Tivoli business systems manager v2.1 end to-end business impact management sg246610

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  • 1. Front coverTivoli Business SystemsManager Version 2.1End-to-End Business Impact ManagementIn-depth product structure revealedand explainedDetailed implementation of bestpracticesIntegrated systemsmanagement solution Budi Darmawan Alessio D’Amico Cedric Foo Peter Glasmacher Stephen Nosbisch Samson Yiuibm.com/redbooks
  • 2. International Technical Support OrganizationTivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1End-to-End Business Impact ManagementApril 2003 SG24-6610-00
  • 3. Note: Before using this information and the product it supports, read the information in “Notices” on page xxiii.First Edition (April 2003)This edition applies to Version 2, Release 1 of IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager and IBMTivoli Business Systems Manager for z/OS (product number 5678-BSM).© Copyright International Business Machines Corporation 2003. All rights reserved.Note to U.S. Government Users Restricted Rights -- Use, duplication or disclosure restricted by GSA ADPSchedule Contract with IBM Corp.
  • 4. Contents Figures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxi Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxiii Trademarks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxiv Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxv The team that wrote this redbook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxv Become a published author . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .xxvii Comments welcome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxviiiPart 1. Concept and planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Chapter 1. Introduction to business systems management . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1.1 Business systems management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.2 Tivoli systems management product . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 1.3 IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.3.1 Business system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 1.3.2 Discovery processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 1.3.3 Event processing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 1.3.4 Views. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 1.4 Document organization and scope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 1.5 Lab environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Chapter 2. Components and functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 2.1 Product structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 2.2 Base services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 2.2.1 Components and data flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 2.2.2 Installation directory structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 2.2.3 Windows registry structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 2.2.4 Log files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 2.3 Distributed resource feeds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 2.3.1 Agent Listener . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 2.3.2 Common listener . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 2.4 Mainframe (z/OS) resource feeds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 2.4.1 OS/390 components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 2.4.2 Windows servers connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 2.4.3 Object registration process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60© Copyright IBM Corp. 2003. All rights reserved. iii
  • 5. 2.4.4 Bulk discovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 2.4.5 Command support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 2.5 History server, reporting, and health monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 2.5.1 History server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 2.5.2 The reporting system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 2.5.3 Health monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Chapter 3. Database structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 3.1 Microsoft SQL Server overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 3.2 The databases. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 3.3 Object implementation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 3.3.1 Important information sources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 3.3.2 Object structure implementation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 3.3.3 Business Systems implementation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 3.3.4 ROOT, BUSC, and LOBC objects. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 3.3.5 Object hierarchy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 3.4 Status propagation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 3.5 Agent listener resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 3.5.1 Class implementation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 3.5.2 AMS tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 3.6 Common listener resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 3.7 Menu and command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 3.7.1 Menu, menu item, and launcher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 3.7.2 z/OS subsystems command support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 3.7.3 Tivoli task support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Chapter 4. User interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 4.1 Java console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 4.2 Web console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 Chapter 5. Implementation planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129 5.1 Planning overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130 5.2 Personnel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130 5.3 Hardware specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132 5.4 Network and connectivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 5.5 Software level and prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 5.5.1 Planning for distributed systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 5.5.2 Planning for mainframe systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 5.6 Operators and users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138 5.7 Business System requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139 5.7.1 Business System View theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139 5.7.2 Business System View design concept. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139 5.7.3 Business System View structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140iv Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 6. Part 2. Distributed implementation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147 Chapter 6. Base services implementation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149 6.1 Hardware and software prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150 6.1.1 Hardware configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150 6.1.2 Software components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151 6.1.3 Hardware and software configuration for this book . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152 6.2 Prerequisite software components installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154 6.2.1 Operating system: Windows 2000 Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154 6.2.2 MKS Toolkit for Systems Administrators Version 7.5 or 8.0 . . . . . . 155 6.2.3 Windows Resource Kit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155 6.2.4 JDBC Driver: Microsoft SQL 2000 Driver for JDBC . . . . . . . . . . . . 155 6.2.5 Microsoft IIS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155 6.2.6 Microsoft SQL Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155 6.3 Database server installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176 6.4 Console and propagation server installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190 6.5 History server installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194 6.6 Health Monitor Server implementation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199 6.6.1 HMS Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199 6.6.2 Customization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202 6.6.3 Health Monitor Client implementation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208 Chapter 7. TEC components integration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209 7.1 Tivoli Enterprise Console overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210 7.2 Setting up the TEC connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211 7.2.1 Installing event enablement and the task server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211 7.2.2 Setting up the user ID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213 7.2.3 Updating the TEC event classes and rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217 7.2.4 Enabling TBSM agent listener. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 225 7.3 IBM Tivoli Monitoring modules integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226 7.4 Creating a generic component . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 230 7.5 Defining a component from DM monitors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 235 7.6 Troubleshooting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242 Chapter 8. IBM Tivoli Monitoring integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249 8.1 IBM Tivoli Monitoring integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250 8.2 Adapter installation and configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 252 8.2.1 Installing JRE 1.3.0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 252 8.2.2 Installing the TBSM adapter for ITM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254 8.2.3 TBSM adapter processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256 8.2.4 Configuring the IBM Tivoli Monitoring for 5.1.1 TBSM Adapter . . . 259 8.3 Using the TBSM adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 261 8.3.1 Discovery process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 261 8.3.2 Event forwarding to Tivoli Business Systems Manager . . . . . . . . . 264 Contents v
  • 7. 8.4 Tracing an event to the Common Listener . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 268 Chapter 9. IBM Tivoli NetView integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 279 9.1 What IBM Tivoli NetView is . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 280 9.2 NetView 7.1.3 installation and configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283 9.2.1 Installation prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283 9.2.2 Suggested configuration steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 284 9.3 Adapter installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 291 9.3.1 Installing the NetView part of the adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 292 9.3.2 Installing the TBSM part of the adapter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293 9.4 NetView adapter configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293 9.5 Using the adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 295 9.5.1 Bulk discovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 295 9.5.2 How NetView resources are handled . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 297 9.5.3 Launching NetView Web console from TBSM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303 9.6 Troubleshooting the environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305 9.6.1 TBSM adapter basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305 9.6.2 TBSM communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 307 9.6.3 Testing the launch functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 308 9.6.4 TBSM adapter log and trace files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 309 9.7 Extending the menus. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 311 9.7.1 Extending the NetView Web console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 312 9.7.2 Extending the TBSM Java console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 319Part 3. z/OS integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 329 Chapter 10. z/OS installation and configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 331 10.1 Source/390 implementation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 332 10.1.1 Pre-installation tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 332 10.1.2 Installing Source/390. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 333 10.1.3 Bulk discovery configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 337 10.1.4 Source/390 tuning considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 337 10.1.5 Source/390 security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 338 10.2 Setting up Tivoli NetView for z/OS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 338 10.2.1 Modify the NetView started task procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 339 10.2.2 Modify the DSIPARM members . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 339 10.2.3 Enable the PPI connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 339 10.2.4 Enable NETCONV connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 340 10.2.5 Enabling communication between NetView systems . . . . . . . . . . 341 10.2.6 Tuning considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 341 10.3 Implementing the Event Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 342 Chapter 11. z/OS data feeds and discovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 347 11.1 z/OS data feeds overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 348vi Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 8. 11.2 System Automation for OS/390 Version 2.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 349 11.2.1 Concept . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 349 11.2.2 Integration setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 350 11.2.3 Object discovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 351 11.3 Database 2 (DB2) for z/OS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 353 11.3.1 Integration setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 354 11.3.2 Object discovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 356 11.4 Information Management System (IMS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 357 11.4.1 Integration setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 357 11.4.2 Object discovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 360 11.5 CICSPlex System Manager Version 2.2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 361 11.5.1 Integration setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 361 11.5.2 Object discovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 370 11.6 Tivoli Workload Scheduler for z/OS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 372 11.6.1 Concept . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 372 11.6.2 Integration setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 373 11.6.3 Object discovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 376 11.7 Resource Object Data Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 376 11.7.1 Concept . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 377 11.7.2 Integration setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 377 11.7.3 Object discovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 379 11.8 Resource Measurement Facility (RMF). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 381 11.8.1 Concept . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 381 11.8.2 Integration setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 382 11.9 System Managed Storage (SMS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 385 11.9.1 Concept . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 385 11.9.2 Integration setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 385 11.10 DFSMS Hierarchical Storage Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 388 11.10.1 Concept . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 388 11.10.2 Integration setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 389 11.11 WebSphere HTTP Server for OS/390 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 391 11.11.1 Integration setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 391 11.11.2 Object discovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 392Part 4. Advanced configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 393 Chapter 12. Automatic Business System View creation . . . . . . . . . . . . . 395 12.1 Automatic Business System View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 396 12.1.1 Automatic Business Systems design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 396 12.1.2 Automatic Business Systems configuration file. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 397 12.1.3 Defining the Automatic Business System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 402 12.2 ABS usage example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 403 12.2.1 Manual creation of the business system view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 403 Contents vii
  • 9. 12.2.2 BSV creation tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 407 12.3 Distributed LOB rules to ABS migration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 414 12.3.1 Migration description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 414 12.3.2 Migration example. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 415 Chapter 13. Setting up roles and security. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 421 13.1 Resource security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 422 13.1.1 Protecting files and directories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 422 13.1.2 Protecting the registry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 426 13.1.3 Windows user ID and groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 429 13.2 Password protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 430 13.2.1 TBSM processes passwords. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 430 13.2.2 Microsoft SQL Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 432 13.2.3 Reporting system password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 433 13.3 TBSM command security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 433 13.4 TBSM operators and workspaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 434 Chapter 14. Maintenance and tuning issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 437 14.1 SQL Server Agent jobs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 438 14.1.1 z/OS-related jobs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 438 14.1.2 Distributed resources jobs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 440 14.1.3 Database maintenance jobs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 440 14.2 Database maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 445 14.2.1 Database statistic and check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 445 14.2.2 Database Maintenance Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 448 14.3 Microsoft SQL Server and Windows 2000 tuning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 458 14.3.1 Windows 2000 Advanced Server tuning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 458 14.3.2 Microsoft SQL Server 2000 tuning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 462 Chapter 15. Automatic problem ticketing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 465 15.1 Automatic problem ticketing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 466 15.2 Defining the auto ticketing rule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 467 15.3 Tivoli Information Management for z/OS integration overview . . . . . . . 469 15.4 Installation and configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 471 15.4.1 Enable problem management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 471 15.4.2 Extract and customize the input-output processor . . . . . . . . . . . . 474 15.4.3 Setting up the task server and Tivoli NetView for z/OS . . . . . . . . 475 15.4.4 Application customization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 477 15.5 Using the problem ticket interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 499 15.5.1 Manual problem ticket operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 499 15.5.2 Closing a problem ticket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 508 Chapter 16. High availability and failover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 513 16.1 Failover concept and terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 514viii Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 10. 16.2 Implementation of failover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 515 16.2.1 Prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 515 16.2.2 Installation and customization of failover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 516 16.2.3 Setup for z/OS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 520 16.3 Performing failover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 521 16.3.1 Enabling failover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 522 16.3.2 Enabling reverse failover. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 522 16.4 Limitations and discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 523 16.5 Troubleshooting tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 525 Chapter 17. Historical reporting with TEDW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 527 17.1 Tivoli Enterprise Data Warehouse overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 528 17.1.1 Tivoli Enterprise Data Warehouse concepts and components . . . 529 17.1.2 IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager integration . . . . . . . . . . . . 532 17.2 Installation and configuration for data warehouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 533 17.2.1 Warehouse integration pre-installation steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 533 17.2.2 Setting up the source ETL. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 534 17.3 Activating collection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 538 17.3.1 Changes on the TWH_CDW database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 539 17.3.2 Creating an ODBC connection to source database . . . . . . . . . . . 539 17.3.3 Defining authority to the Warehouse Sources and Targets . . . . . 543 17.3.4 Scheduling the source ETL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 548 17.3.5 Changing the source ETL status to Production. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 551 17.3.6 Running ETLs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 552Part 5. Appendixes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 553 Appendix A. Detailed process flow of services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 555 Appendix B. Sample files and scripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 557 The gemmfprod.sh script . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 558 High-level load sample . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 560 ASILoad_Highlevel.ksh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 560 ITSO_Highlevel - Sample high-level load source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 564 Appendix C. IBM Tivoli NetView additional information . . . . . . . . . . . . . 565 NetView adapter configuration files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 566 The nvid.conf file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 566 The topxlistener.properties file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 566 The topxtrapgate.conf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 569 TBSM adapter files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 571 Launch menu item add and delete script . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 572 NetView Web Server script 3beansalad.js . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 574 Contents ix
  • 11. Appendix D. Additional material . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 577 Locating the Web material . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 577 Using the Web material . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 577 System requirements for downloading the Web material . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578 How to use the Web material . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 578 Abbreviations and acronyms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 579 Related publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... ....... ...... . 583 IBM Redbooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... ....... ...... . 583 Other resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... ....... ...... . 583 Referenced Web sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... ....... ...... . 584 How to get IBM Redbooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... ....... ...... . 584 IBM Redbooks collections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... ....... ...... . 584 Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 585x Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 12. Figures 1-1 Tivoli software product pillars. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 1-2 Tivoli performance and availability solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1-3 TBSM console: propagation path. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 1-4 TBSM console: tree view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 1-5 TBSM console: Hyperview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 1-6 TBSM console: Table view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 1-7 TBSM console: Business impact view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 1-8 TBSM console: events view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 1-9 TBSM properties window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 1-10 TBSM Web console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 1-11 Network diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 2-1 IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager product structure . . . . . . . . . . . 26 2-2 TBSM flowchart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 2-3 IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager Windows directory structure . . 39 2-4 Registry tree. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 2-5 Hierarchical setting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 2-6 Database setting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 2-7 Flowchart for distributed system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 2-8 AMS description files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 2-9 Common listener connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 2-10 z/OS components and feeds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 2-11 TBSM data server startup log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 2-12 TBSM object server startup log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 2-13 TBSM object pump startup log. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 2-14 Connection from z/OS to TBSM servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 2-15 Initial conversation for TBSM connection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 2-16 Sample message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 2-17 Queue file contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 2-18 The Resources view after the high-level object load . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 2-19 Parameters of the GTMAOPE0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 2-20 MVSIPListener registry definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 2-21 Command aliases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 2-22 History server setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 2-23 Microsoft IIS virtual directories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 2-24 Reporting system invocation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 2-25 Object Event Report Selection screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 2-26 A generated report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 2-27 Health monitor client window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74© Copyright IBM Corp. 2003. All rights reserved. xi
  • 13. 2-28 Registry Editor for Health Monitoring profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 3-1 Microsoft SQL Server Enterprise Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 3-2 Part of TBSM containment hierarchy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 3-3 TBSM inheritance hierarchy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 3-4 The propagation concept . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 3-5 Propagation algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 3-6 GEM object classes in TBSM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 3-7 Tables for CID G02H . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 3-8 GEMLookupCID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 3-9 GEM_IDlookup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 3-10 GEM_DMtoCID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 3-11 CL_Registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 3-12 Common listener auto placement table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 3-13 CL_Severities content . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 3-14 Default context menu for DB2InstanceManager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 3-15 Context menu processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 3-16 Running the asisp_definemenuitem. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 3-17 Invoke MVS D A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 3-18 Task setting window. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 3-19 Tivoli NetView for z/OS prompt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 3-20 Task Monitor result window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 3-21 Context menu for DIRCDrv . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 3-22 Execution result for DIRCDrv . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 4-1 Java console structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 4-2 IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager icon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 4-3 IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager sign-on dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 4-4 Welcome screen for IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager. . . . . . . . 115 4-5 Primary Menu for Super Administrator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 4-6 Expanded console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 4-7 Property page of a DB2InstanceManager object . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 4-8 Expanded console in debug mode. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 4-9 Sign on to the IBM Console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 4-10 Welcome screen of the Web console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 4-11 Primary options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 4-12 User profile. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124 4-13 User roles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 4-14 TBSM Sign On screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 4-15 Business System View. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127 4-16 All Resources View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128 5-1 Flat BSV for Remote Banking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 5-2 Hierarchical BSV for Remote Banking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142 5-3 Inverted hierarchy BSV for Remote Banking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143 5-4 Grouped resource BSV for Remote Banking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144xii Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 14. 6-1 InstallShield Welcome dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1576-2 Computer Name dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1576-3 Installation Selection dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1586-4 User Information dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1596-5 Software License Agreement dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1596-6 Installation Definition dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1606-7 Instance Name dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1616-8 Setup Type dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1626-9 Choose Folder dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1636-10 Select Components dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1636-11 Services Account dialog. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1646-12 Authentication Mode dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1656-13 Collation Settings dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1666-14 Network Libraries dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1676-15 Start Copying Files dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1686-16 Choose Licensing Mode dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1696-17 SQL Server Enterprise Manager view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1706-18 SQL Server Security options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1706-19 Change password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1716-20 Password confirmation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1716-21 Log on to SQL Query Analyzer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1736-22 Current Connection Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1736-23 Connection Properties options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1746-24 Opening the Options menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1756-25 Tools Options dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1766-26 Language selection dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1776-27 System File Update welcome screen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1776-28 Temporary directory selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1786-29 System File Upgrade complete . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1796-30 Welcome dialog for TBSM installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1806-31 License agreement dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1806-32 Setup path selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1816-33 Setup type selection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1826-34 Select Components for database server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1836-35 Enter Information for SQL database server host name . . . . . . . . . . . . 1846-36 Database parameters dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1856-37 Database upgrade dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1866-38 Start copying files dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1876-39 Setup Complete dialog. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1876-40 Extract seed database files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1886-41 Changes in AttachDatabases.sql. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1896-42 Services setting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1906-43 Component selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191 Figures xiii
  • 15. 6-44 Create local groups dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192 6-45 JDBC driver selection dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192 6-46 Installation options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193 6-47 Services list for console and propagation server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194 6-48 TBSM operators groups. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194 6-49 History Server component selection dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195 6-50 Creating a new database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196 6-51 History database properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197 6-52 Pop-up message for historyserversetup.ksh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197 6-53 Health Monitor Server component selection dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200 6-54 Health Monitor Server host name dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201 6-55 Health Monitor Server parameters dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202 6-56 Open the Properties dialog for Health Monitor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203 6-57 Health Monitor Log On tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204 6-58 Health monitor profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205 6-59 Default services definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206 6-60 Settings for Common Listener . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207 6-61 MonitoredQueueTable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208 7-1 Event flow for IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager integration . . . . 210 7-2 Install Product window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212 7-3 Services window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213 7-4 Local Security Settings window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214 7-5 Security setting dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215 7-6 Tivoli BSM Event Enablement Properties window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216 7-7 TME Desktop of Administrator window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217 7-8 Event Server Rule Bases window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221 7-9 Import Into Rule Base window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222 7-10 TBSM console: All Resources - Descendents window . . . . . . . . . . . . 229 7-11 GEMLookupCID content . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231 7-12 New generic test object created. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 234 7-13 Properties window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 235 7-14 Flow diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237 7-15 Event Viewer: Group All - All events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 238 7-16 All Resources - Descendents window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239 7-17 Note editor for closing an event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 240 8-1 IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager for ITM diagram . . . . . . . . . . . 251 8-2 Installing JRE 1.3.0 via GUI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253 8-3 Install Product window, ITM adapter for TBSM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255 8-4 Install Options window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256 8-5 IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager console window . . . . . . . . . . . 263 8-6 Instrumentation mapping to enterprise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 264 8-7 Profile Properties window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265 8-8 Indications and Actions window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 266xiv Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 16. 8-9 All Resources - Descendants window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2678-10 Windows 2000 - Properties window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2688-11 SQL Window: Query-ibmtiv5.Object.sa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2758-12 SQL Window: Query-ibmtiv5.object.sa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2769-1 NetView’s main capabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2809-2 The NetView Web console. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2829-3 Invoking Web console Security from nvsetup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2869-4 The Web Console Security dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2879-5 The Add User dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2879-6 The NetView Web Console download page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2889-7 Changing the default path for the NetView Web Console . . . . . . . . . . 2899-8 Web Console login dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2909-9 Open a map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2919-10 The TBSM Bulk Upload entry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2969-11 NetViews bulk upload message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2979-12 The initial NetView Map contents. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2989-13 Initial NetView resources uploaded to TBSM. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2999-14 Hyperview view of NetView resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3009-15 The final discovery in NetView . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3019-16 The corresponding TBSM hierarchy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3029-17 Various network views in TBSM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3039-18 TBSMs Launch submenu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3049-19 The Web Console Launch results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3059-20 Launch error message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3089-21 The Roles dialog with the new menu entry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3179-22 Parsing error . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3179-23 NetView Web console and the new menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3189-24 The resulting output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3199-25 The Launch submenu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3209-26 NetView Console launch process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3219-27 3beansalad.js display. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3239-28 The new menu entry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3269-29 The Web console display launched by the new menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32710-1 Property page of OS object to enable upload . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34411-1 Feeds for z/OS systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34811-2 System Automation for OS/390 2.1 connection to TBSM . . . . . . . . . . 35011-3 Subsystem objects from System Automation for OS/390 . . . . . . . . . . 35311-4 DB2 topology display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35711-5 IMS descendants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36111-6 CPSM main panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36311-7 View selection panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36311-8 RTASPEC panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36411-9 Real time analysis specification update . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 364 Figures xv
  • 17. 11-10 Action definition selection panel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 365 11-11 Creating TBSMA1 action definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 366 11-12 Updated action definition list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 366 11-13 CICSPlex System Manager panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 367 11-14 CPSM primary option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 368 11-15 BATCHREP display panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 368 11-16 BATCHREP submission panel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 369 11-17 Property of a CICSPlex definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 370 11-18 Initiating CICSPlex SM discovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 371 11-19 CICSPlex SM CICS Topology display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 372 11-20 Detailed operation information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 374 11-21 Inserting SNA APPN network object . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 378 11-22 Setting the NetID name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 379 11-23 Setting the OS path . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 379 11-24 SNA topology view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 381 11-25 Event flow and component descriptions for TBSM/RMF integration . . 382 11-26 Invoking RMF registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 384 11-27 SMS information flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 385 11-28 Register monitoring interval for SMS resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 387 11-29 Disk configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 388 11-30 Creating an HSM object . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 389 11-31 HSM creation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 390 11-32 DFSMShsm topology view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 391 11-33 HTTP Server objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 392 12-1 ABS processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 396 12-2 Sample business system view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 403 12-3 Database tables with the loaded ABS configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 405 12-4 ITSO RESOURCES business system view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 406 12-5 ABSMain window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408 12-6 First BSV ITSO Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 409 12-7 BSV tree for the example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 410 12-8 Adding Production OS filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 411 12-9 Defining condition for production OS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 412 12-10 Condition for Production DB2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 413 12-11 Distributed Line of Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 415 12-12 GEM_InstFiltering table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 415 12-13 Table GEM_Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 419 13-1 Changing TivoliManager directory’s property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 423 13-2 Sharing property for the TivoliManager directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 424 13-3 Security property of TivoliManager directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 425 13-4 Advanced security setting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 426 13-5 Protecting TBSM registry key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 427 13-6 TBSM registry permissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 428xvi Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 18. 13-7 Advanced permissions setting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42913-8 Automatic logon for Event Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43113-9 Historical database users. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43313-10 Extract of the MenuItem table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43413-11 Saving a workspace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43513-12 Opening a workspace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43513-13 Editing a workspace permission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43614-1 Cleanup Old Log Files job window. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44114-2 Delete Old MVS Upload Output Files window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44314-3 Cleanup Old DB Queues window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44514-4 Update ObjectEvents stats job wIndow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44614-5 Update Object Stats job wIndow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44714-6 Database Maintenance Plan creation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44814-7 Database Maintenance Plan Wizard: Welcome. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44914-8 Database Maintenance Plan Wizard: Select Databases . . . . . . . . . . . 45014-9 Database Maintenance Plan Wizard: Data Optimization settings . . . . 45114-10 Database Maintenance Plan Wizard: Database Integrity Check . . . . . 45214-11 Database Maintenance Plan Wizard: Backup settings . . . . . . . . . . . . 45314-12 Database Maintenance Plan Wizard: Backup Disk Directory settings . 45414-13 Database Maintenance Plan Wizard: Transaction Log Backup settings45514-14 Database Maintenance Plan Wizard: Reports to Generate . . . . . . . . . 45614-15 Database Maintenance Plan Wizard: Maintenance Plan History. . . . . 45714-16 Database Maintenance Plan Wizard summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45814-17 Windows 2000 System Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45914-18 Windows2000 Performance Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45914-19 Windows 2000 Local Area Connection Properties. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46014-20 Windows 2000 File and Printers Sharing Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46114-21 SQL Server Properties Memory window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46214-22 SQL Server Properties Processor window. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46315-1 Problem and change management interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46615-2 Data flow: TBSM operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47015-3 TBSM event ID assisted entry panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47815-4 IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager class ID assisted entry panel . 47915-5 Tivoli Information Management for z/OS s-word display . . . . . . . . . . . 48015-6 Tivoli Information Management for z/OS p-word display . . . . . . . . . . . 48015-7 Users to notify . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48115-8 Deleting of the BRANCH control line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48215-9 Change DEFAULT to MVS user ID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48315-10 Control panel update . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48515-11 Function line summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48615-12 First line option 1: Control flow processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48715-13 First line oOption 2: Data collection processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48815-14 First line option 3: Test data processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 488 Figures xvii
  • 19. 15-15 Second line option 1: Control flow processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 489 15-16 Second line option 2: Data collection processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 490 15-17 Second line option 3: Test data processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 490 15-18 Third line option 1: Control flow processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 491 15-19 Third line option 2: Data collection processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 492 15-20 Third line option 3: Test data processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 492 15-21 Fourth line option 1: Control flow processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 493 15-22 Fourth line option 2: Data collection processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 494 15-23 Fourth line option 3: Test data processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 494 15-24 Fifth line option 1: Control flow processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 495 15-25 Fifth line option 2: Data collection processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 496 15-26 Fifth line option 3:Test data processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 496 15-27 Panel list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 497 15-28 List of modified panels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 498 15-29 Panel Copy specification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 498 15-30 Problem ticket creation dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500 15-31 Authentication dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 501 15-32 Problem ticket created . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 501 15-33 Problem ticket icon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 502 15-34 Tivoli Information Management for z/OS with the problem ticket. . . . . 503 15-35 Searching for a problem ticket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 504 15-36 Problem ticket list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 505 15-37 Problem ticket window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 506 15-38 Problem ticket updated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 507 15-39 Creating new problem ticket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 508 15-40 Searching Tivoli Information Management for ticket no 00000009 . . . 509 15-41 Search result for ticket no 00000009 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 509 15-42 Closing problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 510 15-43 Closing problem dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 511 17-1 A typical Tivoli Enterprise Data Warehouse environment . . . . . . . . . . 529 17-2 IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager warehouse component . . . . . 532 17-3 Installation type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 535 17-4 Path to the installation media for the GTM. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 536 17-5 IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager program installation . . . . . . . . 537 17-6 IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager ETL Installation summary . . . 538 17-7 System DSN tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 540 17-8 Selecting the data source for ODBC System DSN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 541 17-9 SQL Server data source settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 541 17-10 User authentication for the new data source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 542 17-11 Other options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 542 17-12 Completing the data source definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 543 17-13 IBM Tivoli Monitoring Version 5.1.1 Generic ETL1 Sources . . . . . . . . 544 17-14 GTM_OBJECT_Source user ID information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 545xviii Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 20. 17-15 IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager ETL target . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54617-16 GTM_TWH_CDW_Target user ID information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54717-17 GTM_c05_LOBState_Process flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54817-18 Schedule GTM_c05_s010_Load_LOBStage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54917-19 Schedule configuration for GTM_c05_s010_Load_LOBStage . . . . . . 55017-20 Promoting scheduled processes to Production status . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55117-21 Work in Progress window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 552A-1 Detailed services diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 556 Figures xix
  • 21. xx Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 22. Tables 1-1 Reading paths . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 1-2 Operating system and software detail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 2-1 IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager services by component . . . . . . 31 2-2 TBSM services log files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 2-3 AMS types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 2-4 TEC exits for event forwarding. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 5-1 List of mainframe information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 5-2 Subsystem naming convention . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 5-3 IMS subsystems checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 5-4 DB2 subsystems checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 5-5 CICS subsystems checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138 5-6 Pro and cons of BSVs creation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 6-1 Required hardware configuration for TBSM. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151 6-2 TBSM server configuration running in the lab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152 6-3 Prerequisite software components installed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153 6-4 Database attributes for reporting system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199 7-1 IBM Tivoli Monitoring tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229 9-1 nvid keywords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 294 10-1 z/OS data sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 333 10-2 Modification to IBM Tivoli NetView for z/OS startup procedure . . . . . . 339 11-1 TBSM batch jobs for SMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 386 12-1 Distributed rules not supported by the migration script . . . . . . . . . . . . 416 14-1 z/OS Resources SQL jobs: suggested settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 438 14-2 Distributed Resources Jobs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 440 14-3 Database Maintenance Jobs suggested settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 440 14-4 Queues tables cleaned up by the Cleanup Old DB Queue job . . . . . . 444 15-1 Problem management parameter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 471 15-2 Create a problem ticket . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 499© Copyright IBM Corp. 2003. All rights reserved. xxi
  • 23. xxii Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 24. NoticesThis information was developed for products and services offered in the U.S.A.IBM may not offer the products, services, or features discussed in this document in other countries. Consultyour local IBM representative for information on the products and services currently available in your area.Any reference to an IBM product, program, or service is not intended to state or imply that only that IBMproduct, program, or service may be used. Any functionally equivalent product, program, or service thatdoes not infringe any IBM intellectual property right may be used instead. However, it is the usersresponsibility to evaluate and verify the operation of any non-IBM product, program, or service.IBM may have patents or pending patent applications covering subject matter described in this document.The furnishing of this document does not give you any license to these patents. You can send licenseinquiries, in writing, to:IBM Director of Licensing, IBM Corporation, North Castle Drive Armonk, NY 10504-1785 U.S.A.The following paragraph does not apply to the United Kingdom or any other country where suchprovisions are inconsistent with local law: INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATIONPROVIDES THIS PUBLICATION "AS IS" WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS ORIMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF NON-INFRINGEMENT,MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Some states do not allow disclaimerof express or implied warranties in certain transactions, therefore, this statement may not apply to you.This information could include technical inaccuracies or typographical errors. Changes are periodically madeto the information herein; these changes will be incorporated in new editions of the publication. IBM maymake improvements and/or changes in the product(s) and/or the program(s) described in this publication atany time without notice.Any references in this information to non-IBM Web sites are provided for convenience only and do not in anymanner serve as an endorsement of those Web sites. The materials at those Web sites are not part of thematerials for this IBM product and use of those Web sites is at your own risk.IBM may use or distribute any of the information you supply in any way it believes appropriate withoutincurring any obligation to you.Information concerning non-IBM products was obtained from the suppliers of those products, their publishedannouncements or other publicly available sources. IBM has not tested those products and cannot confirmthe accuracy of performance, compatibility or any other claims related to non-IBM products. Questions onthe capabilities of non-IBM products should be addressed to the suppliers of those products.This information contains examples of data and reports used in daily business operations. To illustrate themas completely as possible, the examples include the names of individuals, companies, brands, and products.All of these names are fictitious and any similarity to the names and addresses used by an actual businessenterprise is entirely coincidental.COPYRIGHT LICENSE:This information contains sample application programs in source language, which illustrates programmingtechniques on various operating platforms. You may copy, modify, and distribute these sample programs inany form without payment to IBM, for the purposes of developing, using, marketing or distributing applicationprograms conforming to the application programming interface for the operating platform for which thesample programs are written. These examples have not been thoroughly tested under all conditions. IBM,therefore, cannot guarantee or imply reliability, serviceability, or function of these programs. You may copy,modify, and distribute these sample programs in any form without payment to IBM for the purposes ofdeveloping, using, marketing, or distributing application programs conforming to IBMs applicationprogramming interfaces.© Copyright IBM Corp. 2003. All rights reserved. xxiii
  • 25. TrademarksThe following terms are trademarks of the International Business Machines Corporation in the United States,other countries, or both: AIX® Informix® RMF™ CICS® Lotus® Tivoli® CICSPlex® MVS™ Tivoli Enterprise™ Database 2™ NetView® Tivoli Enterprise Console® DB2® Notes® Tivoli Management DFS™ OS/2® Environment® DFSMShsm™ OS/390® TME® Domino™ OS/400® TME 10™ IBM® RACF® VTAM® IBM.COM™ Redbooks™ WebSphere® IMS™ Redbooks (logo)™ z/OS™The following terms are trademarks of other companies:ActionMedia, LANDesk, MMX, Pentium and ProShare are trademarks of Intel Corporation in the UnitedStates, other countries, or both.Microsoft, Windows, Windows NT, and the Windows logo are trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in theUnited States, other countries, or both.Java and all Java-based trademarks and logos are trademarks or registered trademarks of SunMicrosystems, Inc. in the United States, other countries, or both.C-bus is a trademark of Corollary, Inc. in the United States, other countries, or both.UNIX is a registered trademark of The Open Group in the United States and other countries.SET, SET Secure Electronic Transaction, and the SET Logo are trademarks owned by SET SecureElectronic Transaction LLC.Other company, product, and service names may be trademarks or service marks of others.xxiv Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 26. Preface This IBM® Redbook gives a broad understanding of the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager architecture and internals. The in-depth discussion covers the product’s inner workings and includes log files to illustrate the processing of its various components. IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager is designed to display all aspects of the enterprise’s IT system as they affect the users’ business systems. This book enables easy implementation of IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager in distributed environments. Procedures are illustrated with examples of the installation and configuration process to explain the deployment of IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager into a customer’s environment. It also covers the implementation of IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager in z/OS™ with most of its major interfaces. IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager can monitor all major IBM subsystems in z/OS including IMS™, DB2®, CICS®, storage, and Web solutions. A book about concepts and implementation would not be complete without a comprehensive discussion about using, maintaining, and troubleshooting the system. We devote several sections to these topics.The team that wrote this redbook This redbook was produced by a team of specialists from around the world working at the International Technical Support Organization, Austin Center. Budi Darmawan is a Project Leader at the International Technical Support Organization, Austin Center. He writes extensively and teaches IBM classes worldwide on all areas of systems management, database systems, and business intelligence. Before joining the ITSO in 1999, Budi worked in Integrated Solution Services for IBM Indonesia as lead solution architect and implementer. His current interests are in performance and availability and business systems management. Alessio D’Amico works as a Technical Consulting IT Specialist for the EMEA South Region TBSM services team. He joined IBM in 1998 as a Tivoli® Software Engineer covering various positions including level 3 customer support and development. He moved to the TBSM services team in 2001.© Copyright IBM Corp. 2003. All rights reserved. xxv
  • 27. Cedric Foo works as a Technical Consulting IT Specialist for Tivoli Software at IBM United Kingdom. Before joining the Pan EMEA TBSM Services Team two and a half years ago, Cedric worked as an OS/390® specialist in the ITS North Region Enterprise Assist Technical Support team for more than two years. He has more than 22 years of IT experience, from small, specialized subsystems to large mainframe complexes. Peter Glasmacher is a certified Systems Management Expert professional from Dortmund, Germany. After joining IBM in 1973, he worked in various positions including support, development, and services covering multiple OS platforms and networking architectures. Currently, he works as a consulting IT specialist for the Integrated Technology Services branch of IBM Global Services, concentrating on infrastructure and security issues. He has more than 15 years of experience in the network and systems management areas. For the past eight years, he concentrated on architectural work and the design of network and systems management solutions in large customer environments. Since 1983, he has written extensively on workstation-related issues, both external and internal. He has authored or co-authored a number of Redbooks covering network and systems management topics. Stephen Nosbisch is a Senior IT Specialist from Boulder, Colorado. His current assignment includes developing architectual design solutions for enterprise wide automation platforms within SDC-West for both IBM internal and commercial accounts. He has more than 15 years of experience in the network and systems management areas. For the past two years he has focused heavily on business systems management solutions. Samson Yiu is a Senior IT Specialist working with the IBM Support Centre in Australia. He holds a degree in Computer and Mathematical Sciences as well as professional certification as an MCP+Internet, MCSE, Tivoli Enterprise™ Consultant, Citrix, and IBM Certified Systems Expert. He has worked for IBM Australia for 10 years, primarily in software defect support, and is a senior member of the Tivoli PACO support team. His time is spent exclusively supporting Tivoli products. This is the fifth book to which he has contributed.xxvi Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 28. Thanks to the following people for their contributions to this project: Betsy Thaggard International Technical Support Organization, Austin Center Pam Geiger, Mike Odom IBM Tivoli Software Group Jessie Zhang, Vivian Roberts IBM AustraliaBecome a published author Join us for a two- to six-week residency program! Help write an IBM Redbook dealing with specific products or solutions, while getting hands-on experience with leading-edge technologies. Youll team with IBM technical professionals, Business Partners and/or customers. Preface xxvii
  • 29. Your efforts will help increase product acceptance and customer satisfaction. As a bonus, youll develop a network of contacts in IBM development labs, and increase your productivity and marketability. Find out more about the residency program, browse the residency index, and apply online at: ibm.com/redbooks/residencies.htmlComments welcome Your comments are important to us! We want our Redbooks to be as helpful as possible. Send us your comments about this or other Redbooks in one of the following ways: Use the Contact us Review Redbook form found online at: ibm.com/redbooks Send your comments in an Internet note to: redbook@us.ibm.com Mail your comments to: IBM Corporation, International Technical Support Organization Dept. 0SJB Building 003 Internal Zip 2834 11400 Burnet Road Austin, Texas 78758-3493xxviii Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 30. Part 1Part 1 Concept and planning Part 1 provides some background information about and discusses the concept and planning information for IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager. The chapters are: Chapter 1, “Introduction to business systems management,” on page 3 discusses background information and the environment setup that we used for the project. This chapter also provides a guide for using this redbook. Chapter 2, “Components and functions,” on page 25 explains in-depth the components and functions of IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager. Chapter 3, “Database structure,” on page 77 goes into detail about how the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager database is organized. Here we also present some component-specific extensions of the database, such as Common Listener, TEC interface, and the Menu system.© Copyright IBM Corp. 2003. All rights reserved. 1
  • 31. Chapter 4, “User interface,” on page 113 discusses both available user interfaces for IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager: the Java console and the Web console. Chapter 5, “Implementation planning,” on page 129 explains information that you must prepare and understand before starting IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager implementation.2 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 32. 1 Chapter 1. Introduction to business systems management This chapter presents some basic information about business systems management with IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager and introduces the rest of the book with the description of the environment that we use in examples. The sections are: 1.1, “Business systems management” on page 4 explains the value of business systems management. 1.2, “Tivoli systems management product” on page 5 describes the Tivoli systems management product structure. 1.3, “IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager” on page 7 explains the features of IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager. 1.4, “Document organization and scope” on page 20 shows how this book is organized and provides some suggestions for using it effectively. 1.5, “Lab environment” on page 22 discusses the setup that we use in the examples.© Copyright IBM Corp. 2003. All rights reserved. 3
  • 33. 1.1 Business systems management Over the past 20 years we have seen a dramatic increase in complexity in the variety of computer systems and software used to run a business. Gone are the days when a computer system was isolated and used for the single purpose of word processing or producing a spreadsheet. Now we have multiple systems, such as a cluster of database servers, providing a single service, or multiple services provided by a single machine such as a mainframe. Most often, these computers are all networked to form a single, very complex enterprise. The IT departments that maintain these computers specialize in such infrastructures and have an extensive understanding of how these machines work and how to fix the technology when it breaks. However, as the environment becomes more complex, business users also want to understand the health of the infrastructure and the IT environment for their particular functions. Each sector of the business may have its own opinion about which machines or resources are most important. All need to understand the state of their operation so they can proactively manage their resources. The IT department may understand that all resources are important, but most likely would not know the overall impact of each of these resources in the business sense. When multiple resources fail at one time, they may need to prioritize repairs, which means understanding the impact of each single resource on the enterprise’s operations. These requirements from both the business and the IT department can be addressed together: Business users can see the resources that they are using and how they affect their function, and IT personnel can use a reversed model to see which function from the business user is affected by the resources. To be able to perform this function, the system must coordinate and collect the status of all IT resources from the different parts of the enterprise using various systems management tools. It also must be able to make an abstraction of the entire business structure that incorporates the IT resources. It also needs interfaces to other parts of the business, such as problem and change management. We will see how these business and IT needs can be met.4 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 34. 1.2 Tivoli systems management product Tivoli, as part of the IBM Software group, provides IT resource management software. The complete systems management approach from Tivoli is grouped into four pillars, as shown in Figure 1-1. Tivoli Mgmt Solution Tivoli Mgmt Solution Business Systems Management Business Systems Management Performance Configuration and and Storage Security Availability Operations Monitoring Centralized Storage Access Control Management Management Analysis Service Storage Area Indentity Central Delivery Network Management Console Management Web Management Data Risk Reporting Protection Management Pervasive Management Disaster Recovery Common Infrastructure/Services Figure 1-1 Tivoli software product pillars Underlying the Tivoli solution set is a group of common services and an infrastructure that provides consistency across Tivoli management applications and enables integration. Within the Tivoli product family, specific solutions target four primary disciplines of systems management: Performance and Availability, Configuration and Operation, Storage Management, and Security. Products within each of these areas have been made available over the years and, through generations of enhancements, have become accepted solutions in enterprises around the world. With these core capabilities in place, IBM has been able to focus on building applications that take advantage of these pillars to provide true business systems management solutions. With this end-to-end set of solutions built on a common foundation, enterprises can manage the ever-increasing complexity of their IT infrastructures with reduced staff and increasing efficiency. Chapter 1. Introduction to business systems management 5
  • 35. In the performance and availability area, products are structured as shown in Figure 1-2. Real time Management Predictive Management Business Impact Management IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager IBM Tivoli IBM Tivoli Service Level Web Site Event Correlation and Automation Analyzer Advisor IBM Tivoli IBM Tivoli NetView Enterprise Console Monitor Systems and Applications IBM Tivoli Enterprise Data Warehouse IBM Tivoli Monitoring Figure 1-2 Tivoli performance and availability solutions The Tivoli performance and availability portfolio is an integrated family of products that span Web, client-server, and host environments and are designed to provide a comprehensive and scalable solution for centralized management of e-business operations. Tivoli can simplify performance and availability management by consolidating and integrating products into three independent layers that offer three distinct types of value, yet provide superior management capabilities when used together. All offerings are designed to help provide out-of-the-box value and rapid return on investment, while minimizing total cost of ownership through high quality and comprehensive functionality. Tivoli simplifies autonomic prevention and recovery of IT problems at their source with out-of-the-box IBM best practices in the IBM Tivoli Monitoring products (yellow layer). Event correlation and automation products (green layer) provide centralized autonomic prevention and recovery of IT problems that span multiple resources. By providing better root-cause analysis and automated responses to identified problems, these products can help you: Eliminate the cost of downtime6 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 36. Reduce personnel costs Improve your return on IT investments IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager is a focal-point monitoring solution that provides you with a business view of your IT environment. In the next section we cover how it achieves these goals. Discussion in this redbook focuses on IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager and its integration interface to other IBM performance and availability products.1.3 IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager is an enterprise management product that monitors the data processing resources that are critical to a business application. (We sometimes will refer to it as TBSM, mainly in captions and figures.) It enables end-to-end monitoring of systems, subsystems, applications, and other resources in your enterprise, from OS/390 and z/OS systems to distributed systems. IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager provides your operations with a view of the system components as they relate to your overall business. We use IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager to: Construct monitoring views that reflect the enterprise’s current applications and business systems, which can contain a complex mixture of system resources across the entire enterprise. Enable real-time monitoring. Support existing Tivoli Global Enterprise Manager instrumentation, Tivoli Distributed Monitoring, IBM Tivoli Monitoring, and IBM Tivoli Enterprise Console®. Provide an open archtecture to enable third-party product integration. Manage business system components on a variety of platforms. Provide trend-analysis data for Tivoli Enterprise Data Warehouse. Enable effective operation of your entire enterprise. After resources are defined to or discovered by IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager, they are registered with IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager, and the information is stored in an SQL database. You can access the database using a GUI-based console. IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager monitors for state changes that occur in the various resources within your enterprise. An event management facility helps you determine and troubleshoot system problems that can affect the availability of applications and systems. By applying Chapter 1. Introduction to business systems management 7
  • 37. rules to events and data collected from various sources, even when business systems span several platforms, IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager enables you to graphically monitor and control the interconnected business components and operating system resources. Some new concepts are pertinent to understanding the operation of IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager: Business system Discovery Processing Event Processing Views1.3.1 Business system A business system is a group of diverse but interdependent applications and other system resources that interact to accomplish specific business functions. A business system can contain applications or other resources that run on a variety of platforms, including host, distributed, and network environments. For example, a banking business system designed to support transactions over the Web typically includes a Web server running outside the company’s intranet that is connected directly to the Internet and a firewall that provides secure connectivity to a machine running a custom business component, such as loan processing. The loan processing business component usually runs on a distributed platform and interfaces to business components running on a host computer. The host handles all bank transactions. This business system presents challenges to a system manager because it crosses the typically isolated environments of host and distributed systems. Another example of a business system is an e-mail system. E-mail business systems include all instances of e-mail business components that are being used in your network. You might have a mix of Lotus® Notes®® servers and clients, POP mail or Microsoft® Exchange servers and clients, and other e-mail business components. An e-mail business system includes definitions that tell whether each of its entities is a server, a client, or both. It also includes definitions of the monitors that collect status information for each component in the business system, as well as definitions of the relationships between the components in the business system. IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager enables you to use an automated approach for creating business systems. Using commands provided in IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager results in faster implementation and completeness8 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 38. of the business views. When the configuration is completed, the automatically created Business System View continues to monitor the system for the creation of new resources and automatically adds them to the view. In Chapter 12, “Automatic Business System View creation” on page 395, we will cover the creation. Note: In previous versions of IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager this was known as a line of business (LOB) view.1.3.2 Discovery processing IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager monitors resources for state changes and performance characteristics that indicate availability. However, before you can monitor resources in your enterprise, the resources must be discovered and registered in the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager database, a process that varies depending on the data source. The process for resources monitored by OS/390 involves running batch jobs that detect the configuration of your resources and update the database. Resources discovered through the Tivoli Enterprise Console require that the classes first be defined in the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager database. The resources are then created dynamically as events are received from the Tivoli Enterprise Console. Resources discovered through the common listener interface are dynamically populated through bulk and delta discovery transactions. IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager has three discovery processes for z/OS objects: Pre-discovery: Batch jobs are run initially when, or before, IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager is installed and configured. Rediscovery: Batch jobs can be customized and run on a scheduled basis to gather updated information about resources in your enterprise. Auto-discovery: Programs automatically detect updates, resulting in updates to the database. The identification or discovery process uses various data sources to initially populate resources in the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager database. The z/OS process involves a series of batch functions that create a sequential file, which is then forwarded to the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager servers. The data is then processed and stored in the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager database. The discovered resources are imported into IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager in a process called resource registration. Chapter 1. Introduction to business systems management 9
  • 39. IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager has two methods for discovering distributed resources. Rules can be added to the IBM Tivoli Enterprise Console to forward events to IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager database using the agent listener. The first event from a resource triggers the creation of the resource in the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager database. The common listener provides bulk and delta transactions. Bulk transactions are a snapshot of the instrumented environment. Bulk transactions identify which resources exist, resources that have changed since the last bulk transaction, the associations between resources, and resources that no longer exist since the last bulk transaction. The IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager database is populated with the information in the bulk transaction. The delta transaction updates the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager database as new resources are discovered. We will see various examples of the usage of the discovery process for different products throughout the book.1.3.3 Event processing IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager consolidates events from a wide range of IBM and independent system vendor products. Event processing involves capturing specific events and routing them to the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager server. The events result in updates to the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager database, which are then displayed on the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager console. Events also can trigger the discovery of resources. IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager has two event types: messages and exceptions. A fundamental principle of an effective centralized command center is to make alerts meaningful. The lights that indicate problems of greater or lesser severity must reflect the context in which they appear. IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager introduces two concepts in managing this problem: correlated priorities and alert ownership. Correlated priorities is a mechanism in selecting an object priority such that it will affect the alert status of a resource that is on a higher hierarchy. Taking ownership of an alert changes the tagged object icon from alert to Ownership status. Taking ownership also acts as a contract of problem acceptance. The username is automatically recorded in a note, which allows narrative action information to be recorded, viewed, and played back for reviews. Because all clients are updated instantly when ownership is taken, other members of the command center team and department users with special Business System Views (BSVs) can see that someone is responding to an alert. Integration with the Tivoli Framework products enable the state changes in products such as TEC to reflect a coherent view of the enterprise.10 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 40. Filtering is a powerful feature for building a BSV by providing ad-hoc selectioncriteria, such as object type, name, and alert state. This enables the commandcenter staff to quickly create a custom view to closely monitor a collection ofobjects showing recent trouble conditions. Filtering also allows representations ofthe same object contained in different BSVs to filter events differently, thereforeallowing you to be notified only on events that pertain to you.IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager monitors resources for state changes andthe performance characteristics that reflect their availability. These resources arerepresented by IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager objects in the SQLdatabase. Actions on an object, such as an alert notification and the propagationof that alert up and down a view, result from events. Events may be exceptionsassociated with an object or a state change of that object. Exceptions occurwhen the counters that measure performance thresholds are exceeded. Anexample of an exception could be unacceptable response time associated with aCICS transaction. Another example of an event could be the receipt of a consolemessage that a batch job terminated abnormally. This would cause a statechange to occur and would result in an event. As events occur within themonitored environment, they are collected and recorded by IBM Tivoli BusinessSystems Manager, and are displayed by tagging an alert icon on the offendingobject’s icon.Propagation leverages the object-orientated implementation inherent within theIBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager environment and continuouslydisseminates events throughout the object hierarchy. Propagation escalatesalerts up the hierarchy based on the severity of events and the volume and rateat which they occur. Exceptions, console messages, and other events areassigned priorities for each object. When an object receives an event, the eventspriority is examined and compared against tolerance rates set for that object. If athreshold is exceeded, an alert occurs on that object and sends an event to itsparent object on the hierarchy. This, in turn, can cause another event to occurand another alert to be sent further up the hierarchy. In addition to controls thatadjust rates for incoming performance exceptions, each object on the hierarchyincludes controls for events arriving from the child objects below it.Figure 1-3 on page 12 shows an alert occurring on the DB2 subsystem D7Q2object under the SC69 system. The event is propagated up the hierarchy to theEnterprise level. The propagation also takes place on the Business System Viewof the object that affects the ITSO RESOURCES object. Chapter 1. Introduction to business systems management 11
  • 41. Figure 1-3 TBSM console: propagation path Propagation is the technical component that enables IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager to progress from a physical to a logical model. As events are propagated to the physical parents of an object, they also are propagated to all Business System Views containing those objects.1.3.4 Views IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager enables you to manage resources in a way that best reflects your current organization. Your IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager implementation can reflect a decentralized or a centralized control structure. The resources either can be defined to IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager or can be discovered using various methods (for example, components, modules, or programs) to detect the configuration of the resources. Once the resources are defined or discovered, they are registered in the IBM12 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 42. Tivoli Business Systems Manager database; that is, information about theresources is stored in the database and is available for monitoring and viewing.The IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager console and the IBM Tivoli BusinessSystems Manager Web console display your enterprise’s resources in variousviews. When notifications that trigger alerts are received from the variouscollection agents within the enterprise, the alerts are displayed as graphicoverlays on the resources, indicating the different status of your resources.A resource view displays all the resources registered in the IBM Tivoli BusinessSystems Manager database. Business System Views can be created from theconsole or automatically from incoming discovery and event data. A BSV is alogical view that includes any subset of the registered resources that are ofinterest for monitoring. Each resource is represented as an icon within the view.You can create, save, and later access BSVs. Opening several windows, eachcontaining a different BSV, enables you to monitor different resources and theirvarious relationships from a single workstation. BSVs can be based on an actualbusiness system or on: An application or set of applications A department A vertical area of responsibility A geographic regionSome examples of Business System Views are: Real estate (business system) Inventory, software distribution (applications) Human Resources (department) Email gateway (vertical area of responsibility) Asia Pacific South Operations (geographical region) Chapter 1. Introduction to business systems management 13
  • 43. BSVs enable you to organize logically the resources that you want to monitor and display them in the resource system views and Business System Views using these methods: Tree view, which shows the hierarchy of the resources. Branches in the tree can be expanded or collapsed to show or hide resources. We can see this in Example 1-4. Figure 1-4 TBSM console: tree view14 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 44. Hyperview, which graphically displays a large number of resources at one time as shown in Figure 1-5.Figure 1-5 TBSM console: Hyperview Chapter 1. Introduction to business systems management 15
  • 45. Table view, which shows resources in a table format. Information for any column can be sorted and filtered as shown in Figure 1-6.Figure 1-6 TBSM console: Table view16 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 46. Business impact view, which is displayed as a hyperview, shows resources that are affected or act as parents to a specific resource, as shown in Figure 1-7.Figure 1-7 TBSM console: Business impact view Chapter 1. Introduction to business systems management 17
  • 47. Event view, which examines the events that were responsible for the state change, as shown in Figure 1-8. Figure 1-8 TBSM console: events view18 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 48. Property sheets for each of the resources, such as the one shown in Figure 1-9, enable viewing and updating of: Attributes, such as the resource name and current status Alert information, such as currently posted events and notes Thresholds for propagation and filtering Scheduling informationFigure 1-9 TBSM properties window Chapter 1. Introduction to business systems management 19
  • 49. The IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager Web console, shown in Figure 1-10, enables quick access for checking critical resources and provides various ways to view resources and events.Figure 1-10 TBSM Web console1.4 Document organization and scope This redbook is designed to provide both technical concept detail and implementation instructions to help IBM/Tivoli professionals understand and implement IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager. The content includes: Architectural detail Planning information Distributed environment implementation Mainframe information Post-implementation tasks Optional component implementation Table 1-1 on page 21 outlines the chapters for quick reference on specific topics.20 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 50. Table 1-1 Reading paths Purpose Relevant topics Understanding IBM Tivoli Chapter 2, “Components and functions” on page 25 Business Systems Chapter 3, “Database structure” on page 77 Manager architecture Planning an IBM Tivoli Chapter 2, “Components and functions” on page 25 Business Systems Chapter 5, “Implementation planning” on page 129 Manager implementation Implementing IBM Tivoli Chapter 5, “Implementation planning” on page 129 Business Systems Chapter 6, “Base services implementation” on page 149 Manager in distributed Chapter 7, “TEC components integration” on page 209 environment Chapter 8, “IBM Tivoli Monitoring integration” on page 249 Chapter 9, “IBM Tivoli NetView integration” on page 279 Implementing IBM Tivoli Chapter 5, “Implementation planning” on page 129 Business Systems Chapter 6, “Base services implementation” on page 149 Manager in z/OS Chapter 10, “z/OS installation and configuration” on environment page 331 Chapter 11, “z/OS data feeds and discovery” on page 347 Maintaining IBM Tivoli Chapter 2, “Components and functions” on page 25 Business Systems Chapter 12, “Automatic Business System View creation” Manager on page 395 Chapter 13, “Setting up roles and security” on page 421 Chapter 14, “Maintenance and tuning issues” on page 437 Extending IBM Tivoli Chapter 15, “Automatic problem ticketing” on page 465 Business Systems Manager with problem management Providing failover to IBM Chapter 16, “High availability and failover” on page 513 Tivoli Business Systems Manager servers Collecting historical Chapter 17, “Historical reporting with TEDW” on information from IBM Tivoli page 527 Business Systems Manager Chapter 1. Introduction to business systems management 21
  • 51. 1.5 Lab environment We ran the project at ITSO Austin. We set up the main IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager systems using four servers. Our lab environment is shown in Figure 1-11. TBSM Servers ibmtiv3 ibmtiv5 ibmtiv6 3C041 Windows 2000 Windows 2000 Windows 2000 Windows 2000 Console V2 Server MS SQL Server 2000 MS SQL Server 2000 Event Server Propagation Server Database Server History Server Common Listener Agent Listener Health Monitor Server Ethernet CapeCod ibmtiv9 SC64 - z/OS SC66 - z/OS SC69 - z/OS MVS1 - z/OS AIX 5.1 Windows 2000 Server TBSM Source/390 TBSM Source/390 TBSM Source/390 TBSM Source/390 Netview 7.1.2 Framework 3.7.1 Netview 5.1 Netview 5.1 Netview 5.1 Netview 5.1 TEC 3.7.1 TWS 8.1 RODM SA/390 2.2 SA/390 2.2 ITM 5.1.1 CICS RODM ITM for DB/2 5.1 CICSPlexSM DB2 V7 zOS DB/2 7.1 IMS V7.1 Classic DM 3.7 SMS XRC RMF DFSMSHSM ibmtiv8 Windows 2000 Server EndpontFigure 1-11 Network diagram The detailed software and operating system that we used is shown in Table 1-2. Table 1-2 Operating system and software detail Name OS Software ibmtiv3 Windows 2000 Advanced Console V2 Server Server Edition Propagation Server Common Listener ibmtiv5 Windows NT 2000 MS-SQL 2000 Server Enterprise Advanced Server Edition Edition Database Server Agent Listener22 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 52. Name OS Software ibmtiv6 Windows 2000 Advanced MS-SQL 2000 Server Enterprise Server Edition Edition HistoryServer Health Monitor Server ibmtiv8 Windows 2000 Server TME® Endpoint 106 Edition ibmtiv9 Windows 2000 Server Tivoli Management Framework 3.7.1 Edition IBM Tivoli Enterprise Console 3.7.1 IBM Tivoli Monitoring 5.1.1 ITM for Databases: DB2 5.1 DB2 7.1 Tivoli Distributed Monitoring 3.7 capecod AIX® 5.1 NetView® 7.1.2 IBM S/390s z/OS version 4 TBSM Source/390 2.1 Tivoli NetView for z/OS 5.1 System Automation for OS/390 V2R1 Tivoli Workload Scheduler 8.1 DB2 for z/OS 7.1 IMS 7.1 CICS TM CICSPlex® SM 2.2 Tivoli Decision Support/390 7.1 System Managed Storage 1.5 DFSMS/HSM 1.5. eXtended Remote Copy Resource Management Facility 3C041 Windows 2000 Advanced Event Handler Server Server EditionThe Tivoli Management Framework components that are installed in ourenvironment are shown in Example 1-1.Example 1-1 Result for wlsinst -a of the TMR server*-----------------------------------------------------------------------------* Product List*-----------------------------------------------------------------------------*TME 10™ Framework 3.7Tivoli Enterprise Console Adapter Configuration Facility 3.7.1BM Tivoli Monitoring, Version 5.1.0 - JRE 1.3.0Tivoli Java Client Framework 3.7Tivoli Java Client Framework 3.7.1Java for Tivoli 3.7 Chapter 1. Introduction to business systems management 23
  • 53. Java for Tivoli 3.7.1 Tivoli Java RDBMS Interface Module (JRIM) 3.7 JavaHelp for Tivoli 3.7 Swing for Tivoli 3.7 Tivoli Enterprise Console Console 3.7.1 Tivoli Enterprise Console Server 3.7.1 Tivoli Enterprise Console User Interface Server 3.7.1 IBM Tivoli Monitoring, Version 5.1.1 Tivoli MDist 2 Graphical User Interface *-----------------------------------------------------------------------------* Patch List *-----------------------------------------------------------------------------* 3.7.1 Tivoli Enterprise Console ACF Fixpack 3 3.7.1 Tivoli Enterprise Console Console Fixpack 3 3.7.1 Tivoli Enterprise Console Server Fixpack 3 Tivoli Framework Patch 3.7.1-TMF-0088 (build 11/01) Tivoli Framework Patch 3.7.1-TMF-0089 (build 10/16) Tivoli Framework Patch 3.7.1-TMF-0090 (build 09/13) 3.7.1 Tivoli Enterprise Console User Interface Server Fixpack 3 IBM Tivoli Monitoring, Version 5.1.1 - Fixpack 1 IBM Tivoli Monitoring - Tivoli Enterprise Data Warehouse Support, Version 5.1.1 Fixpack 1 Tivoli Java RDBMS Interface Module (JRIM) 3.7.1 JavaHelp for Tivoli 3.7.1 Swing for Tivoli 3.7.1 Tivoli Framework 3.7.1 Maintenance Release (build 03/15) Tivoli MDist 2 Graphical User Interface 3.7.1 Maintenance Release We used a relatively small Tivoli framework environment to illustrate this example. You will need to install IBM Tivoli Monitoring 5.1.1 on the gateway before installing the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager adapter. In our case, the endpoint that we are going to monitor will be logged into a gateway on our TMR.24 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 54. 2 Chapter 2. Components and functions In this section we discuss the basic components and functions of IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager, and elaborate on these topics in the following sections: 2.1, “Product structure” on page 26 gives an overview of IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager product components 2.2, “Base services” on page 29 explains the main component of IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager that resides on the Windows servers 2.3, “Distributed resource feeds” on page 45 explains the data feeds from various distributed systems management tools 2.4, “Mainframe (z/OS) resource feeds” on page 53 explains the various interfaces from the z/OS 2.5, “History server, reporting, and health monitor” on page 68 discusses the optional components of IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager© Copyright IBM Corp. 2003. All rights reserved. 25
  • 55. 2.1 Product structure The major components of the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager are shown in Figure 2-1. Base Services TBSM Servers Ÿ Database server Ÿ Event server Ÿ Propagation server Ÿ Console server Ÿ History server Ÿ others SNA (LU6.2) TCP/IP TCP/IP Distributed Resouces Feeds Mainframe Resources Feeds § Tivoli Enterprise Ÿ Applications Console Ÿ Batch systems § IBM Tivoli Ÿ Database systems Monitoring Ÿ Online systems § Tivoli Ÿ Operating system Instrumentation Ÿ Storage systems Service (AMS) OS/390 Figure 2-1 IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager product structure IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager has three major components: Base services, which includes database storage for current and historical data, event receiving and handling services, as well as functions to provide the graphical client interface of the product. As the name indicates, this is the base function that enables you to process events coming from the mainframe, the distributed environment, or both. IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager uses Windows servers as its platform. Distributed resources feeds, which provides the support for the distributed environment including Tivoli Management Framework and other IBM software and third-party software. Some of the distributed sources include: – IBM Tivoli Enterprise Console 3.6.2 and 3.7.1 – IBM Tivoli Management Framework 3.6.1, or later – IBM Tivoli Workload Scheduler 8.1 (Host and Distributed) – IBM Tivoli NetView (Distributed)26 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 56. – IBM Tivoli Monitoring – IBM Tivoli Monitoring for Databases, Applications, Business Integration, Web Infrastructure, and Collaboration – Tivoli Distributed Monitoring (Classic) – BMC Patrol 3.4 – CA TNG 2.1, 2.2, and 2.4 – NetIQ AppManager 4.02 Mainframe resources feeds (often referred to as Source/390), which enables the processing of events from multiple z/OS subsystems and applications. The enterprise edition must run some pre-discovery processes before the object creation and event propagation of the objects can work. The IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager enterprise edition enables you to manage the following entities on your z/OS systems: – Applications – Batch systems – Database systems – Online systems – Operating systems – Storage systems Some of the z/OS sources include: – IBM CICS® Transaction Server 1.3, 2.1, and 2.2 – IBM Tivoli NetView for OS/390 1.3 and later – IBM Tivoli Operations, Planning, and Control 2.2 and 2.3 – IBM Tivoli Workload Scheduler for z/OS 8.1 – IBM DB2 Performance Monitor Versions 5, 6, and 7 – IBM WebSphere®® OS/390 3.5, 4.0, and 4.0.1 – IBM Tivoli Storage Management Systems 1.4 and 1.5 – IBM Storage Management Systems for OS/390 2.10 – IBM System Automation for OS/390 1.3 and 2.1 – BMC Mainview for MVS™™ 2.5.01 or later – BMC Mainview for CICS 5.4.0 or later – BMC Mainview for IMS 3.2.0 or later – BMC Mainview for DB2 7.1 or later – BMC Control M 5.1.4 – BMC Auto Operator 6.0 and 6.1 – Landmark TMON for MVS 2.0 or later – Landmark TMON for CICS 2.0 or later – Landmark TMON for DB2 3.2 or later – CA/7 3.2 and 3.3 – CA OPS/MVS 4.2, 4.3, and 4.4 – Candle Omegamon1 II for MVS Versions 500 and 520 – Candle Omegamon II for CICS Versions 500 and 5201 IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager currently only supports Omegamon classic interface Chapter 2. Components and functions 27
  • 57. – Candle Omegamon II for DB2 Versions 500 and 520 – Candle Omegamon II for IMS Versions 500 and 520 – Candle AF/Operator 3.1.0 and 3.2.0 – ASG Zeke 4.5 and 5.1 Interfaces between these components and IBM Tivoli products will be discussed in greater detail in the following sections. Typically IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager base services is installed on six Windows machines, with the name and role of each Windows machine as follows: Host Integration server Acts as a conduit for Source/390 components in z/OS to the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager base services. It runs on Microsoft Host Integration Server and establishes a session with z/OS eNetwork Communication Server or VTAM® on the host, and it serves the SNA client on the event handler server to enable information exchange. It was called SNA server in previous versions. This server is not needed for TCP/IP connection. Event Handler server Receives, processes, and reacts to z/OS events. This machine requires SNA client or Host Integration client software, even when you run only TCP/IP connection. Database server Provides the database repository, which is the heart of IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager processing. It hosts the object repository in the Microsoft SQL Server database. Console server Serves the client workstation connections. (This used to be called Application server.) Propagation server Processes events and calculates the necessary propagation action. History server Maintains an audit trail of all actions and events acted on by IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager on a SQL server database for reporting and analysis purposes. It contains replicated data from the database server. Additonal servers are needed to provide optional functions: Web console server Provides the user with a Web-based administrative console to IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager. The Web console differs in appearance and behavior from the console. It runs in kiosk mode, the mode of a Web browser without any browser controls (such as the28 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 58. menu bar and tool bar) activated. Operators can perform the same basic monitoring and problem-determination tasks as with the regular console, and administrators can perform additional tasks such as creating shared filters. Health Monitor Server Monitors the health and availability of IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager processes and queues. This machine enables you to monitor the performance and availability of IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager components. You can monitor the various services, disk utilization, database space, system queues, and connections to the various data sources. You may need additional servers for test and quality assurance systems. For IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager distributed implementation, some of these functionalities can be merged. The recommended configuration of IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager distributed consists only of a database server and a merged server. The merged server consists of the propagation server, application server, and the common listener function.2.2 Base services The IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager base services consists of a set of Windows services running on the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager servers. This section provides an in-depth description of the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager base services. The discussion consists of: 2.2.1, “Components and data flow” on page 29 2.2.2, “Installation directory structure” on page 39 2.2.3, “Windows registry structure” on page 40 2.2.4, “Log files” on page 432.2.1 Components and data flow To better understand how IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager components interact, see the diagram in Figure 2-2 on page 30. It shows the interaction of the base services servers component. Chapter 2. Components and functions 29
  • 59. zOS Tivoli Data Tivoli NetView Warehouse Source/390 for zOS TBSM Servers Host Integration Event Handler History Server Server Server Web Console Propagation Console Web Console Server Database Server Server Server Console Agent Common Listener Health Monitor Listener Service Server Health Monitor Client Tivoli Management Region Distributed Data TEC Task Server Source. Event Enablement ( Netview, ITM)Figure 2-2 TBSM flowchart The main components are shown in dark gray boxes, while the other IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager components are shown in light gray boxes. Non-IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager components are shown in white boxes. The database server is the centerpiece, to which all components eventually connect. Specific components for connection to other pieces are shown, such as the Source/390 in z/OS and Agent Listener and Common Listener in distributed systems. For TCP/IP based connection, the Source/390 will connect directly to the Event Handler server. In IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager V2R1, installation is simplified to a certain number of components. Table 2-1 on page 31 shows the list of services that are installed and run for each component. Most components relate to specific servers; however, some components may be combined in certain servers.30 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 60. Table 2-1 IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager services by component Server Services Notes Database server ASIDBValidater Agent Listener is installed ASIMVSIPListenerSvc from the Distributed TEC ASIPADispatcher listener component that ASIStagedEventLoader generally resides in this ASITaskServer server ASIEvent Enablement ASITSDEvent HandlerSvc Console Server ASIDBValidater ASIConsoleServerV2 Propagation Server ASIDBValidater Propagation agent is started ASIRemoteExecutionServer with ASIPAgent.exe ASIEnqueueProxy Server Event handler server ASIDBValidater For SNA-based connection: ASIEnqueueProxyServer ASIMVSSenderSvc ASIMVSIPOSListener ASIMVSListenerSvc ASIMVSEventHandlerSvc ASIMVSIPSenderSvc ASIMVSUploadRuleSvc Distributed TEC ASIAgentListenerSvc This is usually installed in the component database server Health Monitor server ASIHealthMonitor Health monitor can be installed in the history server Web console server TivoliPresentationServices Web server services from HTTPServer Tivoli presentation services TivoliPresentationServices for the Web console HTTPAdministration ps_wc ps_mcr Common listener ASICommonListener Common listener can be installed together with application or propagation server History Server - No services installed Health Monitor Client - No services installedThe following sections discuss the role of each service. Chapter 2. Components and functions 31
  • 61. Tivoli BSM Database Validater (ASIDBValidater) This service validates the availability of database connections for all IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager servers. The database validater service runs on all IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager servers. All other IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager services that access the database are made dependent on this service. The database validater periodically runs the query shown in Example 2-1. This query can be found under the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager registry key ComponentsASIDBValidaterSettings in the value of TestSQL. We have formatted the query display. Example 2-1 Database validater query if db_name()=master begin if exists (select * from sysobjects where type=X and name=xp_createnotificationevent) exec(xp_createnotificationevent) if exists (select * from sysobjects where type=X and name=xp_creatependingevent) exec(xp_creatependingevent) if exists (select * from sysobjects where type=X and name=xp_createrulecmdevent) exec(xp_createrulecmdevent) end else select * from sysobjects where name=sysobjects Tivoli BSM Propagation Agent Dispatcher (ASIPADispatcher) The Tivoli BSM propagation agent dispatcher manages the propagation agents. It calls the remote execution server in the propagation server the propagation agent. When an event is generated, it notifies the enqueue proxy server on the propagation server to put the events into the propagation agent’s queue file. Currently, restarting the propagation agent dispatcher is the only appropriate way to start or restart the propagation agent. When the Propagation Agent Dispatcher is stopped, it stops the propagation agent on the propagation server through the remote execution server. Tivoli BSM Staged Event Loader (ASIStagedEventLoader) This service is responsible for loading events to the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager database. This process must run continuously. This process works with the ObjectEvents database.32 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 62. Tivoli BSM Task Server (ASITaskServer)This component is used to issue commands on the monitored resources. Twotypes of commands are supported: z/OS command through Tivoli NetView for z/OS running a Tivoli Management Framework taskIt invokes the send command using the tgmtask utility.Typically, the task server running on the database server only holds theconnection to Tivoli NetView for z/OS through the NETCONV session. If you arenot managing any resources that belong to the z/OS, you may disable thisservice.The task server that is used for Tivoli Management Framework tasks runs on aTivoli Enterprise Console server together with the event enablement service.This task server is installed using the Tivoli Management Framework winstallcommand. The task server that runs a Tivoli Management Framework task mustbe running under a Tivoli-authorized administrator user ID, and the machine mustbe a managed node in a Tivoli Management Region (TMR).Tivoli BSM Event Enablement (ASIEventEnablement)This component is supposed to be used in the distributed components with theAgent Listener service to handle Tivoli Enterprise Console events. The servicethat is installed in the database server is not used. You may want to disable thisservice.The event enablement process has to run on the same machine as the TivoliEnterprise Console to receive events from it.Tivoli BSM MVS IP Listener (ASIMVSIPListenerSvc)This process waits for the connection from z/OS. This IP-based listener is usedfor bulk file transfers from z/OS. Specifically, it handles discovery of resourcesthat are sent using the program GTMAOPE0, typically by listening to port 1021. Itcan handle character conversion and localization. More discussion on thisprocess is provided in Chapter 11, “z/OS data feeds and discovery” on page 347.Tivoli BSM TSD Event Handler (ASITSDEventHandlerSvc)This component is used for integration with problem management software,typically Tivoli Service Desk. It processes problem ticket closure events that aregenerated by the problem management product and applies them to theappropriate IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager information. More discussionon problem management is given in Chapter 15, “Automatic problem ticketing” onpage 465. Chapter 2. Components and functions 33
  • 63. Tivoli BSM Console Server Version 2 (ASIConsoleServerV2) The console server handles communication to the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager Java console. It communicates with the database server for any updates on events and objects, and applies them to all the open consoles. It also helps maintain all active console sessions to the database server. The console is a role-based user interface in which you set up roles to determine a user’s access rights. The roles are: Restricted Operator, Operator, Administrator, and Super Administrator. The console server in version 2 uses four Windows groups to categorize the authentication of an operator. An operator who does not belong to any of the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager groups cannot open the console. The console monitors resources for state changes and performance characteristics that reflect availability. If the availability of a resource or resources is threatened, an alert icon is placed next to the resource or subsystem. Notification of alerts and events management are the console’s primary tasks. By observing views, end users can see whether the system, subsystem, or resource is available and performing correctly. The Java console connects to the console server through port 80 (http), therefore it most likely can go through firewalls. Note: If backward compatablity is required for previous IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager consoles, you also should load Application Server services. Tivoli BSM Remote Execution (ASIRemoteExecutionServer) The remote execution server is responsible for starting and stopping the propagation agent at the request of the propagation agent dispatcher. Tivoli BSM Enqueue Proxy Server (ASIEnqueueProxyServer) The enqueue proxy server receives messages that are meant to be processed by other components or services: For the MVS sender service in the event handler server, it puts the message into the <SMFid>_Upload.que file For the propagation agent in the propagation server for events that need to be propagated, the message is typically put into ROOT-0001.que The queue file typically resides in the TivoliManagerdataQueues directory. There are two important commands for queue files: dumpfqueue and dequeue. The dumpfqueue checks the status of the queue file, while dequeue is used to clean up the queue file.34 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 64. The syntax for dumpfqueue command is dumpfqueue <queuefilename> as shownin Example 2-2.Example 2-2 Sample dumpfqueue resultC:TivoliManagerDataQueues>dumpfqueue AgentListener.queName=AGENTLISTENER.QUE CellSize=2048 MaxEntries=70000 HeadOffset=512TailOffset=512 EnqueueCount=35287 DequeueCount=35287 FlushCount=0 FileEntries=0SemaphoreEntries=0 Locked=No Empty=YesEnqueueCount and DequeueCount indicate queue activity. The EnqueueCountnumber should equal the DequeueCount number. The result Empty=Yes indicatesthat there is no data currently in the queue.The syntax for dequeue command isdequeue -t<timeout> -r<repeat_count> -p<pause_time> -s -v -x <queuepath>where:<queuepath> File path to queue (required).-t<timeout> Dequeue timeout in milliseconds.-r<repeat_count> Repeat count. Specify -1 for infinite repeat.-p<pause_time> Pause between operations in milliseconds.-s Silent operation. Will not output queue entries to stdout. Useful with binary data.-v Output all printable data. Useful with binary data. May be used with -x.-x Output all data in hexidecimal. Useful with binary data. May be used with -v.Propagation agent (ASIPAgent.exe)The propagation agent calculates the propagation events that must be performedand updates the database server. See 3.4, “Status propagation” on page 87 formore on the propagation process.Tivoli BSM MVS IP OS Listener (ASIMVSIPOSListener)This is the new TCP/IP-based MVS OS Listener that listens to connectionrequests from the Source/390 Object Server process from z/OS. It typicallylistens at port 1022. When a connection is acheved, it spawns a listener thread tocommunicate with the Source/390 object server. You can use the netstat -a |grep 1022 command to check the connection from port 1022. Our listener isconnected to four z/OS systems as shown in Example 2-3 on page 36. Chapter 2. Components and functions 35
  • 65. Example 2-3 MVS IP listener connection C:>netstat -a | grep 1022 TCP 3c041:1022 3c041:0 LISTENING TCP 3c041:1022 wtsc66.itso.ibm.com:1051 ESTABLISHED TCP 3c041:1022 wtsc64.itso.ibm.com:1556 ESTABLISHED TCP 3c041:1022 wtsc69.itso.ibm.com:3201 ESTABLISHED TCP 3c041:1022 bldmvs1.boulder.ibm.com:1031 ESTABLISHED Tivoli BSM MVS Listener (ASIMVSListenerSvc) This is the SNA-based MVS listener that waits for the connection request from the Source/390 object server. It is started as an LU6.2 transaction program by the TPSTART utility. The listener process writes in two log files. The first log has the prefix LS and contains the listener initialization before it knows the z/OS image that contacted it. The second log has the prefix MVSL and contains the SMF ID of the z/OS that triggers the listener process. The MVS listener will put the messages it receives into a queue file. The logs indicate whether TPStart has successfully launched the listener process and will show whether an SNA session has been established through the SNA server to the host. Tivoli BSM MVS Event Handler (ASIMVSEventHandlerSvc-nnn) The MVS event handler retrieves the queued MVS listener messages from a queue file. The queue file name is the same as the SMF ID of the z/OS origin of the message. It sends the message to the staged event loader in the database server and notifies the MVS upload rule services to process the message. Each connected z/OS image has a different event handler process. Tivoli BSM MVS Upload Rule Server (ASIMVSUploadRuleSvc) The MVS upload rule server processes the z/OS message and constructs the appropriate responses to the z/OS components. It is responsible for starting the various registration processes and starting the object initialization in the database server. The upload rule service is dependent on the rule database in ASIRuleSvc database. The ASIRuleSvc contains shadow data from various z/OS objects in the Object database for rule processing. This information is created the first time the upload rule service is started and is recorded in the ObjectSync table. To re-initiate the collection of information, delete the row in the ASIRuleSvc’s ObjectSync table. After creating a new operating system object, run the SQL statement delete from ASIRuleSvc..ObjectSync and then restart the upload rule server.36 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 66. Tivoli BSM MVS IP Sender (ASIMVSIPSenderSvc-nnnn)The replies that are constructed by the various scripts from the upload ruleservice are put into the upload queue by the enqueue proxy server. The senderservice is responsible for actually sending them. This IP-based sender serviceconnects to the Source/390 object server through a typical port (usually 1023,but in our setup 1023 is used for UNIX System Services login, so we configuredthe sender to connect through port 1024).Each z/OS image has a separate sender service and upload queue files.Tivoli BSM MVS Sender Svc (ASIMVSSenderSvc-nnnn)This is the SNA-based sender service that acts as an LU6.2 transaction program.The behavior is similar to the IP-based sender service. Note: Chapter 10, “z/OS installation and configuration” on page 331 has more information about these z/OS communication services.Tivoli BSM Agent Listener (ASIAgentListenerSvc)The Agent Listener service is used to receive events from the Tivoli EnterpriseConsole. It connects and registers itself to an event enablement process usingthe gemeeconfig command for configuration. This component is discussed ingreater detail in Chapter 7, “TEC components integration” on page 209.Tivoli BSM Health Monitor Server (ASIHealthMonitor)This service runs the HMSQueries.ksh using the SRVANY.exe from the WindowsResource Kit. The HMSQueries.ksh runs a set of predefined checks and thensleeps for 60 seconds.It retrieves availability data from a variety of sources and produces files that areused as input to the interface, which the service makes available to healthmonitor clients. The collection of input files from a single sample areconcatenated into a single output file called TotalSummary.txt (usually located inthe TivoliManagerMgmtHMSInput directory). Total summary files aredate-stamped and time-stamped and placed in a directory called Output(TivoliManagerMgmtHMSOutput). This file, which can be viewed using a texteditor, contains a complete snapshot of the working system for that given timestamp. It can be archived to provide a complete history of how IBM TivoliBusiness Systems Manager servers have performed over a given period. Chapter 2. Components and functions 37
  • 67. The GUI displays these systems health monitor components: Database Blocking: Monitors the hosts and processes that cause database blocks, and alerts system administrators to potentially harmful system availability problems. Database Lock Summary: An adjunct-monitoring window to the Database Blocking facility. Monitors what database processes are locking database tables and pages at the time of the sampling interval. DB Queues: Monitors the status of the Tivoli Business Systems Manager database queues, enabling you to determine whether the components servicing those queues are operating correctly, and checks the status of propagation and notification. MVS Status: Monitors the status of the MVS listener processes, event handler, and sender services, and monitors the processing of data received from hosts that are running the Source/390 program. PAgent Status: Monitors the status of Propagation Agent processes and the processing of events by those Propagation Agents. Required Services: Monitors the status for all Tivoli Business Systems Manager services required for Windows-based system availability. Server Disk Usage: Monitors the percentage of disk usage on Tivoli Business Systems Manager production servers by host name and drive letter. SQL Response Time: Monitors the performance of key stored procedures that Tivoli Business Systems Manager users execute on a regular basis. Staged Event Status: Monitors the depth and processing of Staged Event Queues with the Tivoli Business Systems Manager database processing of the message and exception queues in the database. Tivoli BSM Common Listener (ASICommonListener) The Common Listener provides a scalable infrastructure for the integration of product instrumentation into IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager. Data is sent by monitoring product to the Common Listener, which updates the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager database. More discussion about the Common Listener with IBM Tivoli Monitoring is provided in Chapter 8, “IBM Tivoli Monitoring integration” on page 249, and discussion about the Common Listener with IBM Tivoli NetView is provided in Chapter 9, “IBM Tivoli NetView integration” on page 279. Conceptual discussion of the common listener process is given in 2.3, “Distributed resource feeds” on page 45.38 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 68. 2.2.2 Installation directory structure IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager installed on Windows machines provides the directory structure shown in Figure 2-3. This directory structure typically is created under TivoliManager and shared as Access1$ for easy access by other IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager servers. Figure 2-3 IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager Windows directory structure Some of these directories will not be present on all servers. The component installed influences the directories installed. The following are used in the directories: Autotrace Configures automatic tracing for Common Listener and Console Server java processes. bin Main executable path for IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager. This must be in the system path. CommonListener Common listener installation directory. ConsoleServer Console server installation directory. Data Data directory used for Tivoli Information Management for z/OS integration. Dataproducts Directories where Tivoli Manager for products definition is stored. Chapter 2. Components and functions 39
  • 69. DataQueues Queue files directory where the enqueue proxy server writes files. DataRules Rule directory that is used by the ASIMVSUploadRule server. Rule files have the .clp extension. Lang Language-specific locale for character translation tables. Logs Main log directory, shared as Logs$ man Not used. Mgmt Directory for health monitor program and output files. This directory is shared as Mgmt$ sql Directory for storing SQL queries. TDS Topology Display Services: the installation path for event enablement and task server. xdfparser Parser script for decoding Application management instrumentation definitions into IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager.2.2.3 Windows registry structure Most of the settings for IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager services are stored in the Windows registry under the following key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESoftwareAccessible Software, Inc.Access11.0 A sample registry tree is shown in Figure 2-4 on page 41.40 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 70. Figure 2-4 Registry treeThe main folders in this registry structure are:Components Where most of the services’ settings are stored; however, the setting for services from the propagation servers are not located here.Settings The location of the global settings for this server’s IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager in this server.SetupDefaults The values of the installation parameters that we enter from the installation dialogs.The Settings folder has a hierarchical design, so all information is retireved froma branch’s innermost folder. If it does not exist there, it will be retrieved from thefolder that is in the next level. As an example, we will find the log file prefix, loglevel, and log directory from the registry tree for the MVS IP OS Listener forSC66, as shown in Figure 2-5 on page 42. All registry paths are relative toHKLMSOFTWAREAccessible Software, IncAccess11.0: The log file prefix (MVSL_SC66) is retrieved from ComponentsASIMVSIPOSListenerSvcInstancesSC66SettingsLog, as that Chapter 2. Components and functions 41
  • 71. is the innermost setting with that value. If the listener has not been associated with any instance, it will use the setting in ComponentsASIMVSIPOSListenerSvcSettingsLog, which is MVSIP. The LogLevel information for all MVS IP OS Listeners is retrieved from ComponentsASIMVSIPOSListenerSvcSettingsLog, as it cannot be found on the innermost Setting in ComponentsASIMVSIPOSListenerSvcInstancesSC66SettingsLog. The Log directory is not present in either ComponentsASIMVSIPOSListenerSvcInstancesSC66SettingsLog or ComponentsASIMVSIPOSListenerSvcSettingsLog; therefore it is retrieved from SettingsLog path.Figure 2-5 Hierarchical setting Another important setting is the database setting in SettingsDB, as shown in Figure 2-6 on page 43. It contains the database access information that is used42 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 72. by some programs to gain access to the database. This key contains the database system administrator (sa) password. Figure 2-6 Database setting2.2.4 Log files Log files for the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager processes are very important for understanding how these processes work and for debugging if a problem occurs. Each process in IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager generates log files. Most of these files are stored under TivoliManagerlogs, and their settings are stored in the registry, as shown in Figure 2-5 on page 42. The list of standard log files is provided in Table 2-2. Table 2-2 TBSM services log files Process name Log prefix ASIDBValidater - Tivoli BSM Database Validater ASIPADispatcher PD Tivoli BSM Propagation Agent Dispatcher ASIEnqueueProxyServer EPS Tivoli BSM Enqueue Proxy Server ASIRemoteExecution Server RX Tivoli BSM Remote Execution Server PAgent.exe PA ASIApplicationSvc AS Tivoli BSM Application Server ASINotificationSvc NS Tivoli BSM Notification Server ASIMVSIPOSListenerSvc MVSIP Tivoli BSM MVS IP Listener MVSL_nnnn_ Chapter 2. Components and functions 43
  • 73. Process name Log prefix ASIMVSListenerSvc LS MVSL_nnnn_ ASIMVSEventHandlerSvc-nnnn MVSE_nnnn_ Tivoli BSM MVS EventHandlerSvc-nnnn ASIMVSUploadRuleSvc MVSURS Tivoli BSM MVSUpload Rule Server ASIMVSIPSenderSvc-nnnn MVSS_nnnn_ Tivoli BSM MVS IPSenderSvc-nnnn ASIMVSSenderSvc-nnnn MVSS_nnnn_ Tivoli BSM MVSSenderSvc-nnnn ASIStagedEventLoader SEL Tivoli BSM Staged Event Loader ASIMVSIPListener IPL Tivoli BSM MVSIPListener ASIAgentListener AL Tivoli BSM Agent Listener ASIRuleSvc RLS Tivoli BSM Rule Server ASITaskServer ihstsmsg.log Tivoli BSM Task Server ihstserr.log ASIEventEnablement ihseemsg.log Tivoli BSM Event Enablement ihseeerr.log TSDEventHandlerSvc TBSMTSD.log Tivoli BSM TSD Event Handler ASICommonListener CL Tivoli BSM Common Listener ASICLTransportn.log ASIConsoleServerV2 ConsoleServerTBSMServ Tivoli BSM Console Server V2 ern.log The logging level for an IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager–based log is controlled from the LogLevel registry value in the Settings folder. The log files that are shown in full in Table 2-2 on page 43 do not use the standard IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager format.44 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 74. The standard IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager log format is set in the LogHeading registry value. Typically the format is: %Y/%m/%d %H:%M:%S|%t|%O|%o|logprefix|%i|%F|%L| The format variables include: %Y Year %m Month %d Date %H Hour %M Minute %S Second %t Microsecond %O Record types: DBG debug INF informational NOT notice ERR error WRN warning CRT critical %o Priority, which indicates what logging level will show this type of record %i Thread ID %F Source program name %L Line number in the source program2.3 Distributed resource feeds The IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager distributed components are shown in Figure 2-7 on page 46. Basically IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager supports two interfaces for distributed environment: through agent listener and common listener. We will describe both interfaces. Chapter 2. Components and functions 45
  • 75. Tivoli Management IBM Tivoli Monitoring Region (TMR) (ITM) Tivoli Management Framework APM Instrumentation TBSM Task Server (ihscts) Tivoli Distributed Monitoring Classic Tivoli Netview Tivoli TBSM Distributed Enterprise Event Enablement Console (ihstdmai) (TEC) BMC PATROL Generic TEC Events CA Unicenter Net IQ Tivoli Manager for Products Agent Common Listener Listener TBSM Database Server TBSM Servers Figure 2-7 Flowchart for distributed system2.3.1 Agent Listener The Agent Listener system processes connections from Tivoli Enterprise Console (TEC). Any resources that send events to TEC can be forwarded through the event enablement process into the agent listener. This connection is handled by two processes that should run on the TEC server machine: Event enablement, which enables monitoring of any distributed resource, the status of which can be communicated using a Tivoli Enterprise Console event. Connectivity to IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager is provided by the agent listener process. The task server, which interacts with the IBM Tivoli Management Framework. Command requests from an operator are routed to the task server using the46 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 76. tgmtask utility, which invokes a Tivoli Framework task on the appropriate destination. Responses are returned to the task server where they are correlated with the request and routed back to the requesting operator.Several types of events can be forwarded through this interface, as shown inFigure 2-7 on page 46: Application Policy Management (APM) instrumentation Tivoli Distributed Monitoring events Any generic TEC eventThe Tivoli Manager for product uses the APM interface to send heartbeat eventsand threshold violation status to TEC, while the new IBM Tivoli Monitoring formodules uses the generic TEC event interface to forward events to IBM TivoliBusiness Systems Manager.APM instrumentationAPM resources are defined through Application Management Specification(AMS) definitions. Many software products are instrumented with AMS. Theseproducts, if not predefined in IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager, can bedefined manually in IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager using the (xdf)parserutility. This utility interprets the AMS definitions and creates SQL definitions thatextend the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager data model. This (xdf)parserutility is implemented in Java. It has its own JRE.An AMS definition is distributed in files as shown in Figure 2-8. organizes Application Business System (GDF) (BSDF) Business Subsystem isComposedOf (BSSDF) isComposedOf Software Component (CDF) Business Component isComposedOf (BCDF) Business Mapping mapsToSoftwareComponent (BMDF) mapsToBusinessComponentFigure 2-8 AMS description files Chapter 2. Components and functions 47
  • 77. Application The application building block, which is used to group a set of software components, captures information that applies to all the components of an application. Software Component The most fundamental building block, the software component is a manageable unit of an application that resides on a particular platform. The software component building block describes the management requirements, such as installation, configuration, and monitoring, for a single software component on a single platform. Business System In many cases, applications are combined into a high-level system that performs a particular business function. The business system is a combination of applications and technologies that interact with each other to fulfill a critical business function. Business Subsystem The business subsystem organizes business components into groups based on a common function in order to provide another level of management. Business Component Business systems are made up of components that describe the role a software component plays within a business system. For example, an Internet server could be an order entry interface or an airline ticketing server, depending on what business system it belongs to. Business Mapping This provides the mapping for business system components to software components. Table 2-3 shows definitions resulting from AMS definition file types. Table 2-3 AMS types AMS filetype TBSM definitions bsdf Business System View definitions, depending on the type: Business System, Application, or Middleware bssdf Business System View definitions bmdf Ties the component to its Business System View and provides instance filtering for the Business System View bcdf No correlated IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager definitions are created gdf Defines and provides the name of the default task library48 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 78. AMS filetype TBSM definitions cdf IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager object type for the component name and version. Associates the icon used at the console. Tasks are added to the menu items for the instance, and the name of alternate task libraries is specified. A Business System View is created for the manufacturer of the component.Several TEC event classes are related to these definitions. All of these eventclasses are defined in the software component level, shipped with the eventenablement component in the file interapp.baroc, and processed by interapp.rlsusing a specific IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager exit as shown inTable 2-4.Table 2-4 TEC exits for event forwarding Exit Input event type TBSM event type ihstetec APM Heartbeat APM Heartbeat ihstmtec APM Threshold APM Threshold ihstctec APM Connection Change - (not used in TBSM) ihststec APM System layer - (not used in TBSM)For IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager processing, the APM Heartbeatindicates: The discovery of the resource. That the resource is still alive. A certain length of time without the heartbeat can change the alert state of the resource to yellow or red.The APM Threshold indicates whether a threshold is exceeded. It will triggerexception processing for the resource.Distributed Monitoring resources Important: This resource class only applies to the classic Tivoli Distributed Monitoring profile. It does not applies to IBM Tivoli Monitoring resources as the generated event.Distributed Monitoring resources are defined to IBM Tivoli Business SystemsManager using the gemdmmap command. With this command, we create a newclass for a software component and a monitoring collection that is associatedwith it. More than one monitoring collection can be associated with a software Chapter 2. Components and functions 49
  • 79. component, but a monitoring profile cannot be associated with more than one software component. Distributed Monitoring profiles also can be added to APM-defined software components. For example, to associate a monitoring profile for Domino™ monitors to the APM-defined instrumentation of Tivoli Manager for Domino, we use the gemdmmap command to create an association for a monitoring profile to the APM-based Domino object class. The sentry events that are sent by the profile are processed as APM Threshold exceptions. The software component instance must be created with the APMHeartbeat event. Distributed Monitoring events will correlate to APM instances when the monitoring profiles are distributed to the same managed node or endpoint where the APM resources are located. The Distributed Monitoring events must be forwarded to IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager using the ihstztec exit. Generic TEC interface The generic TEC interface provides the ability to integrate a generic TEC event into IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager objects as a generic GEM object class. The events that are not triggered by Tivoli Distributed Monitoring can also be forwarded to IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager and defined as a separate software component using this API. Use gemgenprod.sh to define a generic distributed object. TEC event forwarding should be performed using the ihstttec exit. Most of the objects defined and created for the IBM Tivoli Monitoring for products are defined in this class. Mainframe objects This class represents APM objects that are instrumented using IBM Tivoli NetView for z/OS Application Management Instrumentation (AMI). The objects in this class are created under the Operating System object, under the Complex - Machine - LPAR hierarchy based on the content of the host name field. AMI resources receive the APM Heartbeat and APM Threshold events similar to other APM resources. The only difference is that the event is sent from Tivoli NetView for z/OS through the Event Automation Services to TEC. There is no interface to create this type of object. Refer to Instrumenting Enterprise Application using Tivoli GEM, SG24-5399 for a complete discussion of AMI. There is no creation interface for these mainframe objects. However, a sample creation script gemmfprod.sh is provided in “The gemmfprod.sh script” on page 558.50 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 80. 2.3.2 Common listener The common listener interface provides a generic interface in which any type of object can be created, updated, or deleted. Figure 2-9 shows the detailed mechanism of the common listener. Application TBSM adapter transport layer Common listener TBSM Database Figure 2-9 Common listener connection IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager has an adapter that collects event data from distributed data sources as follows: IBM Tivoli Monitoring IBM Tivoli NetView Tivoli Workload Scheduler V8 BMC PATROL Unicenter TNG NetIQ The Common Listener service enables products to send bulk discovery, delta discovery, and event information to IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager without going through TEC. Depending on the sending adapter, resource discovery information can be sent through the common listener service with the events routed through TEC for correlation. The common listener transport uses message queueing technology that is implemented in Java. It transports extended markup language (XML) messages that are formated using the Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP). Three types of objects can be manipulated using the common listener interface: Instance, which relates to a real resource instance in the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager database. This type of object can be created, updated, or deleted. Link, which relates to a physical containment link or topology link in IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager. A link can be created or deleted only. Event, which can be applied to an instance. Chapter 2. Components and functions 51
  • 81. Example 2-4 shows a sample event formatted in XML. Example 2-4 Formatted XML for an event through Common Listener <event> <time>1037738248</time> <id> <class>OperatingSystem</class> <instid>os_ibmtiv9</instid> </id> <type>TMW_HighProcesses@TMW_Processor</type> <context>[666252843]Processor=0;</context> <tbsm> <type>EXCP</type> <desc>High CPU Usage, High CPU Usage User Priv, and High CPU Usage Process are exceeded on the processor 0. (;highprocesses= 2.0000 ;idprocess= 204.0000 ;percentprocessortime= 98.0000 ;process=&quot;CSRSS&quot; ;processor=&quot;0&quot;) </desc> </tbsm> <tecstatus> <severity>CRITICAL</severity> </tecstatus> </event> More information about the database structure of common listener can be found in 3.6, “Common listener resources” on page 95.52 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 82. 2.4 Mainframe (z/OS) resource feeds Mainframe component connectivity is shown in Figure 2-10. zOS WebSphere for OS/390 TBSM SOURCE/390 DFSMShsm MVS Console SMS Messages and Commands XRC RODM EKGNotify CICSPlex System CPSM API SOURCE/390 Manager for OS/390 Object Pump Resource Management Facility GPMSERVE External Data OMEGAMON 3270 screen Interface (EDI) CICS Transient Data Program-to- program Interface (PPI) Tivoli Workload Scheduler SA/390 V1R3 and other automation tools Automation EDI interface SOURCE/390 Dataspace CICSPlex Tivoli NetView for z/OS IMS SOURCE/390 Object Server DB2 GTMAOPE0 System Automation for OS/390 V2R1 TCP/IP SNA NETCONV TBSM Servers MVS IP Listener Host Task Server Database Event Server integration Server Server Figure 2-10 z/OS components and feeds Chapter 2. Components and functions 53
  • 83. We will discuss this connectivity in the following sections: 2.4.1, “OS/390 components” on page 54 2.4.2, “Windows servers connection” on page 57 2.4.3, “Object registration process” on page 60 2.4.4, “Bulk discovery” on page 62 2.4.5, “Command support” on page 682.4.1 OS/390 components Source/390, which resides on a z/OS system, enables the monitoring and management of OS/390 and z/OS systems. Source/390 components are: Source/390 Object Pump Source/390 Object Server Source/390 Data Space The Source/390 object pump collects event and performance data and places it in the Source/390 data space. The Source/390 object server then picks up the data and exceptions and passes them to the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager servers for subsequent processing and storing in the database. The object pump uses several mechanisms to get the feeds: NetView program-to-program interface (PPI): The object pump registers itself as the PPI listener called NETVAOP. NetView automation can write to the PPI interface and send events to IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager. This mechanism is used for z/OS subsystems such as CICS, IMS, DB2, and System Automation/390 V2. The external data interface (EDI) uses cross-memory services to pass messages and exceptions that reside on the same MVS host to IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager. Messages and exceptions are passed by EDI directly to the Source/390 object pump and are not displayed on the system console. This interface is used by the CICS transient data monitor, Tivoli Workload Scheduler for z/OS batch information, System Automation for OS/390 v1.3, and other automation products. Most of the z/OS subsystems—such as storage information (DFSMS), extended recovery (XRC), and WebSphere information—as well as general JES and z/OS information, are read through the extended MCS console interface.54 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 84. Several feeds have a specialized interface, such as: – Resource Object Data Manager (RODM): The object pump subscribes to the RODM change notification (EKGNotify) so that any RODM object changes will be notified to IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager. – CICSPlex System Manager (CPSM): The object pump actively queries the CPSM using the CPSM API interface. – Resource Monitoring Facility (RMF™): The object pump uses the GPMSERVE process to get RMF metrics for z/OS resources. – Omegamon II: The object pump interfaces with Omegamon’s 3270 exception screen and monitors the exceptions that occur.This is the start-up sequence for the address spaces of Source/390:1. First, the dataspace is started. It must show the GTM5010I message before we can proceed. The startup log for the data server is shown in Figure 2-11. GTM5000I TBSM DATASPACE INITIALIZATION STARTING GTM4600I EXTENDED RECOVERY ENVIRONMENT ESTABLISHED GTM4110I GTMDSPC , USING ID 01 GTM5002I PROCESSING PARMLIB MEMBER: PDSC6900 GTM5101I TBSM DATASPACE CREATED, SIZE= 42467328, ORIGIN=00000000 GTM5030I MODIFY INTERFACE ESTABLISHED, CONSOLE COMMUNICATION AVAILABLE GTM5010I TBSM DATASPACE INITIALIZATION COMPLETEFigure 2-11 TBSM data server startup log2. The object server is started and connected to the data server, as seen in message GTM4041I in Figure 2-12 on page 56. It then allocates LU 6.2 sessions or a TCP/IP session. – An LU 6.2 session is indicated by message GTM7406I, and the transaction programs are initialized as indicated by the GTM7424I messages. – An IP session is indicated by messages GTM8205I and GTM8252I, as shown in Figure 2-12 on page 56. Chapter 2. Components and functions 55
  • 85. GTM7500I INITIALIZATION IN PROGRESS GTM4600I EXTENDED RECOVERY ENVIRONMENT ESTABLISHED GTM4110I GTMSRVR , USING ID 01 GTM7508I TBSM SERVER DETECTED, JOBNAME=GTMDSPC GTM4403I Q WARM STARTED, QADDR=00001000, ALET=01FF001B, SIZE=100 PAGES, ID=GTMSRVR GTM8205I GTMIPSND : READY TO TRANSMIT TO 9.3.5.11 PORT(1022) GTM8252I GTMIPRCV : LISTENING ON PORT 1024 GTM4403I Q WARM STARTED, QADDR=00071000, ALET=01FF001B, SIZE=50 PAGES, ID=GTMLOG GTM4200I ALLOCATION SUCCESSFUL, DDNAME=ACC1LOG , S99ERROR=0000, S99INFO=0000, DSNAME=GTMV2R1.SC69N.SRVR.LOG1 GTM4010I TBSM INITIALIZATION COMPLETED Figure 2-12 TBSM object server startup log 3. The object pump is started and, as indicated by the log in Figure 2-13 on page 57, it performs the following: – Issues the MONITOR command. – Allocates an MCS console, as indicated by IEA630I. – Connects to the object server, as indicated by GTM1620I. – Starts the registration process, as indicated by GTM1770I and GTM1780I.56 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 86. GTM7500I INITIALIZATION IN PROGRESS GTM4600I EXTENDED RECOVERY ENVIRONMENT ESTABLISHED GTM4110I GTMPUMP , USING ID 01 GTM7508I TBSM SERVER DETECTED, JOBNAME=GTMDSPC GTM4403I Q WARM STARTED, QADDR=00066000, ALET=01FF0010, SIZE=10 PAGES, ID=GTMPUMP GTM7801I STORAGE ALLOCATED FOR 10,016 TRAPS GTM7524I VTAM 3270 SERVICES ARE NOT AVAILABLE MN JOBNAMES,T MONITOR SESS,T IEA630I OPERATOR TM39069 NOW ACTIVE, SYSTEM=SC69 , LU=TM39069 GTM7545I TM69 : SUBSYSTEM INITIALIZED GTM7815I TBSM HAS CONNECTED TO RODM : RODM GTM7890I PPI RECEIVER IS ACTIVE GTM7501I RUNNING INITIAL REXX EXEC : GTMRX004 GTM0001I TBSM INITIALIZATION STARTED - 4 Dec 2002 11:05:29 GTM0002I SYSTEM WAS IPLD ON 10/23/2002 (102302) AT 16:52:42 GTM0003I TBSM IS RUNNING ON SYSTEM SC69 GTM2101I LOG PROCESSING IS AVAILABLE. DDNAME = ACC1LOG GTM2102I DSNAME = SYSOUT(A) GTM2104I THE LOG WILL BE CLOSED AND OPENED ON THE FOLLOWING INTERVAL: 04:00:00 GTM1620I OBJECT PUMP TO OBJECT SERVER HANDSHAKE STARTED GTM0220I TBSM LOGON PROCESSING INITIALIZATION STARTED ... GTM1001I TBSM EVENT MANAGER INITIALIZATION STARTED ... GTM9520I TBSM COMMAND PROCESSOR INSTALLED GTM0990I TBSM INITIALIZATION COMPLETED GTM1770I ALL REQUIRED SHARED VARIABLES HAVE BEEN REGISTERED, PROCESSING CONTINUES GTM1780I OBJECT PUMP/OBJECT SERVER IS REQUESTING OBJECTS Figure 2-13 TBSM object pump startup log – The object registration handshake is explained from the Windows side in 2.4.3, “Object registration process” on page 60.2.4.2 Windows servers connection The connection to IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager servers is shown in Figure 2-14 on page 58. Chapter 2. Components and functions 57
  • 87. Object Server Object Server VTAM TCPIP SNA Server Event Server Event Server TP SNA Client Start MVS Sender MVS Listener MVS IP Sender MVS IP OS Listener Receive Receive Upload queue Upload queue queue queue Enqueue Proxy Server MVS Event handler Enqueue Proxy Server MVS Event handler MVS Upload Rule MVS Upload Rule Server Server Source/390 Source/390 programs programs (ksh) (ksh)Figure 2-14 Connection from z/OS to TBSM servers For the SNA connection, the Tivoli BSM MVS Listener (or ASIMVSListenerSvc) receives messages or exceptions from the z/OS system. Once the connection to the z/OS system is established by the object pump, the SNA server and the Source/390 object server attempt to allocate a conversation. When the Source/390 object pump is started, it contacts the MVS Listener. The MVS Listener is an auto-start transaction program. It is started automatically by the TPSTART program when a message is sent by the object pump after the connection between the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager and the SNA server is established. It stops when the connection is lost. The transaction program (TP) name for the MVS Listener is ACC1RCV. For the IP connection, the Tivoli BSM MVS IP OS Listener (ASIMVSIPOSListenerSvc) listens to its port, typically 1022. When a connection is detected, it spawns a thread to handle the communication.58 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 88. After the program is initialized, the MVS Listener begins to receive data from thez/OS system and looks for the existence of a queue file that has the sameidentifier as the z/OS system being monitored. For example, the queue file forSC66 is SC66.que. If the queue file exists, it begins to insert data into the file. Ifthe file is not present, the MVS Listener then initializes a message queue file andbegins to insert data into it.The Tivoli BSM MVS Event handler service (ASIMVSEventHandlerSvc)periodically checks the message queue file for data. If the data is present, itreads the message from the queue and inserts it into the database.There are some commands executed automatically during the startup ofSource/390 following a system IPL or Source/390 restart. These commandsperform such tasks as initializing Source/390, registering objects, and requestingfile status. You can also use the Source/390 command from the IBM TivoliBusiness Systems Manager console using context menus of the operatingsystem object.The automatic execution of these commands results in Source/390 sending stateinformation in the form of messages to the IBM Tivoli Business SystemsManager servers. Upon receipt of these state messages, the Tivoli BSM MVSUpload Rule Server service (ASIMVSUploadRuleSvc) evaluates the information,formulates the proper commands to send, and finally uploads the propercommand or command set to Source/390, where they are executed. The MVSUpload Rule Server service runs on the Event Server. Upload rule processing istriggered by the event handler upon inserting the event into the database.In addition to processing messages regarding the initialization of Source/390, theMVS upload rule server evaluates other conditions that are of concern to theproper execution of the Source/390 environment.When the z/OS upload is enabled, the reply message is sent back to the EventServer machine through the Tivoli BSM Enqueue Proxy Server(ASIEnqueueProxyServer), which puts the events in an upload queue file. Anexample of an upload queue file in our example environment isSC66-Upload.que. The Tivoli BSM MVS Sender service (ASIMVSSenderSvc) orTivoli BSM MVS IP Sender service (ASIMVSIPSenderSvc) checks the queuefiles and sends the message back to the Source/390. For the SNA connection, ituses the ACC1RECV transaction program, which invokes the ACC1RECVprogram in the object server address space. For the IP connection, it will connectto the object server listening port, which typically is 1023. Chapter 2. Components and functions 59
  • 89. 2.4.3 Object registration process In this section, we discuss in more detail the object registration process, which is a conversational mechanism from the object pump to the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager input component for getting an automated status of any z/OS object. Figure 2-15 shows a flow chart of the initial connection of the Source/390 to the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager input component. 01/01 OS identification OS/390 -> WinNT WinNT -> OS/390 02/12 Variable creation ENT - COMP - MACH - LPAR-OS 02/04 Request objects 02/05 02/20 02/09 TrapCreation 02/10 02/15 Omegamon RMF Registration All object traps under Batch Registration TDQ Registration For each Omegemon including each metrics the OS (STC, batch, objects in RMF profile DB2,IMS, CICS etc) Figure 2-15 Initial conversation for TBSM connection The message exchange is conducted in an internal form. You can peek on the messages in the queue files that are used by the Listener and Sender services. These queue files are stored in TivoliManagerDataQueues, and are named after the z/OS system that they belong to. For example, SC66 has a listener queue called SC66.que and a sender queue called SC66-Upload.que. The message is separated into fields with the backslash character (, ASCII x’5C’, EBCDIC x’E0’) and ended with a tilde character (~, ASCII x’7E’, EBCDIC x’A1’). The first two fields are named the format type and action type fields. The format type and action type fields uniquely differentiate the messages for usage and field contents. A sample message is given in Figure 2-16 on page 61.60 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 90. Format type - Action type fields A typical field Tilde, end of message 02 Functional command 04 Field type object identification 05 Object monitoring rest data ~520MNF64EVITCA54 C0004E4 00040 MPN30CTS20 5020Figure 2-16 Sample messageIn the case of an STC resource called NPM in our SC66 operating system, wecan see the data exchanged as shown in Figure 2-17. data sent from OS/390 1 ~66CS30 SO20866CS10 835017.64:90:3 102200002001 010 3 ~600052 00004066CS30 SO203166CS10 249536.50:21:3 102200002004 020 MPN 30I304FEI64C TS200266CS10 007029.20:41:3 102200002001 020 5 ~.9800=D ISA - 20.41.31 =EMIT - DETRAT S - MPN94EVIT CA54C0006E40 0040 data sent to OS/390 2 ~100040000 040semarfniaM 30TNE202120 ~2000 90000040OSTI3 0PMOC202120 ~3000B100004 0enihcaM66CS3 0HCAM202120 ~5000020 00040YRAMIRP3 0RAPL202120 ~60 004200004066C S30SO202120 4 ~ I404FEI64EVIT CANI54I304FEI 64EVITCA54C0 004E400040MPN 30CTS205020Figure 2-17 Queue file contentsThe object registration event occurs in the following sequence:1. When the object pump is connected to the listener, it sends the identification noting the timestamp of the event and that the operating system name is SC66. The event is received by the MVS listener and stored to the database through the MVS event handler.2. The variable registration messages are sent by the MVS sender services.3. Upon receiving the variables, the object pump sends the indication that it is ready to receive the list of objects to be monitored using the 0204 record by sending the SC66 OS’s object ID.4. ASIMVSUploadRuleSvc evaluates the message received by the listener and puts the appropriate reply message into the upload queue. ASIMVSSenderSvc reads the SC66-Upload.que file and sends it to the object pump. Chapter 2. Components and functions 61
  • 91. 5. When the event that is trapped occurs, the object pump initiates the 0201 message to inform the status change of the affected object. The following is a list of commonly used field identification: 00 Timestamp in the format of YYYYMMDDHH:MM:SS.UUUUUU 02 Object type ID, similar to the content of cid column in obj_class table 03 Object name. 04 Native key. A unique 10-character object identification that is constructed of the hexadecimal value of the object ID and the class ID. 45 State. The value that will go to the state attribute of an object. 46 Message ID that is trapped. This must also exist in the MessageDescription table. 49 Description text. By evaluating the queue files and the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager log files, you may be able to determine the problem in the object registration process.2.4.4 Bulk discovery For z/OS operation, we explain two types of bulk discovery related to populating the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager object hierarchy with resources: Bulk discovery of z/OS high-level resources from preformatted files to load to the database. Bulk discovery using dynamic discovery of subsystems and sending the information through the MVSIPListener Bulk object discovery: high-level load IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager’s operation is based on the objects that represent the relevant system resources within an enterprise. Therefore, an exhaustive discovery of all system resources is a critical step in the successful implementation of the product. Initial object placement for the z/OS mainframe is critical. A set of hierarchy resources must be defined in the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager database, and the initial hierarchy that defines the Operating System object must be present before any work can be performed. The high-level load presets this hierarchy.62 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 92. z/OS mainframe based objects can be either high-level or low-level. Thehigh-level objects, in order of top-down hierarchy, are: Complex Machine LPAR Operating system (OS)The low-level objects are all the objects below the Operating System, asdescribed in the physical hierarchy. The low-level object is defined from dynamicdiscovery from the subsystems, such as automation product or others.The high-level bulk discovery involves processing a control file that contains thestructure of each z/OS or OS/390 system. This file usually is created manually.Our definition is provided in “ITSO_Highlevel - Sample high-level load source” onpage 564. Each line in this file contains the hierarchy of each operating system.For example, for SC66, we used the following line:Mainframes/ITSO Enterprise/ITSO//SC66Machine//Primary//SC66/Mainframes is the name of the enterprise, ITSO Enterprise is its description,ITSO is the name of the Complex, SC66Machine is the machine, Primary is thename of the LPARs, and SC66 is the Operating System.The high-level load uses the ITSO_Highlevel input file. The format of each line issimply the name and description of each of the high-level object types separatedby a backslash. When we have a blank descriptions field, it is shown as a doublebackslash.To load the high-level objects into IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager, a KornShell script was executed by entering the following command at the commandprompt:sh ASILoad_Highlevel.ksh ITSO_Highlevel.txtThe contents of ASILoad_Highlevel.ksh are shown in “ASILoad_Highlevel.ksh”on page 560. After the load completed, the Resources view looked likeFigure 2-18 on page 64. Chapter 2. Components and functions 63
  • 93. Figure 2-18 The Resources view after the high-level object load Subsystem bulk discovery This process sends the files generated by the pre-discovery job to the MVS IP listener. The OS/390 program GTMAOPE0 sends the file through TCP/IP to the MVS IP listener process in Windows NT server. At the end of the file transfer, the CreateDiscoveryBatch.ksh script is triggered to prepare the file loading into the database. The GTMAOPE0 program is controlled by the parameters in the SYSIN file. The file to be downloaded is in the SYSUT1 file. A sample SYSIN for GTMAOPE0 is shown in Figure 2-19 on page 65.64 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 94. //SYSIN DD * TCP/IP_ADDRESS=9.3.187.194 TCP/IP_PORT=1021 CODEPAGE=037 COMMAND=DB2DISCOVERY CONVERT=NO TEXT=NO FORMAT=X11 /*Figure 2-19 Parameters of the GTMAOPE0GTMAOPE0 functions similarly to FTP (File Transfer Protocol). These are someof the acceptable parameters:TCP/IP_ADDRESS The address of machine that runs the MVS IP listener.TCP/IP_PORT Port number for the MVS IP listener; 1021 is the default.CODEPAGE The codepage of the OS/390 prediscovery file. This parameter is used when the conversion is needed.COMMAND Command alias that will be translated by the MVS IP listener to a certain Windows NT command.CONVERT Whether to convert the data from the mainframe codepage to the codepage of the MVS IP listener.TEXT Whether the conversion is for binary data or text.FORMAT The format code of the data, indicating what subsystem the data belongs to.The ASIMVSIPListenerSvc or Tivoli BSM MVS IP Listener service runs at theEvent Server. It receives the data from the GTMAOPE0. Some parameters haveto be customized in the Windows registry for the MVS IP listener as shown inFigure 2-20 on page 66. Chapter 2. Components and functions 65
  • 95. Figure 2-20 MVSIPListener registry definitions The following information must be put in the registry: The IP port used for the file transfer must be defined in the Port value. All the OS/390 IP addresses that connect to the IP listener must be defined as a value in the ValidClients sub-key. The translation of the COMMAND parameter of the GTMAOPE0 to Windows NT commands must be provided in the CommandAliases sub-key. The content of the current CommandAliases is shown in Figure 2-21 on page 67.66 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 96. Figure 2-21 Command aliases For the CreateDiscoveryBatch command, the -C flag activates the CODEPAGE parameter, and the -F flag activates the FORMAT parameter of the GTMAOPE0 parameters. When a pre-discovery file is received by the database server, it is saved in the Windows default temporary directory in a file called ~TVx.TMP, where x is a hexadecimal sequence number. This process is executed in three steps: The CreateDiscoveryBatch script is triggered at the end of the file transfer. It prepares the required environment to allow the Discovery Load job. It renames the temporary files as BCP files and creates a Batch record in the DiscoveryBatch table. The Discovery Load job for each subsystem reads the pre-discovery file and fills a temporary SQL table with the subsystem objects. These jobs should be scheduled regularly using the SQL Server Agent. It will trigger the Microsoft SQL Server BULK INSERT command. The Discovery Process job generates the required environment to create each object in the temporary table. At the end of this process, the job state is set to COMPLETED in the DiscoveryBatch table. This job can be started manually or scheduled using the SQL Server Agent, similar to the Discovery Load job. The Discovery Process job takes a long time to run and consumes a lot of resources, so you should schedule it to run at off-peak time. Chapter 2. Components and functions 67
  • 97. 2.4.5 Command support Command support to the z/OS systems is supported using the Tivoli NetView for z/OS. The communication path, as shown in Figure 2-14 on page 58, uses the Tivoli BSM Task Server that communicates using the NETCONV session to Tivoli NetView for z/OS. An operator can invoke a menu or command, and IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager will route the command to the task server utilizing the tgmtask utility. A NETCONV session must be maintained using a logged-in operator. Typically you would use an AUTOTASK to maintain this session. More about the setup of the NETCONV sessionis in 10.2, “Setting up Tivoli NetView for z/OS” on page 338.2.5 History server, reporting, and health monitor This section contains additional information about the optional components that IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager uses: 2.5.1, “History server” on page 68 2.5.2, “The reporting system” on page 70 2.5.3, “Health monitor” on page 742.5.1 History server The history server contains the image of the current IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager database that is not pruned overtime by the operational tasks to maintain the performance of the operational database. A history server can be set up in two ways, as shown in Figure 2-22 on page 69: Linked Server Bulk Copy Program (BCP) Note: The recommended solution is to implement the BCP method.68 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 98. Linked Server Bulk Copy Program (BCP) TBSM TBSM TBSM TBSM SQL SQL SQL SQLFigure 2-22 History server setup As you can see, these approaches use different methods to transfer data from the database server to the history server (assuming they are installed on separate machines). You should install only one of them. Linked Server approach The Linked Server approach uses Microsoft SQL Linked Server implementation to move data directly from the database server to the history server using OPENQUERY. Unlike the BCP approach, the history server does not need to have IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager installed. The Event History database is created if it does not exist. Setting up the history server with the linked server approach is much easier with the linked server approach than with the BCP approach. The reporting system is configured to retrieve historical data from the database server. This has an impact on database server performance. Optionally, the linked history server can be set up on the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager database server (single-server approach) if the environment is small. Bulk Copy Program (BCP) approach The BCP approach uses the bcp command to copy data (events) out of the database server. The bcp command transfers data to the history server and then into the database table. The history server database has to be synchronized with the database on the database server. Chapter 2. Components and functions 69
  • 99. The BCP method does the following: Moves BCP events from the primary IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager database server to the history server at five-minute (tunable) intervals. Periodically restorates the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager’s Object, Meta, and RODM databases to the history server from the primary database server. Performs cleanup on events transferred from the Object database on the primary database server to boost performance.2.5.2 The reporting system The reporting system is implemented at the history server. It uses the Microsoft Internet Information Server. The reporting system creates a directory alias in the Microsoft Internet Information Server as shown in the Internet Service Manager window in Figure 2-23. The directory is ASI, which refers to the path C:TivoliManagerASIReportsASIWeb.Figure 2-23 Microsoft IIS virtual directories70 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 100. It uses various Active Server Pages (ASPs) to connect to the Microsoft SQLServer database in the history server to show the reports.Start the Reporting System directly within the application of the IBM TivoliBusiness Systems Manager console. Select an object from any open view,right-click the object, and use Open-> Reporting System. Figure 2-24 showshow to start the Reporting System directly from an IBM Tivoli Business SystemsManager console application.Figure 2-24 Reporting system invocation Chapter 2. Components and functions 71
  • 101. This will display the Event Report Selection screen for the object you choose, as showin in Figure 2-25. Figure 2-25 Object Event Report Selection screen72 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 102. Depending on your view and the object you select, dialog windows enable you to select specific criteria for your report selection. After you make your filtering selections, click Submit to generate the report. Figure 2-26 shows the generated report using the selection criteria shown in Figure 2-25 on page 72.Figure 2-26 A generated report Chapter 2. Components and functions 73
  • 103. 2.5.3 Health monitor The health monitor keeps track of the health of IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager and enables you to view the performance and availability of IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager components. You can monitor the various services, disk utilization, database space, system queues, and connections to the various data sources. The health monitor is installed onto a machine using the base services install option. As an option you can select to install the health monitor server or health monitor client. The health monitor server is a Windows service that runs the HMSQueries.ksh and records the output in a file under the Mgmt$Output directory. The health monitor client then connects to this network share and displays system health status, as shown in Figure 2-27.Figure 2-27 Health monitor client window74 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 104. You can customize the health monitor to fit your IBM Tivoli Business SystemsManager implementation. However, the Windows registry setting must bemodified for your particular environment. Modifications for adding or deletingservices and other parameters take place in the health monitor server in theHealth Monitor registry key under the path:HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESoftware Accessible Software, Inc.Access11.0It is shown in Figure 2-28.Figure 2-28 Registry Editor for Health Monitoring profile Chapter 2. Components and functions 75
  • 105. 76 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 106. 3 Chapter 3. Database structure This chapter provides a general description about the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager database. The discussion is based on IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1 and may not apply to other versions of IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager. 3.1, “Microsoft SQL Server overview” on page 78 gives an overview of Microsoft SQL Server 3.2, “The databases” on page 80 describes IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager databases 3.3, “Object implementation” on page 80 discusses how IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager implement its objects 3.4, “Status propagation” on page 87 discusses status propagation concepts and implementation 3.5, “Agent listener resources” on page 91 describes the database extension that is used by the agent listener 3.6, “Common listener resources” on page 95 describes the database extension that is used by the common listener 3.7, “Menu and command” on page 97 discusses menu and command implementation in IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager© Copyright IBM Corp. 2003. All rights reserved. 77
  • 107. 3.1 Microsoft SQL Server overview Microsoft SQL Server is a full-function database platform that provides an advanced RDBMS processing function with a tight integration into the operating system. We used Microsoft SQL Server 2000 for our examples. Microsoft SQL Server has the following services: SQL Server engine, which is the primary process that performs the RDBMS function SQL Server agent, a job-scheduling function that automates execution of certain database functions on a given schedule Microsoft Distributed Transaction Coordinator (MSDTC), which is not used by IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager When it is initially installed, Microsoft SQL Server comes with the following databases: master: The primary database of this Microsoft SQL Server instance, which contains other databases and extended stored procedure information model: The database that will be used for creating new (empty) databases msdb: Database for SQL Server agent and log-forwarding feature information tempdb: Temporary database for creating and using temporary tables, such as tables that start with a hash sign (#) Northwind: A sample database Each of those databases is implemented initially as a single file. Each database has a log file associated with it to record any incomplete transactions. These are the important objects in the user database: Tables and indexes to store data. System tables to store database objects. The names are typically have the sys prefix. Trigger, a program that is executed on a certain condition of a row in a table, such as insertion, update, or deletion. Stored procedure, which performs a specific action that can be called as a single transaction. User defined data types and functions, which provide the user flexibility when defining new columns or variable types and new data processing routines.78 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 108. Both trigger and stored procedure are written in a proprietary language called Transact-SQL. This is a structured programming language that can imbed and execute SQL command without the need to compile it. The important tools for administering Microsoft SQL Server are: Microsoft SQL Server Enterprise Manager: a snap-in application to Microsoft Management Console that enables almost any database administration function to be performed, even launching other tools. The sample Microsoft SQL Server Enterprise Manager screen in Figure 3-1 shows the available servers with all the objects underneath them.Figure 3-1 Microsoft SQL Server Enterprise Manager SQL Query Analyzer (isqlw): An interactive program that enables execution of SQL command and displays the result. A non-GUI version of the Query Analyzer can be called from the command line using the isql command. SQL Query Profiler: A tracing tool that shows the applications accessing the database engine and the SQL statements that have been executed. This is an excellent debugging tool for a large number of components, as it enables you to see the SQL statements that are issued by each component. Chapter 3. Database structure 79
  • 109. 3.2 The databases IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager comes with pre-populated databases. Detailed installation procedure is given in 6.3, “Database server installation” on page 176. The following databases are provided: Objects The primary IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager database that stores most of the management data. As the name implies, it stores IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager objects information, attributes, and links. ASIRuleSvc Rule database that contains a mirror image of selective IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager objects for rule processing. This database offloads some heavy rule processing from the main object database, as most of the rules are not concerned with state changes. Meta Metadata database that contains the most information about IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager database objects structure, attributes, and methods. Some of the tables here are provided as views in the object database. RODM, RODMLoad Temporary loading database for SNA network objects from RODM. OPCLoad Temporary loading database for Tivoli Workload Scheduler (used to be called Tivoli OPC) data. WebServer Database for the help and reporting system resources. ObjectEvents Contains the processing queues of IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager. Each queue isrepresented in three tables: Pending<qtype>, LastProcessed<qtype>, and Processed<qtype>. ObjectQueues Not used.3.3 Object implementation IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager uses an object-oriented data structure. It implements the objects in Microsoft SQL Server relational database. Typically, an object in IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager has: Class definition and attributes Methods that can be invoked Links to other objects Our discussion provides some information about object implementation.80 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 110. 3.3.1 Important information sources Tables that show important information about IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager object structure typically reside in the Meta database, but they can be accessed through views in the Object database. Those are: obj_class Primary table that contains an object’s class definition. link_type Primary table that describes existing link types. isa_table Inheritance structure table. obj_link_table Lists all possible links between object types. link_chain Generated containment structure table. isa_chain_table Generated inheritance structure paths. method_table Lists the available methods for a specific class. Extensions to these core information tables address required new functions. These additional informational tables are not related directly to the object implementation, but provide good information about the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager object classes: Tables provided with the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager agent listener implementation: GEM_LookupCID Provides a master list of all Gxxx classes that are dynamically created and mapped to the triplet (the information about Manufacturer, Product, and Version). The triplet is the key matching attribute for the TEC integration as discussed in Chapter 7, “TEC components integration” on page 209. GEMIDLookup Provides the field key lookup for TEC-related objects, such as IP Address, TMR, and host name, so that finding an object does not require searching through multiple tables with dynamically created names Gxxxcname_C and Gxxxcname_A. GEM_DMtoCID Provides a mapping for the ‘old’ Tivoli Distributed Monitoring Version 3.6 objects implementation. Multiple DM profiles can be mapped to a single IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager class, therefore this table is necessary. Tables provided with the Common Listener implementation: CL_AutoPlacement Mapping of instrumentation to enterprise CL_LinkRules Rules for creating a link based on the cid and other attributes CL_Options Common Listener global options CL_Registration All known registered connectors Chapter 3. Database structure 81
  • 111. CL_RegistrationList List of objects registered through the common listener CL_Severities Platform-specific severity mapping to alert state CL_Stage List of staging transactions whose data resides in the tables CL_StageBulkData, CL_StageDeltaData, and CL_StageEvData CL_Status Status of staging load processes3.3.2 Object structure implementation An object is implemented as a set of tables, indexes, stored procedures, and triggers. An object class has the following primary attributes, which are stored in obj_class table: cid Class ID, which is a 4 characters name of the object class cno Class number, which is a numeric identifier for each cid cname Class name, which is the long name for a cid cdesc Class description Example 3-1 shows these attributes from the Network Region class. Example 3-1 Attributes of the Network Region class > select cid, cno, cname, description, label from obj_class where cid = NREG cid cno cname description label ---- ------ ------------- ----------------- ----------------- NREG 253 NetworkRegion Network Region Network Region (1 row(s) affected) Typically an object class will have the following tables: <cid>_ID A single row, single column table that contains the next instance ID for the specific cid. <cname>_C Primary table for the class that stores all the standard attributes for instances of this class. This table is indexed with the instance ID. <cname>_A Attribute table for all non-standard attributes of a class. <cname>_S Provides such class-wide information as status propagation information, icons, and other attributes. <cname>_V The existence of this view signifies that this is a managed object, not an abstract object that is used internally by IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager.82 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 112. Each object has links to other objects in IBM Tivoli Business Systems Managerthat are implemented as link tables. There are several important link types:PHYC Physical containment link. These are the links that build the object hierarchy in IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager’s All Resources View.LOBC Business Systems containment link. These are the links that build the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager business systems hierarchy structure.LOB This link provides a mapping from the real object class to a business system object. See 3.3.3, “Business Systems implementation” on page 84.TOPO Topology link, used for the new Topology views in IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager V2.There are other links that signify links to other object types, such as propagationinformation. See 3.4, “Status propagation” on page 87 for more about these.Links are implemented in tables. Using the physical containment for the NetworkRegion class as an example, the containment table displays the information asshown in Example 3-2.Example 3-2 Containment information for Network Region> select src_cid, dst_cid from Meta..obj_link_tablewhere src_cid = NREG or dst_cid = NREG and link_type=PHYCsrc_cid dst_cid------- -------ENT NREGIPNW NREGNREG NLOCNREG R3SY(4 row(s) affected)As you can see, only certain classes can connect to the Network Region object.Link tables are created for each class that can connect, so these are the tablesfor our example: ENT_NREG_PHYC IPNW_NREG_PHYC NREG_NLOC_PHYC NREG_R3SY_PHYC Chapter 3. Database structure 83
  • 113. The content of these link tables is reflected in a table called link. Specifically for PHYC links, the content also is reflected in a table called containment. Each object class has default stored procedures that are used for basic manipulation of the object. Typically these stored procedures are created: alloc<cid> Allocates a new ID and increment the <cid>_ID table asisp_create<cid> Creates a new instance of cid delete_<cid> Deletes an instance of cid asisp_view<cid> Retrieves instance information of an object in cid asisp_joinedview<cid> Combines a view from the view table and an arbitrary table cl_process<cid> Common listener processing for the cid Certain triggers are created to ensure data validity and consistency. There are three types of triggers: insert, update, and delete. Triggers are specific to a table, and IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager typically names the triggers t<type>_<tablename>, where type can be I, U or D. The following are some trigger examples: Most of the <cname>_C tables have update triggers that increment the revision number and set the ctime (changed time) column to the current timestamp. Most of the <cname>_C and <cname>_A tables that are monitored have insert and update triggers that will queue information to the Automatic Business System feature of IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager. Note object has an Update trigger to provide closure for external events that are closed by the Take Ownership function.3.3.3 Business Systems implementation A special class has been created for implementing provided business systems. This class is called LineOfBusiness (LOB), and is special in that: It is not part of the physical containment hierarchy (All Resources View). It can have multiple icons depending on the LOB link that exists between the object and an object in the physical containment hierarchy. It can be nested in the Business System View any way you prefer. Some propagation attributes can be modified for each instance so that it will be able to accomodate any type of business system condition. Each object that appears in the Business System View has a single type, which is derived from the LOB class. Except for the container objectsthat represent the84 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 114. original business system object, the rest of the business system objects are mapped to a real object. Therefore, we call these objects shadow objects.3.3.4 ROOT, BUSC, and LOBC objects The only ROOT object in IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager is the initial object from which all objects descend. The ROOT object has an ID of 0001. In the database, the ROOT object has two objects under it: the Business System Container (BUSC) object and the LOB Container (LOBC). There is only one instance each for BUSC and LOBC classes. The BUSC object precedes all the objects in the All resource view, which sometimes is called the physical tree. The LOBC object precedes all the business systems objects, sometimes called the logical tree.3.3.5 Object hierarchy IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager has two types of object hierarchy: containment and inheritance. The containment hierarchy enforces what object can be a descendant of an object, while the inheritance hierarchy provides the inheritance feature of the object-oriented programming. Chapter 3. Database structure 85
  • 115. Figure 3-2 on page 86 shows a sample of the containment hierarchy. Enterprise Complex Network Region Network Location Batch Schedule Machine Batch Job Set Set LPAR Batch Schedule NT Server UNIX Network Node OS Batch Job File GEM objects IDMS Sybase STC R3 MQSeries R3 DB MQManager CICS IMS DB2 R3 AS objects objects MQ Queue MQ Channel MQ ProcessFigure 3-2 Part of TBSM containment hierarchy86 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 116. The inheritance hierarchy has several abstract object classes. Part of the inheritance hierarchy is shown in Figure 3-3 on page 87. Base Directly Contained Windows Viewable CICS Object DB2 base MVS Registerable Object Object Event MVS Job Managed Object Exception Message STC Managed Object 2 RODM Managed SNMP Managed IMS Base GEM Base SC Object Object GEM GEM SC GEM DM SC GEM Generic SC GEM MF SC GEM Extended Generic SCFigure 3-3 TBSM inheritance hierarchy3.4 Status propagation One of the main features of IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager is status propagation, the ability to aggregate the status of objects into meaningful information in the business systems. Here we discuss the database implementation and the details about how status propagation works. This concept is very important when you design a business system that you want to reflect meaningful conditions. In IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager, the status of an object will be propagated upward in its hierarchy. Figure 3-4 on page 88 shows the propagation concept in IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager. Chapter 3. Database structure 87
  • 117. nt e ev ild Ch Exception m atrix High M edium Low Red Yello w O bject C hild Event m atrix A lert S tate Hig h M ediu m Low S tate Red P rio rity Ye llo w e t en io n ag ev pt ss ild ce Me Ch ExFigure 3-4 The propagation concept Propagation is an incident that occurs when a IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager object receives an event. The event can be a message, an exception, or a child event. Each IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager object has the following attributes that relate to the propagation mechanism: Alert State The object property that defines the color-coded status of the object. The alert state can have the value of Green, Yellow, or Red. State The presumed actual state of the object in the enterprise. State values are dependent on the object type. For example, a DASD object can have the state of being Off-line, Online, or Boxed; and a Batch Job object can have the state Inactive, Running, Completed, Amended, Starting, and Stopping. Object priority Determines the priority of a child event that will be generated by this object when the propagation condition is fulfilled. The priority can have the following values: Critical, High, Medium, Low, Ignore, or Inherit from event. Propagation matrices This entity contains two types of matrices: exception and child event. An exception matrix indicates the number of exceptions of a particular alert state and the priority that88 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 118. an object has received. A child event matrix indicates the number of child events of a particular alert state and the priority that an object has received.When an event is received by an object, the following things happen: The event may change one or more of the object’s attributes. An event with the priority of Critical always generates one or more child events. An event with the priority of Ignore never generates a child event. Other priorities of an event may trigger one or more child events to another object.A generated child event has two important properties: the Alert State and priority.The Alert State of a generated child event is always equal to that of the originalevent. The priority of a generated child event is equal to the Object priority of theobject generating the child event. In the case where the Object priority isInherit from event, the generated child event priority will be the same as theoriginal event priority.The processing of an event that an object receives differs based on the event: State or message When a message is sent, it is matched with the message attribute in the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager database. A message has Alert State, State, and Priority attributes. The affected object sets its Alert State and State to those of the message. The message event always creates one or more child events to higher-level objects. Exception When an exception is received from a performance-monitoring tool, it is matched with the exception attribute in the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager database. An exception has Alert State and Priority attributes. Unless the exception priority is Critical or Ignore, the affected object changes the counter in the Exception Matrix according to the exception’s Alert State and Priority. When the exception counter in that matrix has exceeded the maximum number of exceptions for this Object type or falls below it, the object Alert State is changed accordingly, and one or more child events are generated. Child event The processing of a child event is similar to the processing of an exception. Unless the child event has the priority of Critical or Ignore, the received child event changes (add or subtract) the counter in the Child Event Matrix according to the child event’s Alert State and Priority. When the child event Chapter 3. Database structure 89
  • 119. counter in that matrix has exceeded the maximum number of exceptions for this Object type or falls below it, the object Alert State is changed accordingly, and one or more child events are generated. The propagation process can be illustrated with the flow chart shown in Figure 3-5. Event received Type Apply = Yes Alert State and Message State to Object No Priority = Yes Critical No Priority Yes = Ignore No Increase Counter in Increase Counter in Child Exception Matrix based Type = Child No Yes Event Matrix based on on its Priority and Alert Event its Priority and Alert State State Exceed Exceed Child Exception Yes Yes Event Limit? Limit? No No Apply Alert State to Object Generate Child Event Log event and continueFigure 3-5 Propagation algorithm90 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 120. The propagation has to be customized for each installation so that: Meaningful status is reflected from the workstation. This includes the correct representation of each alert status in the enterprise. Thresholding for objects gives the necessary filter for unwanted events. Certain objects that are very important will be given higher priority. Certain messages will be emphasized to show their priority.3.5 Agent listener resources This section discusses the implementation of the resources from the agent listener. The discussion is divided into: 3.5.1, “Class implementation” on page 91 3.5.2, “AMS tables” on page 933.5.1 Class implementation The agent listener objects are implemented in IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager by extending its database data structure. A new abstract object is created as the base class of the GEM objects. These classes are constructed in the hierarchy shown in Figure 3-6. (This is the inheritance hierarchy.) GEM Software Component GMSC GEM Generic GMGN GEM AMS object Distributed Monitoring GEM Mainframe GMGM GMDM GMMF GEM Generic GMGX Gxxx Gxxx Gxxx Gxxx Gxxx Gxxx Gxxx Gxxx Gxxx Gxxx Gxxx Gxxx Figure 3-6 GEM object classes in TBSM These components in IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager are defined with the class ID of Gxxx, where xxx are any alphanumeric characters. The class name is represented as Gxxxcname. As with the standard IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager class discussed in 3.3, “Object implementation” on page 80, agent Chapter 3. Database structure 91
  • 121. listener objects are implemented in a set of tables and procedures. Figure 3-7 shows the tables for object class G02H.Figure 3-7 Tables for CID G02H Some of the important tables shown in Figure 3-7 are: G02H_ID This table contains a single number that represents the highest-instance ID number in the class table. Whenever an instance is created for a class, the content of this table must be incremented. G02Hcname_C The class table that contains the instances of this class. G02Hcname_S The setting table that contains a single row representing the class-wide attributes. Some examples in this category are icon definition, message tables, and propagation matrix limits.92 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 122. 3.5.2 AMS tables For the GEM-based components, several additional tables define important information about the classes and instances. These tables can be categorized as being used for: Finding and locating GEM classes and instances Placement of object instances Automatic creation of Line of Business views These additional tables are useful for finding and locating these GEM objects: GEMLookupCID This table contains the information about GEM-based classes in IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager. These classes are named Gxxxx, with a long name of Gxxxxcname. Figure 3-8 shows the content of a GEMLookupCID table.Figure 3-8 GEMLookupCID Chapter 3. Database structure 93
  • 123. The Manufacturer, Product, and Version columns contain unique information that identifies the component. Tasklib contains the name of the Task Library where a task for this component can be invoked. Comptype indicates the type of GEM component: gem, os390, gen, or dm. GEM_IDlookup This table shows the argument that matches an event attribute with the GEM object and its parent. Figure 3-9 shows a sample content of this table. Figure 3-9 GEM_IDlookup Some instances can be located from their TCP/IP host names, the sub-source field, or from their endpoint IDs in the TMR. GEM_DMtoCID This table maps the DM profile to the GEM object class id. When an event from a DM profile is received as indicated in the sub-source slot, it will be applied to the GEM object in the specified class. Figure 3-10 on page 95 shows sample content from the GEM_DMtoCID table.94 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 124. Figure 3-10 GEM_DMtoCID The Enterprise outliner view for a GEM object has the following hierarchy: BUSC - Enterprise - Network Region - Network Location These tables are used to get the necessary information for placing the GEM object in the Enterprise Outliner. GEM_EEHostToEnterprise Maps the event enablement host name to the Enterprise object. We map our machine brewster to ITSO enterprise. GEM_LocationToRegion The Network Region object name is derived from the location. The default derivation is to take the second qualifier of the location name. GEM_HostnameToLocation The TCP/IP host name is used to obtain the Network Location parameter. The default location is derived from the second and third part of the TCP/IP host name. For example, IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager creates the following hierarchy for resources residing in ibmtiv9.itsc.austin.ibm.com: Enterprise - austin - itsc.austin - ibmtiv9.itsc.austin.ibm.com - resources3.6 Common listener resources The common listener resources are constructed as a set of tables and stored procedures. When a common listener data source first connects, it registers itself in the CL_Registration table. In our setup, we have IBM Tivoli NetView and IBM Tivoli Monitoring Common listener data sources. Therefore our CL_Registration table is shown in Figure 3-11 on page 96. Chapter 3. Database structure 95
  • 125. Figure 3-11 CL_Registration The common listener interface can send three types of transactions: Bulk data, typically sent on the initial connection to tell the common listener about all available resources from a particular source Delta data, sent regularly to update the resource in the common listener source Event data, typically sent on change of status or other important notification to IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager These transaction are sent in XML format conforming to Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP). The content is stored temporarily in the common listener staging tables CL_StageBulkData, CL_StageDeltaData, CL_StageEvData. These operations can affect two types of objects: a resource object or a link definition. An object will be created in the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager database based on the enterprise specified in the CL_AutoPlacement table. Our CL_AutoPlacement table is shown in Figure 3-12.Figure 3-12 Common listener auto placement table96 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 126. An event’s severity is mapped to the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager alert state and priority in the CL_Severities table. TEC and NetView alsohave mappings. Sample content for the CL_Severities table is shown in Figure 3-13.Figure 3-13 CL_Severities content3.7 Menu and command This chapter discusses the ability to customize commands for the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager workstation. The discussion here is divided into: 3.7.1, “Menu, menu item, and launcher” on page 97 3.7.2, “z/OS subsystems command support” on page 102 3.7.3, “Tivoli task support” on page 1083.7.1 Menu, menu item, and launcher To enhance the processing of the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager workstation installation, you may want to add custom commands to your workstation. The context menus of each object are constructed from the MenuItem and isa_chain tables. Note that two tables comprise the MenuItem: MenuItem_BASE and MenuItem_LOCAL. The tables with the _LOCAL suffix contains parameters that must be localized for translation purposes. Figure 3-14 on page 98 shows the default context menu for a DB2InstanceManager object. Chapter 3. Database structure 97
  • 127. Figure 3-14 Default context menu for DB2InstanceManager The context menu retrieves its menu entries from the MenuItem tables. It shows all menus belonging to its class and all inherited menu from its parent classes. The inheritance hierarchy is recorded in the isa_chain table. Figure 3-15 on page 99 shows sample context menu processing for a Started Task object.98 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 128. isa _ c h a in cid = S T C c id b as e _c id S TC S TC S TC M JO B S TC TREO 1 C IC S C IC S C IC S M JO B C IC S TREO ... ... 2 M e n u Ite m ob j_c id o b j_ id id c o n trol_ id la b e l p a re nt_ id o rd e r fla gs STC 0 1 c m d.ex e C om m an d 3 4.00 .0 0.00 2 TREO 0 2 http://tivm gr 1/as i/ind ex .as p D oc - in dex 6 2 2.10 .0 0.00 2 56 TREO 0 3 O nV ie w H y per V ie w H yp erV iew 9 2 7.10 .0 0.00 10 24 STC 121 4 s h.e xe K o rn s h ell 7 0.00 .0 0.00 2 M JO B 0 5 R un S tore dP roc ed ure R un Te s t 9 9.00 .0 0.00 40 96 B AS E 0 6 D oc u m entatio n 2 2.00 .0 0.00 8Figure 3-15 Context menu processingThis illustrates the process that occurs as an object is selected to obtain thecontext menu:1 Using its class ID, the application server tries to determine the command classes that match the object from the isa_chain table. The object class is matched with the component ID (cid) column, and the resulting command class is from the base_cid column. All object classes are inherited from their own command class and tree object (TREO) command class.2 The application server then checks the MenuItem table for all command classes that apply to the object class. It matches the base_cid column in the isa_chain table with the obj_cid column in the MenuItem table.As shown in Figure 3-15, the applicable fields in the MenuItem table are:obj_cid Command class. The obj_cid can be a super class of a real object.obj_id Instance ID. An obj_id of 0 applies the menu to all instances of the object. Combined, the obj_cid and obj_id identify the object that has this menu object. The BASE is a root for all objects. You can create a menu for a specific object instance.id Command ID.control_id Contains the command line, stored procedure, or command text for processing or execution. Chapter 3. Database structure 99
  • 129. label Shows the text that we see in the context menu. parent_id Indicates the parent command ID for the submenu. item_order Indicates the command order that should be shown in the menu. Commands may be stacked to nine levels. flags Describes the execution behavior of the command. Flags are binary fields that are shown as a number. The meaning of each bit in the flag fields is: 0x00000001 MI_SEPARATOR; this is a separator entry. 0x00000002 MI_COMMANDLINE; the control_id contains the command line string to be executed in the database server by CMD.EXE. 0x00000004 MI_DIALOGBOX; opens a dialog box (must define the class for Java console). 0x00000008 MI_SUBMENU; indicates that this entry is a staging entry with a submenu attached to it. 0x00000010 MI_BUILTINONITEMSELECT; reserved for menu from IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager. 0x00000020 MI_BUILTINONMENUCREATE; reserved for menu from IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager. 0x00000040 MI_DISABLEONSECURITYFAIL; disable this entry when the security flag is not completed. 0x00000080 MI_ELIMINATEOVERRIDE; eliminate this entry when there is an override menu item. 0x00000100 MI_URL; the control_id specifies a URL that will be shown using an Internet Explorer plug-in from the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager workstation. 0x00000200 MI_INVOKEMETHODINVIEW; runs method and displays the result in a class for Java console. 0x00000400 MI_ACTIVEXCONTROL; runs an activeX console (not used in the Java console). 0x00000800 MI_HYPERVIEW; invokes the hyperview engine. 0x00001000 MI_INVOKEMETHOD; invokes an internal object’s method as defined in the method table (no graphical display). 0x00002000 MI_DISABLEIFNOTEXIST. 0x00004000 MI_GRAPHVIEW.100 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 130. 0x00008000 MI_MENUBARONLY; this entry is only for the menu bar, not applicable for context menu.0x00010000 MI_INVOKEMETHODINTEXTVIEW; invokes a method and displays the resulting text.0x00020000 MI_APPLAUNCH; launches a GUI application in the workstation.0x10000000 MI_VISIBLESELF; visible for the physical object.0x20000000 MI_VISIBLEAGGREGATE; visible on an aggregate object.0x40000000 MI_VISIBLELINK; visible on a linked (business system) object.A special set of menu commands has been implemented that are called launchermenus. They are defined as a submenu for the Launch context menu. Thesecommands launch a device-specific application and specifically store thecommand line that is used in the client in the RDM_LAUNCHER table. This tablecontains platform-specific commands for each application.The commands related to menu and launcher are: AddAppLauncherEntry.sh with arguments: -n Entry name -l Platform -c Connection type -m -x Port numbers -w Timeout in seconds -r Revision number -g Command line string -a Command line argument AddAppLauncherMenuItem.sh with arguments: -n Entry name -c Class ID of the object -l Menu text -r Control ID for the menu item -a Installs menu items for all installed languages -f Specifies an input file containing new entries -m Name of the menu item (optional) DeleteAppLauncherMenuItem.sh with arguments: -n Entry name -r revision number Chapter 3. Database structure 101
  • 131. DeleteAppLauncherMenuEntry.sh with arguments: -n Entry name -c Class ID -m Name of menu item -r Remove parent menu if empty3.7.2 z/OS subsystems command support Command support has been predefined for most of the z/OS subsystems, such as DB2, CICS, or IMS. These commands are send to z/OS through Tivoli NetView for z/OS with a NETCONV session. Command are invoked using the program tgmtask from the database server. As an example, we show the implementation on a single Started Task object with the MVS Display Active command. The steps are: 1. Define a program to invoke the MVS D A,<stcname> command in NetView. This must be done because the console reply is asynchronous. 2. Define a stored procedure to invoke the tgmtask command that sends the command to NetView. 3. Define the stored procedure as a method for the Started Task object. 4. Define the menuitem to invoke the method for a StartedTask object. NetView command The NetView command is called MVSDACMD, and its content is shown in Example 3-3. Example 3-3 MVSDACMD /*REXX*/ arg stcname . PIPE NETV MVS D A,||stcname | CORRWAIT | COLLECT | CONSOLE exit All console commands must be correlated and collected into a single multi-line message and shown in the console. Stored procedure We call the stored procedure _MVSDA. Note the underscore: All stored procedures that are used as a method for an IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager object start with an underscore. The method nameis MVSDA (without the underscore).102 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 132. Example 3-4 shows the content of the SQL command to create the storedprocedure.Example 3-4 MVSDA.sql contentCREATE PROCEDURE _MVSDA @cid ClassID, @id ObjID, @ReturnCode INT = NULL OUTPUTAS RAISERROR(_MVSDA: %s, %d, 0, 1, @cid, @id) DECLARE @command NVARCHAR(255) DECLARE @OSID ObjID DECLARE @stcname NVARCHAR(8) IF @cid = LOB SELECT @cid = phy_cid, @id = phy_id FROM lob_link WHERE dst_id = @id SELECT @stcname = name FROM STC_V where id = @id SELECT @OSID = src_id FROM link WHERE link_type = PHYC AND src_cid = OS AND dst_cid = STC AND dst_id = @id AND deleted = 0 IF @OSID is NULL BEGIN SELECT _MVSDA ERROR: Cound not locate OS RETURN 8 END SELECT @command = MVSDA +@stcname EXEC @ReturnCode = asisp_tgmtask390 OS, @OSID, @command RETURN @ReturnCodeGOThe stored procedure works as follows:1. The first two arguments must be the Object CID and ID of the method invoker. The last argument must be the return code for the caller.2. Declare the necessary variables.3. If this is a business systems object, try to find the original object that invoked the method.4. Obtain the name of the started task that invoked the method.5. Find the Operating System object to which the started task belongs. Chapter 3. Database structure 103
  • 133. 6. Construct the command string and pass it to the asisp_tgmtask390 procedure to invoke it. Method definition The method can be defined using SQL commands. We use an SQI file that can generate the necessary command as shown in Example 3-5. Example 3-5 Defining MVSDA method: defineMVSDA.sqi include(BusinessObject.sqi) BEGIN_METHOD(MVSDA, Send MVS D A command,Display Active Task) METHOD_PARAM(ReturnCode, ASIVARIANT, RETURN Code, RETURN Code) METHOD_PARAM_FLAG(output) METHOD_PARAM(Results, ASIDBTABLE, Results, Results) METHOD_PARAM_FLAG(output) METHOD_PARAM_FLAG(collection) END_METHOD(MVSDA) BEGIN_METHOD_CALLERS(MVSDA) METHOD_CALLER(STC) END_METHOD_CALLERS(MVSDA) To translate the file into an executable SQL statement, use the command sh clsql defineMVSDA.sqi. This will generate the file defineMVSDA.sql that you can run through the SQL Query Analyzer. Menu item definition Now define the menu item by putting the menu in the main context menu and setting the flags MI_VISIBLESELF, MI_VISIBLELINK and MI_INVOKEMETHODINTEXTVIEW. Therefore the flag is x’50010000’ or 1342242816.104 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 134. We use the stored procedure asisp_definemenuitem to do this, and run the query through the SQL Query Analyzer, as shown in Figure 3-16. Note that we apply the menu to a specific object with obj_id of 6. If you want to apply the menu to all objects in that class set obj_id to 0.Figure 3-16 Running the asisp_definemenuitem Chapter 3. Database structure 105
  • 135. Sample result We implement the command to the GTMPUMP9 started task as shown in Figure 3-17.Figure 3-17 Invoke MVS D A106 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 136. The task parameter window is displayed. As we do not have any parameters, we just click Start as shown in Figure 3-18.Figure 3-18 Task setting window A further prompt asks for the userID and password used to access Tivoli NetView for z/OS, as shown in Figure 3-19. Figure 3-19 Tivoli NetView for z/OS prompt Chapter 3. Database structure 107
  • 137. The result is presented in the Task Monitor window as shown in Figure 3-20.Figure 3-20 Task Monitor result window3.7.3 Tivoli task support The Tivoli Framework tasks can be invoked using the tgmtask command: tgmtask -h eehost -u tmeid -k tmepw {-o tmeendpointoid|-r endpointhostname} tskname|tsklib|tskargs where eehost The event enablement or task server hostname tmeendpointoid Object id of the endpoint, in the format of <tmr num>.<dispatcher num>.0+ endpointhostname Endpoint’s label tmeid, tmepw User ID and password to access the TMR task information Task name, task library name, and task arguments108 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 138. With this capability, we can extend the menu for any distributed objects that wecan identify as belonging to a Tivoli Management Region where a task server isdefined. For simplicity, we define additional commands for resources that aredefined from TEC, where an Event Enablement host is one of the attributes.We pick up a generic object that is defined as cid of G02K and add an extensionto perform a DIR command on a Windows platform or a df command on a UNIXplatform.The tasks are similar, except that we create a Tivoli Framework task calledDIRCDrv under TBSMTasks Task Library. The script that the task runs is shownin Example 3-6.Example 3-6 Shell script for DIRCDrv task#!/bin/shif [ x"$OS" = x"Windows_NT" ] ; then CMD.EXE /C DIR C:else dffiexit 0We then define a stored procedure called _DIRCDrv as shown in Example 3-7.Example 3-7 _DIRCDrv Stored ProcedureCREATE PROCEDURE _DIRCDrv @cid ClassID, @id ObjID, @ReturnCode INT = NULL OUTPUTAS RAISERROR(‘_DIRCDrv: %s, %d’, 0, 1, @cid, @id) DECLARE @command NVARCHAR(255) DECLARE @userID NVARCHAR(255) DECLARE @tmeid NVARCHAR(255) DECLARE @epname NVARCHAR(255) IF @cid = ‘LOB’ SELECT @cid = phy_cid, @id = phy_id FROM lob_link WHERE dst_id = @id SELECT @tmeid = _EEhost, @epname = _MgedSystemName FROM G02Kcname_V where id = @id EXEC asisp_getContextUserID @userID OUTPUT IF @tmeid is NULL BEGIN SELECT ‘_DIRCDrv ERROR: Cound not locate EE host’ RETURN 8 Chapter 3. Database structure 109
  • 139. END SELECT @command = ‘tgmtask -d TME -h “‘ + @tmeid + ‘” -r “‘ + @epname + ‘” ‘ IF @userID IS NOT NULL SET @command = @command + ‘ -u “‘ + @userID + ‘” -k “********” ‘ SET @command = @command+’ “DIRCDrv|TBSMTasks|’ EXEC @ReturnCode = master..xp_cmdshell @command RETURN @ReturnCode GO We then use DefineDIRCDrv.sqi file to define the method for G02K as shown in Example 3-8. Example 3-8 DefineDIRCDrv.sqi include(BusinessObject.sqi) BEGIN_METHOD(DIRCDrv, ‘Dir of C drive’,’Display C Drive’) METHOD_PARAM(ReturnCode, ASIVARIANT, ‘RETURN Code’, ‘RETURN Code’) METHOD_PARAM_FLAG(output) METHOD_PARAM(Results, ASIDBTABLE, ‘Results’, ‘Results’) METHOD_PARAM_FLAG(output) METHOD_PARAM_FLAG(collection) END_METHOD(DIRCDrv) BEGIN_METHOD_CALLERS(DIRCDrv) METHOD_CALLER(G02K) END_METHOD_CALLERS(DIRCDrv) We run the command sh clsql DefineDIRCDrv.sqi and invoke SQL Query Analyzer to load the generated DefineDIRCDrv.sql. Then we run asisp_definemenuitem against the G02K object. This time we apply to all instances using the command: EXEC asisp_definemenuitem DIRCDrv, G02K, 0, DIR C Drive, NULL, NULL, DIRCDrv, NULL, , 1342242816110 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 140. The resulting menu item is shown in Figure 3-21.Figure 3-21 Context menu for DIRCDrv Chapter 3. Database structure 111
  • 141. The output in the Task Monitor is shown in Figure 3-22.Figure 3-22 Execution result for DIRCDrv112 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 142. 4 Chapter 4. User interface The purpose of this chapter is to give an overview of the user interfaces to the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager. It is not the intended to provide an exhaustive explanation of the interface nor to replace the User Guide. For more information about using IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager, refer to IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager: User’s Guide, GC32-0798. IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager has two user interfaces: the Java console and the Web console. These are discussed in: 4.1, “Java console” on page 114 4.2, “Web console” on page 119© Copyright IBM Corp. 2003. All rights reserved. 113
  • 143. 4.1 Java console The Java console is the primary interface for most operators that use IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager. The conceptual connectivity of the Java console is shown in Figure 4-1. Database Server Java Console Java Console Console Server Java Console Figure 4-1 Java console structure All Java consoles communicate with the Console Server, where the authentication is performed. The Console Server is the one that actually accesses the database. The Java console is launched from the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager icon shown in Figure 4-2. Figure 4-2 IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager icon When it launches, it prompts you for a user ID, password, and the host name of the Console Server, as shown in Figure 4-3 on page 115. The user ID will be authenticated to the Windows user account of the Console Server. The user also must be a member of IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager administrative groups, which determine the user’s authority within the console.114 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 144. Figure 4-3 IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager sign-on dialog The initial display for the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager Java console is shown in Figure 4-4.Figure 4-4 Welcome screen for IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager Chapter 4. User interface 115
  • 145. The left side of the welcome screen shows the list of Business Systems that a user is authorized to see. Depending on the user’s authority, more or fewer items may be listed. The primary menu is the Console menu. The menu shown in Figure 4-5 is for a Super Administrator, which has all authority. Some menu items may not appear for other types of administrators. Figure 4-5 Primary Menu for Super Administrator Workspaces are discussed in Chapter 13, “Setting up roles and security,” on page 421. This relates to a pre-customized display that you can store across logon sessions. You can keep the setting of the open windows and its status in the workspaces. Special windows that can be displayed from this menu: Task monitor Shows tasks that have been executed and the latest results. Resource type window Shows the various IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager resource types (object classes). You can modify some of their settings. All Resources Shows the physical object hierarchy that IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager is managing. Preferences Used for setting various console properties. Administrator preferences Shows the main settings for this console session. Figure 4-6 on page 117 shows a sample console with both the Business Systems and All Resources views partially expanded.116 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 146. Figure 4-6 Expanded console Here you can see various managed resources and their status. Any abnormal status is indicated using a color-coded sign over the icon. You can view each object’s properties by right-clicking the object and selecting Properties. A sample property display for a DB2InstanceManager is shown in Figure 4-7 on page 118. Chapter 4. User interface 117
  • 147. Figure 4-7 Property page of a DB2InstanceManager object In the property display you can see the events and exceptions that relate to this object, as well as its attributes and other useful information. A lesser-known feature of the Java console is its ability to go into debug mode, which provides additional information for objects and their attributes. Invoke debug mode using the key combination Ctrl+Shift+F12. In debug mode, the expanded desktop in Figure 4-6 on page 117 looks like Figure 4-8 on page 119.118 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 148. Figure 4-8 Expanded console in debug mode For more information about using the Java console, refer to IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager: User’s Guide, GC32-0798.4.2 Web console The Web console is an implementation of the Tivoli Presentation Services for IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager console. It sets itself as an intermediary between the Console Server and Web browser. In a Windows environment, the Web console installs itself into four services: Tivoli Presentation Services HTTP Server Tivoli Presentation Services HTTP Administration Chapter 4. User interface 119
  • 149. Web Services for IBM Console, a Java application server for the IBM console Server for IBM Console, the server that processes the IBM Console The primary objective of the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager Web console is to provide various Level 1/Level 2 operator views to examine the status of resources and accomplish basic troubleshooting. Usage typically takes place in short, sporadic sessions (for example, a traveling user checking the status of a critical system). The Web console server uses Presentation Services as its interface architecture, and it differs in both appearance and behavior from the regular console. An appropriate Web browser is needed to use the Web console because it runs in kiosk mode so none of the browser’s controls, such as the menu bar and tool bar, are visible. Using the Web console, operators can perform the same basic monitoring and problem determination tasks as with the regular console, and Administrators can perform additional tasks such as creating shared filters. The following information summarizes actions Web console users can perform: Manage Business Systems – View Business Systems – View Home Page Manage Events – Create event filters – Run event filters Manage Resources – Create resource filters – Run resource filters – View critical resources – View critical resources There are differences between the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager console and the Web console. For example: The Business Impact view is shown in HyperView in the regular console, while it is a Tree view in the Web console. Filters work differently in the Web console. The Web console uses the Home page concept.120 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 150. The Web console typically connects to port 8001 on the Web console Server; inour example it is 3C041. The initial page is reached by connecting to:http://3C041:8001/IBMConsoleThe resulting logon page is shown in Figure 4-9.Figure 4-9 Sign on to the IBM ConsoleThe initial user ID is called superadmin and its initial password is the wordpassword. When you sign on, it launches a new browser window for the session.The welcome screen in shown in Figure 4-10 on page 122. Chapter 4. User interface 121
  • 151. Figure 4-10 Welcome screen of the Web console The left side of the console, under My Work, lists the tasks that can be performed by a specific administrator.122 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 152. The superadmin’s list is shown in Figure 4-11.Figure 4-11 Primary options Chapter 4. User interface 123
  • 153. A user can be created using the Create User and Manage Users menu. An example of its properties is shown in Figure 4-12. Figure 4-12 User profile124 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 154. Available roles that can be associated with each user are shown on the Roles tab, as in Figure 4-13.Figure 4-13 User roles Chapter 4. User interface 125
  • 155. To start access to IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager, the Signon interface prompts you for a user ID for the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager Console Server as shown in Figure 4-14.Figure 4-14 TBSM Sign On screen126 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 156. A sample of the Business System View is shown in Figure 4-15.Figure 4-15 Business System View Chapter 4. User interface 127
  • 157. And the All Resources View is shown in Figure 4-16.Figure 4-16 All Resources View For more information about using the Web console, refer to IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager: User’s Guide, GC32-0798.128 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 158. 5 Chapter 5. Implementation planning This chapter discusses some planning tasks and information that are needed to ensure a succesful implementation of IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager. The topics are: 5.1, “Planning overview” on page 130 discusses general planning considerations 5.2, “Personnel” on page 130 discusses who should be involved in the implementation and considers who will use the solution later 5.3, “Hardware specifications” on page 132 explains some considerations that affect the specifications for the hardware that will be provided 5.4, “Network and connectivity” on page 133 shows some network connectivity requirements for IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager 5.5, “Software level and prerequisites” on page 134 lists the prerequisite software that is needed by IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager 5.6, “Operators and users” on page 138 describes the necessary considerations for setting up operators and users 5.7, “Business System requirements” on page 139 discusses how to design a business system, including comparison of the available approaches.© Copyright IBM Corp. 2003. All rights reserved. 129
  • 159. 5.1 Planning overview Almost all businesses today run on computer systems or intelligent devices that are complex and varied. They need to be maintained and monitored properly to ensure optimum performance levels and to minimize prolonged downtime of system components. This helps maintain an edge over the competition in the increasingly competitive marketplace. IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager provides just such a solution with end-to-end monitoring of the individual components that make up these systems. Component status is presented using views designed with the enterprise’s requirements and operation needs in mind. With these views, collectively referred to as Business System Views (BSVs), the enterprise can be alerted quickly to faults in its systems, prompting early corrective actions to be taken to avoid potential disaster. This section discusses the planning and preparation necessary for successful deployment of IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager. The environment can be a distributed system, a mainframe system, or the complete enterprise with both distributed and mainframe systems. We also discuss how to plan and prepare the implementation of the BSVs. The following areas must be prepared: Personnel Hardware specifications Network and connectivity Data feeds Software levels and prerequisites Operators and users Business system requirements We will discuss each area in the following sections.5.2 Personnel The implementation of IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager is a complex task in terms of both implementation time and personnel, requiring close interaction between the implementation team and administrators. Everyone involved in implementing the system should read IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager: Installation and Configuration Guide, GC32-0800.130 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 160. Additionally, the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager: Administrator’s Guide,GC32-0799 is required reading for both implementers and the system’sadministrators.Implementation involves various roles: Implementation team: Consists of core IT personnel from the enterprise whose combine their expertise with the information in the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager: Administrator’s Guide, GC32-0799 and IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager: Installation and Configuration Guide, GC32-0800. They will interface with the services implementation team. Typical implementation team members are: – Mainframe system programmer – Network system programmer – Database (IMS/DB2) system programmer – Database (IMS/DB2) administrator – CICS system programmer – Job scheduler – Tivoli Framework administrator – Network/LAN administrator – Windows system administrator Input providers: Provide input about how to customize and implement various IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager functions. The implementation team may consult them as potential IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager operators, but they do not perform software customization. They may be asked to attend operator sessions. An input provider may be a: – System operator – Helpdesk representative – Business function manager – Executive assistant – User representative – Application designer – System analyst – IT manager – Problem and change coordinator Administrators: Maintain IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager systems on day-to-day basis. They must read and understand the IBM Tivoli Business Chapter 5. Implementation planning 131
  • 161. Systems Manager: Administrator’s Guide, GC32-0799. They need advanced knowledge about how IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager works and what is required for maintaining it. Depending on the implementation scope, administrators may have experience as a mainframe system programmer, Tivoli administrator, or Windows/LAN administrator. The administrator team’s skill base should include at least these three backgrounds.5.3 Hardware specifications Capacity and specifications for the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager’s servers must be decided before implementation can begin. This requires careful estimation and planning for the server’s expected workload. The implementation team should consider: Implementation type: enterprise (mainframe and distributed) or only distributed Number of events Number of objects to be managed Number of operators Number of Business System Views Activation of certain functions When planning for the number of machines that your system will require, include the following considerations: Database server: This has to be the machine with fastest processors and most memory. Propagation server and console server: For a mainframe and distributed environment, separate machines are recommended for the two servers. In a distributed-only environment, they can be combined on the same machine. Event server and SNA server: These two machines are recommended for SNA connectivity to the mainframe, while for IP connectivity to the mainframe, you can have only an event server, or you can split the event server’s receiving and sending functions between two servers. History server: This is recommended in the enterprise environment, while it is optional for the distributed environment. Testing and quality assurance servers: These servers are needed for testing instrumentation and feeds for new resources before they are released for production. For a standard enterprise environment, this can be implemented over three servers.132 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 162. Failover capability: The capability to switch back and forth between two sets of production machines requires you to double the number of operational servers (excluding the testing and quality assurance servers). Health Monitor Server (HMS): Although it would not consume a large amount of system resources, implementing the HMS on the same systems that run the services and processes it monitors is not recommended. Therefore, HMS should be installed on the history server so it has no direct impact on normal IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager processing. For more discussion about the number of servers and their specifications, read the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager: Installation and Configuration Guide, GC32-0800.5.4 Network and connectivity As IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager collects information feeds from multiple system management platforms and its workload is distributed on different servers across the enterprise, well-implemented network and connectivity are essential. Be sure to establish a formal arrangement for networking support with your Network Support group before beginning implementation. Networking infrastructure and connectivity considerations include: Local area network (LAN) type: Is this an Ethernet or token ring infrastructure or both? A full-duplex fast Ethernet card is recommended, with a suitable hub or switch to be used exclusively by the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager servers. This enables faster communication between IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager servers. IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager uses TCP/IP network connectivity. Each IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager server must have a static IP address. Will the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager environment to be in its own network domain or part of a shared one? Is the other set of failover servers, if applicable, in another domain? Is there any firewall and/or router, with or without DNS? Another connectivity issue concerns IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager’s use of Windows networking. This requires a proper setup of Windows security, such as Active Directory. Applicable user accounts should be set up with appropriate access authority prior to this implementation. Chapter 5. Implementation planning 133
  • 163. 5.5 Software level and prerequisites IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager collects information from multiple subsystems. This is called an information feed, and it is based on specific levels of software. You must collect the various data feeds and their software levels to ensure easier integration into IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager and identify discrepancies early. This section discusses software prerequisites for distributed and mainframe systems.5.5.1 Planning for distributed systems Complete understanding of an enterprises distributed systems is required to integrate IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager into the distributed system environment. IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager supports two basic interfaces for collecting distributed event data: An integrated interface with Tivoli Enterprise Console (TEC) using the event enablement service. Data sources that route events through TEC include: – Application Policy Management (APM) instrumentation for heartbeat and threshold events – Generic events initiated from rule engine ihstttec – Tivoli Manager for products – IBM Tivoli Monitoring modules Common listener service. Data sources that route events through the common listener service include: – IBM Tivoli Monitoring (ITM) – IBM Tivoli NetView – Tivoli Workload Scheduler v8.1 – PATROL – CA-Unicenter TNG For IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager to recognize distributed resources, they must be mapped to defined resource types within IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager.134 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 164. The tables and checklists in this section serve as a guide to preparing for deployment of IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager for a distributed system environment. Tivoli software inventory From the Tivoli Framework, you can issue wlsinst command to check the prerequisites for your Tivoli software level. ITM profile information To collect information about either your Tivoli Distributed Monitoring or IBM Tivoli Monitoring profiles and their monitoring contents, use the wlookup command to obtain the profile name: wlookup -ar SentryProfile wlookup -ar Tmw2kProfile With the profile name, you can collect the profile’s contents. TEC classes and rules You must list all BAROC classes and rules to: Identify which class you want to monitor Decide on is the monitoring mechanism Match creation and clearing of event NetView network structure You must obtain the primary maps and sub-areas that NetView monitors.5.5.2 Planning for mainframe systems The tables and checklists in this section will serve as a guide to prepare for a deployment of IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager for mainframe environment. The required information is presented in the following checklists: “Mainframe and Logical Partition (LPAR) information” on page 136 “Subsystem information and naming convention” on page 137 “Subsystems checklist” on page 137 Chapter 5. Implementation planning 135
  • 165. Mainframe and Logical Partition (LPAR) information This information regarding the number and type of physical mainframes and the LPARs defined on these machines usually can be obtained from the mainframe System Support team. A sample is shown in Table 5-1. Table 5-1 List of mainframe information Operating System id (SMF SC66 MVS1 id) Complex ITSO Boulder Machine SC66Machine RETAIN-Test LPAR SC66 PRIMARY Operating System Version and z/OS v1.1 OS/390 v2.10 description Lab Test system 66 SysProg Test system IP address 9.12.14.22 9.99.64.54 SNA information: Not applicable Not applicable • VTAM CP • Source/390 majornode • IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager SNA server LU majornode SYSPLEX WTSCPLX1 Not applicable CICSPLEX SC66PLX Not applicable Job Entry Subsystem JES2 JES2 Network management NetView for z/OS NetView for OS/390 System Automation Not applicable SA/390 2.1 Job Scheduler TWS 8.1 Not applicable MVS perfomance monitor RMF RMF Database subsystem Not applicable DB2 and IMS Transaction Program CICS Not applicable subsystem Subsystem performance CICSPlexSM Not applicable monitors Security RACF® RACF136 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 166. Subsystem information and naming convention If the traditional bulk discovery process is to be employed, a solid naming convention for your system will make this process simpler to find and categorize your enterprise resources. Table 5-2 Subsystem naming convention Resource Name pattern DB2 DB% IMS IMS??% CICS ?CICS?? Monitor OMEG% STC % Subsystems checklist Many of the MVS subsystems consist of further components, which are shown in the following tables. IMS Table 5-3 lists the IMS subsystems checklists for IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager implementation. Table 5-3 IMS subsystems checklist Subsystem Version OTMA OS IMS1A 7.1 Yes MVS1 IMS2A 7.1 Yes MVS1 DB2 Table 5-4 lists the DB2 subsystems for discovery.Table 5-4 DB2 subsystems checklist Subsystem Version Performance Data sharing OS Discovery monitor DB2A 6.1 DB2PM No MVS1 Yes DSN1 6.1 No No MVS1 No DSN2 6.1 No No MVS1 No DSN3 6.1 No No MVS1 No Chapter 5. Implementation planning 137
  • 167. Subsystem Version Performance Data sharing OS Discovery monitor DSN4 6.1 No No MVS1 No DSN5 6.1 No No MVS1 No CICS Table 5-5 on page 138 lists the CICS subsystems and their corresponding components. Table 5-5 CICS subsystems checklist Subsystem Version CICSPlex Performance OS monitor SC66C 7.1 SC66PLX CICSPlexSM SC66 PCICS01 7.1 Not applicable Not applicable MVS15.6 Operators and users You should identify early on who will use the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager. Console users must be identified early, as this will influence: Console server size Deployment requirements Business System View design Workspace creation You should map the following: Authority group: For each user, create a user ID in the console server machine and associate it to the appropriate IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager group Monitoring requirement: Each user in each function will need to monitor different areas, and this must be fulfilled within the appropriate structure of Business System View and workspace. Some examples are: – Helpdesk needs to see overall system health – Operators needs to monitor the IT system they are responsible for – Business function managers need to see their business system – IT managers need to see the IT equipment – Network administrator only need to see the status of network devices138 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 168. Action requirement: Some operators may need a special ability to issue an action to an object, so consider addressing this in the implementation.5.7 Business System requirements IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager offers two types of views: All Resources View and Business System View. The All Resources View, sometimes called the physical view, represents the actual enterprise structure. Business System Views (BSVs) are created with managed objects from the physical view. Business System objects are additional representations of the physical objects that exist within the enterprise; specifically, a link to the actual object that resides within the All Resources View. Each link contains a set of filters and controls, so data coming into the Business System object is the only data that is important to the BSVs author. Operations performed on the physical object affect the object in the created BSVs. You create Business System objects by dragging a physical object from the physical view, or another Business System object from another BSV, into the destination BSV.5.7.1 Business System View theory IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager has the capability to create logical aggregations of all the physical objects discovered within the enterprise. In order to represent critical business processes or services, the objects contained in the All Resources View can be extrapolated from their original tree and inserted into different hierarchical structures. Such new structures (Business System Views) enable you to diversify enterprise monitoring according to different IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager operators’ business interests and needs.5.7.2 Business System View design concept Designing a BSV’s structure involves understanding and accounting for the complex relationships between the objects involved and the myriad ways to represent them. This section provides our recommendations for designing correct BSVs: Create BSVs based on the need and required monitoring function of an operator or a group of operators. BSVs should provide critical business information about the collection of resources or applications the operators are responsible for managing. Create BSVs covering multiple business interests as root BSVs directly in the Business System folder so that they can be reused and incorporated in other BSVs. Dragging and dropping a child BSV into another one results in Chapter 5. Implementation planning 139
  • 169. propagation errors because the child event from the original BSV does not propagate in the dragged BSV. Drag objects to BSVs directly from the original objects in the All Resources View to avoid having objects in the DELETED state when the original object is deleted. Propagation of a child event does not happen to a leaf node (an object dragged into a BSV that has children in its physical view, such as a DB2 subsytem), so when the physical object turns red because of a child event, its corresponding leaf node does not change. Indeed, the leaf node mantains a link with its children. Opening certain IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager views (Managed Resources view, Event Viewer) on the leaf node in the BSV enables you to see all the object children as if you had dragged them all. However, dragging another object under the leaf node (for example a DB2 database under a DB2 subsystem) breaks the existing link between the leaf node and its children. Some objects, such as the network interface, can represent the status of the original hosts. When a networked application cannot connect to the machine, the machine is practically useless. Therefore any component of an application in a machine will have the network interface as a critical dependent. The BSV Properties view must be adjusted to match the required priority and the threshold of the child event. Setting the individual priority of each object in the BSV must be evaluated and matched with the BSV’s child event threshold.5.7.3 Business System View structure BSVs can contain resources directly or affect the BSV. Several methods can be used to implement these configurations, so we will give an example to illustrate the difference between the two approaches. The WorldBank Remote Banking application depends on two Web servers, castore and polluce, running the RemoteAccess service. The core of the RemoteAccess application is the APPL CICS transaction that accesses the database HYPERDB under the DB2 Subsystem to grant user remote access. Remote Banking’s BSV consists of: Remote Access service on castore Remote Access service on polluce HYPERDB DB2 database APPL CICS transaction140 Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1: End-to-End Business Impact Management
  • 170. The BSV also indirectly depends on other resources, such as: Network Interface NetCom for castore and polluce, to ensure that the Web servers are online MVS1 operating system JRLM DB2 subsystemThe BSV can be implemented variously as: No hierarchy: Using this method, all resources that the BSV depends on are laid out flat under the BSV object. Figure 5-1 shows the conceptual BSV structure.Figure 5-1 Flat BSV for Remote Banking Chapter 5. Implementation planning 141
  • 171. Original hierarchy: Using this method, all resources are laid out under the BSV according to its physical tree hierarchy. The objects that affect the BSV directly are listed as the leaf node of the BSV tree. Figure 5-2 shows the conceptual B