Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
  • Like
Wattshare
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Now you can save presentations on your phone or tablet

Available for both IPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Wattshare

  • 557 views
Published

 

Published in Technology , Education
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
557
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1.  In the Footsteps of Boulton and Watt:  Industrial Interplays of Creativity and  Technology Andrew Prescott, King’s College London Interface 2012 Birmingham City University, 28 June 2012
  • 2. The Golden Boys (also known as The Carpet Salesmen): Gilded Statue of Matthew Boulton, James Watt and William Murdoch by  William Bloye of Birmingham School of Art, Broad Street,  Birmingham (1956)
  • 3. • Matthew Boulton by C. F. von  Breda, 1792• Birmingham was a long-standing  centre of production of metal  goods• Boulton pioneered the mass  production of highly finished small  objects: belts, buckles, boxes, toys• The Soho Manufactory, shown  here in the background, was the  largest factory in the world• But the portrait illustrates  Boulton’s wider philosophical and  scientific pretentions• He is shown with some items from  his collection of geological  specimens• His interest in manufacturing  grounded in an engagement with  science and philosophy 
  • 4. • Portrait by Breda of James  Watt• Born in Scotland, Watt  trained as maker of scientific  instruments in London• Struggled to earn a living• Employed to repair scientific  instruments at the  University of Glasgow• Invented separate steam  condenser in 1765, but  struggled to secure finance  to develop invention• Partnership with Boulton  established in 1775
  • 5. • Model of rational factory used by James Watt to assist in planning production• Boulton and Watt very forward looking: Neither [Frederick] Taylor, [Henry] Ford, nor other  experts devised anything… that cannot be discovered at Soho before 1805.’• The Industrial Revolution was a major shift in our engagement with technology just as (if  not more) profound than  current digital revolution• The cliched historical comparison for digital technology is with the arrival of print, but  maybe the economic, social and cultural changes of the late 18th century are a better  comparison• Like the computer, the steam engine is a universal machine. Was deployed in many  contexts from mining to mints.• The computer itself is a product of the Industrial Revolution: the idea of the computer  programme dervived from the punch cards used to control Jacquard’s power loom:  http://www.computersciencelab.com/ComputerHistory/HistoryPt2.htm• What lessons do Boulton and Watt offer us today? 
  • 6. James Watt’s workroom in his house at Heathfield Hall. Painting by  Jonathan Pratt, 1889: Birmingham Museums and Art Gallery
  • 7. James Watt’s workshop as reconstructed at the Science Museum. Note the large number of busts and sculptures, which were part of Watt’s attempts to  create a sculpture copying machine. An animation capturing the spirit of Watt’s workshop in which a fantasy of  the sculpture copying machine features is here:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lhk4KcpIkMQ
  • 8. Watt’s sculpture copying machine recalls 3D printing. It is appropriate that moulds used by Watt to test the sculpture copying machine were scanned by a team led by Professor Stuart Robson and Dr Mona Hess from UCL, and used to recover a lost bust of Watt: http://www.thehistoryblog.com/archives/9892  
  • 9. Industrial Revolution 2.0: How the Material World Will Newly Materialise.An installation curated by Murray Moss at the Victoria and Albert Museum. The use of 3D printing to create new forms again harks back to Watt’s engagement  with this form of making. We watched this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JUo6EqAix-o. If you’ve got time, this is also  interesting: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1O_mI3Ei7VY 
  • 10. Watt and Industrial Revolution 2.0• New technologies can be explosive and  patterns of development unpredictable• Ubiquity: it was assumed that steam could be  applied to everything from transport to  sculpture• A refusal to be pigeon-holed with one  technology or one approach• Interaction with aesthetics and creation• The importance of making; nature of creativity
  • 11. Conditions of creativity• Exceptionally vibrant and fertile period of invention.• Not due to technological accident or individual genius:  many factors contributed• Capital investment required was enormous: the wealth  generated by slavery and imperial trade was vital in  these developments• We can’t ever separate technological development  from economics, exploitation or military activities• However, there are some aspects of the work of men  like Boulton and Watt which are important to note 
  • 12. The importance of measurement.  MAKING DEPENDS ON DATA. Industrial Revolutions arise from new relations  between data and making. 
  • 13. • Watt produced a very accurate form of slide rule with a new design to help  him calculate pressures and loadings• Watt was asked to produce his new slide rules for general use. The ‘Soho’  slide rule was much more accurate than previous designs and was the first  standardised slide rule• Watt wanted to use machines to process numbers. He worked out a method  whereby a machine could be used to perform addition, subtraction,  multiplication and division• Contemporary manufacturing techniques were not sufficiently precise to  realise Watt’s vision: as Babbage later found 
  • 14. Watt’s portable drawing machine: in its treatment of  perspective it grappled with the same geometrical problems about the representation of 3D data as the  sculpture copying machine 
  • 15. Conditions of creativity• Provincial outsiders: from Glasgow and  Birmingham• They worked outside the formal academy• But they were profoundly engaged with current  scientific and scholarly theory• They saw no distinction between invention,  manufacturing and philosophy: ‘hack v yack’  would have made no sense to them: they yacked  as they hacked.• Supported by and connected with strong  informal networks of ideas and endeavour 
  • 16. James Watt at the University of  GlasgowJohn Robison: All the young lads of our little place that were any way remarkable for scientific predilection were acquaintances of Mr Watt; and his parlour was a rendezvous for all of his description. Whenever any puzzle came in the way of any of us, we went to Mr Watt. He needed only to be prompted; everything became to him the beginning of a new and serious study; and we knew that he would not quit it till he had either discovered its insignificance, or had made something of it. No matter in what line – languages, antiquity, natural history, - nay, poetry, criticism, and works of taste; as to anything in the line of engineering, whether civil or military, he was at home, and a ready instructor. 
  • 17. Model of Newcomen Steam Engine at the University of Glasgow repaired by Watt in 1765. It was work on this model that led Watt to develop the separate steam condenser.According to John Robison, the model was ‘at first a fine plaything to Mr Watt, and to myself, now a constant visitor at his workshop. But like everything which came into his hands, it soon became an object of most serious study’.At one level, a practical problem, but it was the new theoretical insights of a professor at Glasgow, Joseph Black, which provided Watt with the key to the development of a separate condenser.Robison: ‘Everything became science in his hands’ 
  • 18. • Watt’s workshop wasn’t a laboratory or a  grand building, but it was probably the most  important facility there has ever been in the  500 years of the University of Glasgow• Do we need that type of space now and if so,  what would it look like? • Perhaps the FabLab movement provides one  answer 
  • 19. More about Fab Labs:Fab Lab Manchester: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M5obKQHA3HgWhat is a Fab Lab in three words: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nOPGJ2VBCPoNeil Gershenfeld on Fab Labs: http://www.ted.com/talks/neil_gershenfeld_on_fab_labs.html  
  • 20. Above all:• Watt questioned everything, and examined every  problem afresh from first principles• Never accepted existing standards or procedures,  but reasoned afresh each time• Robison’s story of the masonic pipe organ  illustrates Watt’s constant inventiveness• How far in digital activities do we challenge and  question in the way that Watt did?• His copier a good example of reinventing from  first principles
  • 21.                                                                               
  • 22. Where does Matthew Boulton fit into  all this?
  • 23. Where does Matthew Boulton fit into  all this?• Watt was struggling to develop his invention:  Boulton brought together the craft tradition of  Birmingham with factory production• Boulton had the vision of ubiquity and drove  Watt forward – ‘What I sell is Power’• The importance of the patent: opposite of open  access. But shows the importance of business  models. In 1775, a sound business model was just  as important as groundbreaking technology
  • 24. Where does Matthew Boulton fit into  all this? The Lunar Society: technology networking into science 
  • 25. Where does Matthew Boulton fit into  all this? The Marketing of Soho: turning new technology into a tourist attraction
  • 26. Lord Brougham on WattNow those who knew Mr Watt had to contemplate a man whose genius could create such an engine, and indulge in the most abstruse speculation of philosophy, and could at once pass from the most sublime researches of geology and physical astronomy, the formation of our globe, and the structure of the universe, to the manufacture of a needle or nail 
  • 27. The Lessons of Boulton and Watt• There is no distinction between technology,  theory and manufacture – they are all  seamlessly interconnected.• Innovation occurs wherever there is  speculation, debate and making. It is not  confined to the academy. More likely outside  the academy.• Making is a theoretical (or philosophical)  statement.