
  • 23. TO: “I’M JUSTBLAH BLAH THINKING BLAH VISUALLY OUT LOUD BLAH HERE” BLAH BLAH BLAH
  • 24. 1. GET COMFY
  • 25. HOW?: REMOVE THE BLOCKAGE INFORMATION/ NO TOOLS DECISIONS NO LANGUAGE DATA INHIBITION ATTITUDEPROBLEM CULTURESOLVING SPACE
  • 26. HOW?: DRAW LIKE A CAVEMAN
  • 27. HOW?: DRAW LIKE A CAVEMAN USE LEARN FROM SYMBOLS/ FAILURE/ ICONS/ SURVIVAL/ SIMPLE LANGUAGE ADAPTIVE MAKE IT LOW TECH/ CULTURAL/ USE RITUAL/ SHORTCUTS SPATIAL
  • 28. CAVEMAN:5/20/12 USE SYMBOLS Drawing Development in Children Perspectives Drawing Development in Children Viktor Lowenfeld Betty Edwards 2 | 3 | 4 | 6 | 8 | 12 | 2 years 3 years 4 years 6 years 8 years 10 years 12 years 14 years 16 years 14 yrs Viktor Lowenfeld Scribbling The preschematic stage The schematic stage The gang stage: The dawning The pseudo‐ naturalistic The period of decision Creative and stage realism stage Mental Growth First conscious creation of form occurs The child arrives at a "schema," a Art at this stage of life is First around age three and provides a definite way of portraying an The child finds that schematic generalization This stage marks the end of art as something to be done or left disordered tangible record of the childs thinking object, although it will be modified no longer suffices to express reality. This spontaneous activity as children alone. Natural development scribbles are process. The first representational when he needs to portray something dawning of how things really look is usually are increasingly critical of their will cease unless a conscious simply records attempt is a person, usually with important. The schema represents expressed with more detail for individual drawings. The focus is now on the decision is made to improve of enjoyable circle for head and two vertical lines the childs active knowledge of the parts, but is far from naturalism in drawing. end product as they strive to drawing skills. Students are kinesthetic for legs. Later other forms develop, subject. At this stage, there is Space is discovered and depicted with create "adult‐like" naturalistic critically aware of the activity, not clearly recognizable and often quite definite order in space overlapping objects in drawings and a horizon drawings. Light and shadow, folds, immaturity of their drawing attempts at complex. Children continually search relationships: everything sits on the line rather than a base line. Children begin to and motion are observed with and are easily discouraged. portraying the for new concepts so symbols base line. compare their work and become more critical mixed success, translated to Lowenfelds solution is to visual world. constantly change. of it. While they are more independent of paper. Space is depicted as three‐ enlarge their concept of adult After six adults, they are more anxious to conform to dimensional by diminishing the art to include non‐ months of their peers. size of objects that are further representational art and art scribbling, away. occupations besides painting marks are (architecture, interior design, more orderly handcrafts, etc.) as children become more RETURN TO engrossed. Soon they begin to name scribbles, an YOUR 6YR important milestone in development. Betty Edwards Creative and Mental Growth The scribbling stage The stage of symbols Pictures that tell stories OLD SELF The Landscape By five or six, children develop a set The stage of complexity The stage of realism The crisis period The beginning of adolescence After weeks of At four or five, the of symbols to create a landscape At nine or ten years, The passion for marks the end of artistic that eventually becomes a single development among most DRAWING DEVELOPMENT IN CHILDREN: VICTOR LOWENFELD, BETTY EDWARDS Random scribbling, child begins to tell children try for more realism is in full variation repeated endlessly. A blue children, due to frustration at scribbles begin children make stories or work out detail, hoping to bloom. When the discovery of problems with her line and sun at the top of the page achieve greater drawings do not "getting things right." Those who at age one‐ art: a drawn drawings, changing and a green line at the bottom realism, a prized goal. "come out right" (look do manage to weather the crisis Copyright 1985 and 1987 Susan K. Donley, All Rights Reserved and‐a‐half, symbol can stand basic forms as become symbolic representations of Concern for where real) they seek help and learn the "secret" of drawing but quite for a real thing needed to express the sky and ground. Landscapes are things are in their to resolve conflict will become absorbed in it. quickly take in the meaning. Often compose carefully, giving the drawings is replaced between how the Edwards believes that proper on definite environment. once the problem is impression that removing any single by concern for how subject looks and teaching methods will help shapes. Circular form expressed, the form would throw off the balance things look‐‐ previously stored children learn to see and draw and Circular
  • 29. CAVEMAN: USE SYMBOLS RETURNING TO YOUR 6 YEAR OLD SELF- THIS IS ALL YOU NEED TO GET YOUR MESSAGE ACROSS
  • 30. CAVEMAN: SYMBOLS/MEANING DRAW WITH SYMBOLS TO CONVEY MEANING. SHOW AS MUCH ACTION, STORY AND SPACE IN ONE DRAWING AS POSSIBLE.
  • 31. CAVEMAN: SIMPLE LANGUAGE USE BASIC SHAPES (LETTERS OF THE ALPHABET) TO TO BUILD DIFFERENT ‘NOUNS’, ‘VERBS’, ‘ADJECTIVES’ GLYPHS: 12 VISUAL SHAPES THAT YOU CAN USE TO CREATE ANY VISUAL COPYRIGHT: SUNNIBROWN.COM
  • 32. CAVEMAN: SPEED/ADAPABLITY PLAY TO YOUR STRENGTHS, THINK SURVIVAL, ACCEPT IMPERFECTION, ADAPT, LEARN PLAYING PICTIONARY WITH STUDENTS
  • 33. CAVEMAN: FIND SHORTCUTS DEVELOP SHORTCUTS. CREATE A DRAWING STYLE AND SIGNATURES, PLAY TO YOUR STRENGTHS. DAWING FOR THINKERS WORKSHOP: PRACTICE DRAWING SIGNATURE PEOPLE
  • 34. CAVEMAN: MAKE IT CULTURAL MAKE DRAWING A PART OF YOUR DAILY LIFE, YOUR DAILY RITUAL AND YOUR OFFICE CULTURE. LEAVE DRAWINGS UP AS A WAY TO COMMUNICATE YOUR IDEAS AND YOUR PROCESS. THE STANFORD DESIGN SCHOOL, CALIFORNIA
  • 35. 2. APPLYINGTHE METHODS
  • 36. BE A FIT THE RIGHT METHOD FOR THE RIGHTTEACHER BENEFIT
  • 37. BE A TEACHER LEARN BY SEEING LEARN BY LISTENING, TALKING SPATIAL/VISUAL AUDITORY TACTILE/KINETIC LOGICAL LEARN BY DOING LEARN BY THINKING COMMUNICATE FOR ALL LEARNING TYPES
  • 38. TEACH WITH YOUR: HEAD HEART HANDS CREDIT: DAVE GRAY
  • 39. TEACH TO THE: HEAD SCHEMATIC VISUALS: LOGICAL/STRATEGIC CREDIT: DAVE GRAY
  • 40. TEACH TO THE: EMOTIONAL HEART VISUALS: METAPHORS/ENGAGING/STORIES CREDIT: DAVE GRAY
  • 41. TEACH TO THE: PRACTICAL HANDS VISUALS: OPERATIONAL/FUNCTIONAL CREDIT: DAVE GRAY
  • 42. COMPARISON PATH SYSTEM CREDIT: DAVE GRAY
  • 43. HEAD HEART HANDS A B 3 4 2 1 CREDIT: DAVE GRAY
  • 44. IF YOU’RE NOT SURE WHERE TO START, TRY MIND-MAPPING
  • 45. 3. CHOOSE THE RIGHTRESOLUTION
  • 46. VISUAL THINKING ISTECHNOLOGY AGNOSTIC YOU DECIDE WHAT IS RIGHT LOW RES HIGH RES {CHOOSING THE RIGHT RESOLUTION}
  • 47. SIMPLE ELABORATEQUALITATIVE QUANTITATIVEVISION EXECUTIONLOW RES HIGH RES {CHOOSING THE RIGHT RESOLUTION}
  • 48. {CHOOSING THE RIGHT RESOLUTION} SIMPLE ELABORATESTART QUALITATIVE QUANTITATIVE VISION EXECUTION LOW RES HIGH RES FASTER ARTICIPATORY P SSIBLE TORY ACCE LORA EXP
  • 49. {CHOOSING THE RIGHT RESOLUTION}SIMPLE ELABORATE FINISHQUALITATIVE QUANTITATIVEVISION EXECUTIONLOW RES HIGH RES FANCY CONCLUS IVE COMPLE ACCURAT X E
  • 50. LOW RES- A GOOD ENTRY POINT FOR COLLABORATION, INNOVATION
  • 51. HIGH RES- A GOOD ENTRY POINT FOR COMMUNICATING
  • 52. Q: HOW DO WEPUT THIS INTOPRACTICE? TAKE ITBACK TO WORK?
  • 53. A: THIS IS LESSABOUT SKILL ANDMORE ABOUTCULTURE
  • 54. SET AN EXAMPLE- SHOW THAT IT IS OK TO SKETCH AS A WAY TO THINK. NOT EVERYTHING HAS TO BE WORDS.WHAT YOU CAN DO RIGHT AWAY
  • 55. ENCOURAGE AS A WAY TO COMMUNICATE IN MEETINGS, FOR PRESENTATIONSWHAT YOU CAN DO RIGHT AWAY
  • 56. GIVE YOURSELF TIME AND SPACE TO SKETCH AND THINK VISUALLYWHAT YOU CAN DO RIGHT AWAY
  • 57. PRACTICE TALKING AND DRAWING IN FRONT OF OTHERS PRACTICE LIKE AN ATHLETE- FOR MUSCLE MEMORYWHAT YOU CAN DO RIGHT AWAY
  • 58. THE BACK OF THE NAPKIN BY DAN ROAM THE VISUAL DISPLAY OF QUANTITATIVE INFORMATION GAMESTORMING A WHOLE NEW MIND BY EDWARD TUFTE BY DAVE GRAY, SUNNI BY DANIEL PINK BROWN LEARN MORE!WHAT YOU CAN DO RIGHT AWAY
  • 59. FOR ALL OF US HIGH CONCEPT THINKERS WHO NEED TO : MAKE SENSE MAKE DECISIONS TAKE ACTION, DO GOOD
  • 60. BUR OWLIZ RLIX IO.COM @BU STUD LIX IZBUROW BUR E/L LIZ@ OUT.M AB