Solution deployment guide for ibm tivoli composite application manager for web sphere sg247293
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Solution deployment guide for ibm tivoli composite application manager for web sphere sg247293

on

  • 1,130 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,130
Views on SlideShare
1,130
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
9
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Solution deployment guide for ibm tivoli composite application manager for web sphere sg247293 Solution deployment guide for ibm tivoli composite application manager for web sphere sg247293 Document Transcript

  • Front coverSolution Deployment Guide forIBM Tivoli Composite ApplicationManager for WebSphereQuickly start a services engagementwith ITCAM for WebSphereStatement of work samples andscope development assistanceIncludes sample code andinstallation instructions Budi Darmawanibm.com/redbooks
  • International Technical Support OrganizationSolution Deployment Guide for IBM TivoliComposite Application Manager for WebSphereDecember 2006 SG24-7293-00
  • Note: Before using this information and the product it supports, read the information in “Notices” on page vii.First Edition (December 2006)This edition applies to Version 6, Release 0 of IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager forWebSphere (product number 5724-L62).© Copyright International Business Machines Corporation 2006. All rights reserved.Note to U.S. Government Users Restricted Rights -- Use, duplication or disclosure restricted by GSA ADPSchedule Contract with IBM Corp.
  • Contents Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii Trademarks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix The team that wrote this book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix Become a published author . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . x Comments welcome. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . x Chapter 1. IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere solution offering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.1 Services solution overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.2 ITCAM for WebSphere concepts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.2.1 Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1.2.2 Supported platform overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 1.3 ITCAM for WebSphere solution. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 1.3.1 Solution overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 1.3.2 Software components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 1.3.3 Suggested hardware configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 1.4 Document organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Chapter 2. Planning for customer engagement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 2.1 Services engagement preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 2.1.1 Implementation skills. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 2.1.2 Available resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 2.2 Solution scope and components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 2.2.1 Basic solution definition. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 2.2.2 Cross-sell and up-sell opportunities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 2.3 Services engagement overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 2.3.1 Executive Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 2.3.2 Demonstration system setup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 2.3.3 Analyze solution tasks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 2.3.4 Creating a contract . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 2.4 Defining solution timing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 2.4.1 Environment analysis tasks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 2.4.2 WebSphere application management tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 2.5 Statement of work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 2.5.1 Environment analysis service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 2.5.2 WebSphere application management service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33© Copyright IBM Corp. 2006. All rights reserved. iii
  • Chapter 3. Demonstration of ITCAM for WebSphere . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 3.1 Demonstration system setup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 3.1.1 Installing application environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 3.1.2 Installing ITCAM for WebSphere environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 3.1.3 Setting up management resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 3.1.4 Running the application load generator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 3.2 WebSphere Application Server monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 3.3 Generating performance report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Chapter 4. Implementation of ITCAM for WebSphere service. . . . . . . . . . 47 4.1 Install the managing server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 4.2 Modify the managing server for the other site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 4.3 Install data collectors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 4.4 Customize the management environment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 4.4.1 IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere . . . . . . 71 4.4.2 Activating data collection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 4.4.3 Defining server groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 4.4.4 Defining operators. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 4.5 Run initial data collection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 4.6 Collect performance reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 4.7 Run detailed data collection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 4.7.1 Scheduling monitoring level changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 4.7.2 Getting transaction trace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 4.7.3 Performing lock analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 4.7.4 Performing memory leak analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 4.8 Develop the finding report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 4.9 Remove the data collector. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 Chapter 5. Complementary solutions for ITCAM for WebSphere engagement. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 5.1 Cross-sell and up-sell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 5.2 Additional solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 5.2.1 Managing and analyzing response time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 5.2.2 Working with messaging infrastructure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 5.2.3 Managing Web Services and SOA infrastructure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 5.3 Enhancement solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 5.3.1 Enabling a split server for load balancing and reliability . . . . . . . . . 109 5.3.2 Security enhancement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 5.3.3 Integrating performance monitoring with the portal solution . . . . . . 110 5.3.4 Collecting performance information in Tivoli Data Warehouse . . . . 110 Appendix A. Additional material . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Locating the Web material . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Using the Web material . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111iv Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • System requirements for downloading the Web material . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 How to use the Web material . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112Abbreviations and acronyms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113Related publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115IBM Redbooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115Other publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115Online resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116How to get IBM Redbooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117Help from IBM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 Contents v
  • vi Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • NoticesThis information was developed for products and services offered in the U.S.A.IBM may not offer the products, services, or features discussed in this document in other countries. Consultyour local IBM representative for information on the products and services currently available in your area.Any reference to an IBM product, program, or service is not intended to state or imply that only that IBMproduct, program, or service may be used. Any functionally equivalent product, program, or service thatdoes not infringe any IBM intellectual property right may be used instead. However, it is the usersresponsibility to evaluate and verify the operation of any non-IBM product, program, or service.IBM may have patents or pending patent applications covering subject matter described in this document.The furnishing of this document does not give you any license to these patents. You can send licenseinquiries, in writing, to:IBM Director of Licensing, IBM Corporation, North Castle Drive, Armonk, NY 10504-1785 U.S.A.The following paragraph does not apply to the United Kingdom or any other country where suchprovisions are inconsistent with local law: INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATIONPROVIDES THIS PUBLICATION "AS IS" WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS ORIMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF NON-INFRINGEMENT,MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Some states do not allow disclaimerof express or implied warranties in certain transactions, therefore, this statement may not apply to you.This information could include technical inaccuracies or typographical errors. Changes are periodically madeto the information herein; these changes will be incorporated in new editions of the publication. IBM maymake improvements and/or changes in the product(s) and/or the program(s) described in this publication atany time without notice.Any references in this information to non-IBM Web sites are provided for convenience only and do not in anymanner serve as an endorsement of those Web sites. The materials at those Web sites are not part of thematerials for this IBM product and use of those Web sites is at your own risk.IBM may use or distribute any of the information you supply in any way it believes appropriate withoutincurring any obligation to you.Information concerning non-IBM products was obtained from the suppliers of those products, their publishedannouncements or other publicly available sources. IBM has not tested those products and cannot confirmthe accuracy of performance, compatibility or any other claims related to non-IBM products. Questions onthe capabilities of non-IBM products should be addressed to the suppliers of those products.This information contains examples of data and reports used in daily business operations. To illustrate themas completely as possible, the examples include the names of individuals, companies, brands, and products.All of these names are fictitious and any similarity to the names and addresses used by an actual businessenterprise is entirely coincidental.COPYRIGHT LICENSE:This information contains sample application programs in source language, which illustrate programmingtechniques on various operating platforms. You may copy, modify, and distribute these sample programs inany form without payment to IBM, for the purposes of developing, using, marketing or distributing applicationprograms conforming to the application programming interface for the operating platform for which thesample programs are written. These examples have not been thoroughly tested under all conditions. IBM,therefore, cannot guarantee or imply reliability, serviceability, or function of these programs.© Copyright IBM Corp. 2006. All rights reserved. vii
  • TrademarksThe following terms are trademarks of the International Business Machines Corporation in the United States,other countries, or both: AIX® Monitoring On Demand® Tivoli Enterprise™ CICS® MVS™ Tivoli Enterprise Console® Database 2™ OMEGAMON® Tivoli® DB2 Universal Database™ OS/400® VTAM® DB2® PartnerWorld® WebSphere® IBM® Redbooks™ z/OS® IMS™ Redbooks (logo) ™The following terms are trademarks of other companies:Enterprise JavaBeans, EJB, Java, JavaBeans, JavaServer, JavaServer Pages, JDBC, JMX, JSP, JVM,J2EE, Solaris, Sun, and all Java-based trademarks are trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc. in the UnitedStates, other countries, or both.Microsoft, Windows, and the Windows logo are trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States,other countries, or both.Intel, Pentium, Intel logo, Intel Inside logo, and Intel Centrino logo are trademarks or registered trademarksof Intel Corporation or its subsidiaries in the United States, other countries, or both.UNIX is a registered trademark of The Open Group in the United States and other countries.Linux is a trademark of Linus Torvalds in the United States, other countries, or both.Other company, product, or service names may be trademarks or service marks of others.viii Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • Preface This IBM® Redbook is written for services professionals who are responsible for developing, selling, and implementing customer-based service engagements. The book focuses on implementation services for IBM Tivoli® Composite Application Manager for WebSphere® V6.0. IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere is a performance management solution for WebSphere Application Server-based applications. It enables monitoring of various performance aspects of WebSphere Application Servers and provides valuable assistance in finding and removing application bottlenecks. This implementation service for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere is suitable for customers with multiple mission-critical applications deployed on WebSphere Application Server. This book explains the fundamental aspects of services engagement and Statement of Work creation. We explore in detail how to analyze the effort required for implementing the solution. We also provide several additional add-ons that you might be able to package in the implementation service. This book is meant to be used in conjunction with Deployment Guide Series: IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere V6.0, SG24-7252. We will not cover deployment in detail; we are more focused on building the service engagement package.The team that wrote this book This book was produced by a team of specialists from around the world working at the International Technical Support Organization, Poughkeepsie Center. Budi Darmawan is a Consulting IT Specialist at the International Technical Support Organization, Austin Center. He writes extensively and teaches IBM classes worldwide about all areas of systems management and Tivoli solutions. Before joining the ITSO in 1999, Budi worked as lead implementer and solution architect in IBM Indonesia Integrated Technology Services, IBM Global Services. His current interests include availability management, z/OS® administration, and Java™ programming.© Copyright IBM Corp. 2006. All rights reserved. ix
  • Thanks to the following people for their contributions to this project: Betsy Thaggard International Technical Support Organization, Poughkeepsie Center Elizabeth Purzer IBM Software GroupBecome a published author Join us for a two- to six-week residency program! Help write an IBM Redbook dealing with specific products or solutions, while getting hands-on experience with leading-edge technologies. You’ll team with IBM technical professionals, Business Partners, and/or customers. Your efforts will help increase product acceptance and customer satisfaction. As a bonus, you’ll develop a network of contacts in IBM development labs, and increase your productivity and marketability. Find out more about the residency program, browse the residency index, and apply online at: ibm.com/redbooks/residencies.htmlComments welcome Your comments are important to us! We want our Redbooks™ to be as helpful as possible. Send us your comments about this or other IBM Redbooks in one of the following ways: Use the online Contact us review redbook form found at: ibm.com/redbooks Send your comments in an e-mail to: redbook@us.ibm.com Mail your comments to: IBM Corporation, International Technical Support Organization Dept. HYTD Mail Station P099 2455 South Road Poughkeepsie, NY 12601-5400x Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • 1 Chapter 1. IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere solution offering This chapter discusses some initial concepts regarding the ITCAM for WebSphere solution that you will be able to define, sell, and implement for your customer environment. The discussion in this section includes: 1.1, “Services solution overview” on page 2 1.2, “ITCAM for WebSphere concepts” on page 2 1.3, “ITCAM for WebSphere solution” on page 9 1.4, “Document organization” on page 11© Copyright IBM Corp. 2006. All rights reserved. 1
  • 1.1 Services solution overview This IBM Redbook provides a comprehensive guide to developing and deploying a services solution offering based on ITCAM for WebSphere. The solution is targeted for small and mid-market businesses (SMB). Because many of these businesses do not have IT staffs, they rely on trusted advisors like you. Delivering complete and working solutions from the start in a minimal amount of time can help you establish long and prosperous relationships with these companies. This services solution guide is developed specifically for Business Partners. It is designed to help you reduce the time and investment that are necessary before you can begin selling and implementing solutions. Resellers face certain challenges in trying to exploit opportunities. Identifying and assembling all of the relevant pieces that make up a meaningful solution individually—hardware, software, networking installation, and configuration—can be time-consuming and cumbersome tasks and might not be fully chargeable to the customer. Solutions can be complex, and many demand high skill levels in sales, service, and support. The additional value-add for you consists of a set of offering-specific scenarios, service offerings, documentation, and templates that enable you to provide a high level of services and, therefore, increase the profitability of a solution sale. A typical SMB relies on value-add resellers or consultants to provide a ready-to-go, affordable, customized Web-based business solution to solve immediate business problems. Before we proceed into the offering itself, we spend some time defining ITCAM for WebSphere.1.2 ITCAM for WebSphere concepts ITCAM for WebSphere is an application management tool that helps maintain the availability and performance of on demand applications. It helps you quickly pinpoint, in real time, the source of bottlenecks in application code, server resources, and external system dependencies. This product also provides detailed reports that you can use to enhance the performance of your applications. ITCAM for WebSphere provides in-depth WebSphere-based application performance analysis and tracing facilities. ITCAM for WebSphere enables multiple levels of analysis in order to achieve a complete view of the application, depending on the need. From the production-level monitoring through detailed heap and method debugging, it digs2 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • into SQL performance analysis without the need for database monitors. It can provide SQL information and calls that were made through Java Database Connectivity (JDBC™). ITCAM for WebSphere provides a composite status correlation for transactions that use CICS® or IMS™ as the back-end system. ITCAM for WebSphere V6.0 evolved from WebSphere Studio Application Monitor and OMEGAMON® XE for WebSphere. ITCAM for WebSphere observes and reports on the health of J2EE™-based applications. It tracks the progress of applications as they traverse through J2EE application servers, middleware adapters and transports, and database calls, and on to back-end systems such as CICS or IMS to extract business data or to invoke mainframe business processes. The tracking of applications produces request traces, where the events in a request’s life are recorded and stored in a monitoring repository database. ITCAM for WebSphere captures the CPU and the elapsed internal times when events are called and when they are exited, measuring as far down as the CPU times consumed and the elapsed internal times charged to individual methods in J2EE classes. The methods or events taking the most time are marked as an application’s parts that deserve attention for runtime improvement studies and code optimizations. ITCAM for WebSphere does not need modification of any application code. Java Virtual Machine Tool Interface (JVMTI) interfaces and primitives, along with WebSphere Performance Management Interface (PMI) and z/OS System Measurement Facility (SMF) 120 records, are ITCAM for WebSphere’s principal data sources. The monitoring data is collected and analyzed to offer a wealth of information about the health of J2EE applications and their servers. Many system-level performance metrics are collected and reported about J2EE application servers. The status of the servers and their resources (particularly at vital checkpoints such as CPU utilization), memory usage, and the status of internal components such as database connection pools, JVM™ thread pools, EJB™ usage, and request processing statistics can be very useful and important for locating real-time problems with J2EE applications. ITCAM for WebSphere brings attention to these critical indicators with real-time, graphical displays of their values and their trends over time.1.2.1 Components ITCAM for WebSphere is a distributed performance monitoring application for application servers. Its components are connected through TCP/IP communication. The central component of ITCAM for WebSphere, the managing server, is its heart and brain. It collects and displays various performance information from application servers. The application servers run a component of ITCAM for WebSphere called the data collector (DC), which is a collecting agent Chapter 1. IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere solution offering 3
  • that runs in the application server and sends monitoring information to the management server. These data collectors operate independent of each other. Figure 1-1 shows the overall architecture of ITCAM for WebSphere. Browser interface ITCAM for WebSphere Managing Server I Web Server Tivoli Enterprise Management Server and Application servers with Tivoli Enterprise ITCAM for WebSphere Portal Server Data collectors Figure 1-1 ITCAM for WebSphere architecture ITCAM for WebSphere has the following components: The managing server Acts as the central component that manages and administers the data collectors. It stores that data in a relational database repository. A Web-based application is provided to show the monitoring results; this interface is also called the visualization engine. We discuss the managing server in “The managing server” on page 5. Data collectors run on the application servers that are being monitored. They collect performance information for the managing server. These data collectors operate independent of each other. They are discussed in “WebSphere data collector” on page 6. Tivoli Enterprise Monitoring Agent collects information that shows the status of the WebSphere server and sends this information to the Tivoli Enterprise Monitoring Server for display via the Tivoli Enterprise Portal. Tivoli Enterprise4 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • Monitoring Agent is installed on the individual machines where the data collector resides. The managing server ITCAM for WebSphere managing server (MS) controls and coordinates data collectors for J2EE, CICS or IMS servers that run applications. The managing server consists of the following software: The X-Windows Virtual Frame Buffer (Xvfb) graphics package Managing server database, DB2® UDB, or Oracle (on Sun™ Solaris™) for storing data relationally J2EE server to run the ITCAM for WebSphere graphical console application An optional Apache Web server, such as IBM HTTP Server ITCAM for WebSphere managing server overseer components, which are a set of Java-based components The ITCAM for WebSphere overseer components are the controlling logic for the managing server: The kernels control the managing server. There are always two copies of the kernels running on an ITCAM for WebSphere managing server for redundancy and failover. The kernels register components as they join the managing server, periodically renew connections and registrations with components and data collectors, and collect servers and component availability information. The publishing servers receive application and system event data from the data collectors, gather and compute request-level information about performance metrics such as response times, and implement the trap monitoring and alerts features. The archive agents receive monitoring data from the publishing servers, and store the monitoring data in ITCAM for WebSphere’s repository. The global publishing server collects information from the publishing servers, and correlates all parts and pieces of multi-server requests, like requests from J2EE servers to execute CICS or IMS programs. The message dispatcher is a conduit for messages from ITCAM for WebSphere using e-mail and SNMP facilities. The polling agents collect data from Web Servers for Apache 2.0 and above. The visualization engine is a Web-based GUI with access to graphics, ITCAM for WebSphere performance reports, real-time views of different slices of monitoring data, and access to ITCAM for WebSphere internal commands asChapter 1. IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere solution offering 5
  • well as event-driven functions. The visualization engine runs on a J2EE server, such as WebSphere Application Server. Figure 1-2 shows the conceptual relationship between the components. Snapshot traffic Publish traffic Global Publish Server (SAM) Publish Server (PS) Kernel (KL) Visualization Engine Message Dispatcher Provide services on: Provide services on: (MD) - Lookup -Administration - Registration -Availability - Recovery -Problem Determination Archive Agent (AA) - Configuration -Performance Management Polling Agent (PA) OCTIGATE databaseFigure 1-2 Kernel components When it reaches the managing server, monitoring data is prepared for real-time displays within the monitoring console and is inserted into the ITCAM for WebSphere data repository. These are very resource-intensive operations; moving them to a standalone distributed server (or servers) isolates them from other enterprise activities, thus reducing ITCAM for WebSphere’s system resource footprint in the monitored systems. This design also helps keep ITCAM for WebSphere’s processing overhead at levels low enough for 24x7 production system monitoring. Data from the distributed data collectors is collected by the publishing server and then stored in the OCTIGATE database by the archive agent. The Visualization Engine reads the database in order to present data through the Web console, while snapshot information such as lock analysis and in-flight transaction are retrieved directly from the data collectors. WebSphere data collector Data collectors run inside the application servers. They use native system services, and they are tailored for the particular environments where they execute. The data collectors for z/OS systems are written to take advantage of services on z/OS, such as MVS™ Cross-Memory Services and address space fencing, which are not available on distributed systems.6 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • Data collectors have two agents: Command agent The command agent collects requests from other components for information about EJB invocations, database connection pools, thread pools, stack traces, memory analyses, and heap dumps. Event agent The event agent provides data to the publish servers according to polling frequencies. This data includes system initialization data, application request-level data, and application method-level data. Collectively, these agents and other data collector routines unleash the probes, package the monitoring data into Java formats for the managing server, and deliver the data to the managing server. The data collectors send the probes into the application servers to analyze the applications’ performance. The probes collect monitoring data and feed it to transport routines that in turn route the data to the managing server. The managing server processes this data for appropriate display in the ITCAM for WebSphere console and for storage in the OCTIGATE repository. This relieves the processing burden of ITCAM for WebSphere from the application servers as much as possible. The data collectors and probes are not designed to analyze or interpret data, but to collect it and route it as quickly as possible to the managing server where the analysis is performed. The data sources employed by ITCAM for WebSphere are: JVMTI garbage collection data, method trace, stack trace, CPU time, and heap dump JMX™ system resources SMF system resources (z/OS only) PMI system resources OS services SCC, platform CPU, and its environment Byte Code Modification (BCM) instrumentation of some classes The data collector in a J2EE server runs as a custom service called am. Figure 1-3 on page 8 shows the conceptual data collector structure.Chapter 1. IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere solution offering 7
  • WebSphere JVMTI JMX PMI Custom Service bcm Publish data am KYN Tivoli Enterprise To TEMS Monitoring Agent Figure 1-3 J2EE data collector structure Tivoli Enterprise Monitoring Agent The Tivoli Enterprise Monitoring Agent enables WebSphere performance information to be relayed to Tivoli Enterprise Monitoring Server and showed using Tivoli Enterprise Portal. This facility replaces the data collector mechanism employed by OMEGAMON for WebSphere Application Server. The Tivoli Enterprise Monitoring Agent communicates to the data collector in the local machine and retrieves performance information. Tivoli Enterprise Monitoring Agent reports the information to Tivoli Enterprise Monitoring Server. For more information about the Tivoli Enterprise Monitoring Server and IBM Tivoli Monitoring V6.1 architecture, read Getting Started with IBM Tivoli Monitoring V6.1, SG24-7143.1.2.2 Supported platform overview For a complete platform coverage list, refer to the following Web site: http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/tividd/td/ITCAMWAS/prereq60/en_US/HTML/it cam6.html Table 1-1 on page 9 shows the supported platform overview for ITCAM for WebSphere V6.8 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • Table 1-1 ITCAM for WebSphere supported platform overview Component Software Managing server operating AIX® 5.2, 5.3 system Solaris 9 cluster, 10 cluster HP-UX 11iv1 RHEL 3.0, RHEL 4.0, SLES 8, SLES 9 Windows® 2000 Server or Advanced Server with SP4 Windows 2003 Server SE/EE Managing server database DB2 7.2 EE/EEE FP11 DB2 8.1 ESE FP6 DB2 8.2 ESE Oracle 9i S/E R2 9.2+ Oracle 10g Managing server WebSphere Application Server 5.1.1 and above or WebSphere WebSphere Application Server 6.x Data collector platform Windows 2000 Pro SP4 Windows 2000 Server or Advanced Server with SP4 Windows 2003 Server SE/EE AIX 5.2 and 5.3 RHEL 3.0 and 4.0 SLES 8 and 9 Solaris 8, 9, 10, Solaris 9 Cluster HP-UX 11iv1 RFAS 4.0 and 4.1 OS/400® V5R2 and V5R3 z/OS 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, or 1.7 CICS CTG 5.0.1 or 5.1 and 1.3, 2.2, 2.3 or 3.1 IMS 7.1, 8.1 and 9.11.3 ITCAM for WebSphere solution This section discusses the solutions that we present in this book. The discussion is divided into: 1.3.1, “Solution overview” on page 10 1.3.2, “Software components” on page 10 1.3.3, “Suggested hardware configuration” on page 10 Chapter 1. IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere solution offering 9
  • 1.3.1 Solution overview The solution provides a proactive monitoring on WebSphere Application Server J2EE environment. The solution can be a turnkey solution or a diagnostic service for the end user. The turnkey solution has you, the Business Partner, install and configure ITCAM for WebSphere on the customer hardware and leave it for the customer to operate later. This solution is typical for an enterprise that has its own IT personnel and want to manage their own environment. The diagnostic service solution has you bring your hardware to analyze customer environment and provide tuning recommendations for the customer. This solution is typical for an enterprise that wants an occasional diagnostic solution for its WebSphere environment but does not want to maintain the management environment. Both solution types include installation of ITCAM for WebSphere data collector on the customer’s production servers. The data collector will feed the managing server with necessary transaction information.1.3.2 Software components The solution consists of implementing ITCAM for WebSphere managing server and data collector to analyze WebSphere Application Server. The distributed platform product number for ITCAM for WebSphere is 5724-L62. Passport advantage media pack part number for ITCAM for WebSphere V6.0 Multi Platform is BJ0G3ML, or use the Web download option.1.3.3 Suggested hardware configuration The following list is a suggested hardware configuration for use with ITCAM for WebSphere managing server: Intel® Pentium® or equivalent processor (733 MHz or higher) 3 GB RAM 20 GB available disk space The recommended configuration for a production ITCAM for WebSphere managing server could vary depending on your customer’s requirements.10 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • 1.4 Document organization Farther into this book, you can find various information to help you build your service offering regarding ITCAM for WebSphere solution. This book has the following chapters: Chapter 1, “IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere solution offering” on page 1 Chapter 2, “Planning for customer engagement” on page 13 Chapter 3, “Demonstration of ITCAM for WebSphere” on page 37 Chapter 4, “Implementation of ITCAM for WebSphere service” on page 47 Chapter 5, “Complementary solutions for ITCAM for WebSphere engagement” on page 105 Chapter 1. IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere solution offering 11
  • 12 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • 2 Chapter 2. Planning for customer engagement In this chapter, we discuss services engagement for ITCAM for WebSphere and in general. The topics that we discuss includes: 2.1, “Services engagement preparation” on page 14 2.2, “Solution scope and components” on page 15 2.3, “Services engagement overview” on page 16 2.4, “Defining solution timing” on page 21 2.5, “Statement of work” on page 29© Copyright IBM Corp. 2006. All rights reserved. 13
  • 2.1 Services engagement preparation This section describes resources that are available to help you successfully deliver a solution. The discussion is divided into: 2.1.1, “Implementation skills” on page 14 2.1.2, “Available resources” on page 142.1.1 Implementation skills To be able to successfully develop and deploy an ITCAM for WebSphere-based solution, you must acquire some specialized skills. The following skills are needed to implement and customize the solution: General skills – Operating system administration skills on Windows 2000 and Linux®-based systems – Connectivity and network administration skills on TCP/IP protocol – Understanding of Java and J2EE-based applications WebSphere Application Server skills – Using WebSphere Application Server administration console – Defining application resources in WebSphere Application Server ITCAM for WebSphere skills – Understanding of ITCAM for WebSphere components – The ability to perform problem determination related to ITCAM for WebSphere connectivity Depending on the target environment, you might need additional skill sets to understand the whole application environment, such as messaging platform, database management, back-end processing server, and so on. You might be able to acquire these skills from the resources listed in the next section.2.1.2 Available resources The prerequisite skills listed in the previous section are needed to customize or develop the solution. For each of these skills, there is a variety of resources available to help acquire the necessary skill level. Available educational resources are as follows: Online Help: IBM WebSphere Application Server and ITCAM for WebSphere provide online help and product manuals on the Web.14 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • Classroom Training: IBM PartnerWorld® provides current information about available classes, their dates, locations, and registration. Additionally, check the PartnerEducation Web site, which serves as a single point of contact for all Business Partner education and training. IBM Technical Education Services (ITES): ITES offers a variety of classes at all knowledge levels to help you achieve any of the offering’s prerequisite skills. IBM Redbooks: You can access various practical and architectural information regarding IBM hardware and software platforms from these books. They are available for download in the PDF format at http://ibm.com/redbooks.2.2 Solution scope and components You need to define the scope of the solution. The solution can be one of the two basic offering types in 2.2.1, “Basic solution definition” on page 15 or you can add additional components listed in 2.2.2, “Cross-sell and up-sell opportunities” on page 16.2.2.1 Basic solution definition The solution enables an enterprise to manage and analyze effective performance of a J2EE-based application to show a bottleneck and impending problems. The solution also enables an enterprise to analyze and improve the performance of its application. There are several forms of the solution that can be presented to the customer: Environment analysis solution: This enables you to perform analysis of an enterprise application using a portable ITCAM for WebSphere managing server. Typically you would leave the managing server running for a few days and generate reports. You analyze the report and provide your recommendations. Some adjustment of the monitoring level may have to be performed during that time to collect additional information. WebSphere application management solution: This solution implements the full function of ITCAM for WebSphere in the customer environment and enables customers to use and manage their own environment. Chapter 2. Planning for customer engagement 15
  • 2.2.2 Cross-sell and up-sell opportunities Additional solutions can be performed to include: Integration to IBM Tivoli Monitoring V6.1 Response time management with IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for Response Time Tracking End-to-end response time management with IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for CICS Transactions or IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for IMS Transactions Enhancement to integrate with IBM Tivoli Enterprise™ Console or IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager Collection of WebSphere performance information into IBM Tivoli Data Warehouse Note: Chapter 5, “Complementary solutions for ITCAM for WebSphere engagement” on page 105 offers details about additional services opportunities.2.3 Services engagement overview You routinely rely on your skills and previous experience as a guide, but there are always issues that require some educated guesswork. The goal of this section is to help you minimize the guesswork involved in planning and implementing a solution by providing a framework and time estimates for the major tasks. A typical services engagement consists of: Build an executive assessment (see 2.3.1, “Executive Assessment” on page 17) Set up a demonstration system or proof of technology (see 2.3.2, “Demonstration system setup” on page 18) Analyze solution tasks (2.3.3, “Analyze solution tasks” on page 19) Create a contract or statement of work (see 2.3.4, “Creating a contract” on page 20) The representative tasks and the time involved for custom solution execution are included in the following section. Each customer has a unique set of needs, so the actual set of tasks to accomplish and the time involved might vary. However, this list should help you understand implementation details, size the solution more accurately for the customer, and ensure a profitable engagement for yourself.16 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • It is important to work with your customers to understand their expectations. After you have gathered this data, document the tasks, deliverables, and associated costs in a statement of work. The statement of work acts as your contractual agreement with the customer for the duration of the project; therefore, a detailed and well-defined statement of work is advantageous both to you and your customer. A good overall understanding of the solution scope is a crucial prerequisite to successfully selling, developing, and implementing it. As a solution provider, you must understand what is involved in developing such a solution before you can discuss it with your customer and size it for a cost estimate.2.3.1 Executive Assessment The Executive Assessment is a billable service that you can offer to your prospective clients. It offers a process designed to help you evaluate the business needs of a company that is planning to deploy a solution for Web-based business. It was created for IBM Business Partners to help you close a higher ratio of opportunities. It has been field-tested in markets all over North America and Europe and has received enthusiastic feedback. The benefits of using the Executive Assessment in your sales process include: Earning additional service fees More effectively qualifying prospective clients Shortening the sales cycle Streamlining the development process Closing a much higher ratio of potential engagements This toolset helps you ask the right people the right questions so that you get the information you need to propose the appropriate solution. This assessment then helps you create a compelling business case that will persuade your prospect to buy the required hardware, software, and services from you in the shortest possible time. The complete Executive Assessment process should take approximately 10 to 16 hours. Table 2-1 shows the task breakdown. Table 2-1 Solution task Task Estimated time (hours) Initial fact-finding meeting, asking questions, and gathering 3 data Review and analysis of competing solutions 2 Chapter 2. Planning for customer engagement 17
  • Task Estimated time (hours) Preparation of a set of strategic recommendations 1 Creation of a demonstration prototype 3-9 Presentation of findings and close for a contract 1 Total 10-16 This is a business-case assessment, not a technical assessment, so your audience should be business owners, line-of-business executives, marketing and sales managers, and finally, the IT manager. The business owner or line-of-business executive is likely to be the decision maker. For their initial investment, your clients get: A business assessment prepared by a professional (you) A competitive analysis A prototype solution for their review A strategic and tactical proposal for justifying and implementing their solution for Web-based business Over the course of the Executive Assessment, you determine who will be involved in the project, what they want to accomplish, when they plan to deploy, where the Web plays a mission-critical role in their business, and how the project will be funded. Armed with this information, a competitive analysis, and a prototype solution, you will be able to justify their investment, build perceived value, present your recommendations in a way that is almost irresistible, and successfully close the contract. Having the ability to recommend the correct course of action to your client has tremendous value. In a market where it is difficult for companies to find qualified Business Intelligence consultants, the Executive Assessment and resulting presentation gives you a chance to prove conclusively that you have the right technology and the right people to do the job.2.3.2 Demonstration system setup A demonstration system is typically set up in advance to show your customers the attributes of the solution. The demonstration system can typically be set up with a limited number of systems that are separate from the system that will be used by the production system.18 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • You can set up ITCAM for WebSphere demonstration system using a two-machine environment: one running the managing server and the other running the application client with the data collector. This demonstration system is typically running a test application that you can load onto it so that you can use ITCAM for WebSphere to show monitoring processes and collect results. The demonstration system enables your customers to evaluate whether the solution suits their particular needs. Table 2-2 shows the tasks and estimated time for demonstrating the solution. Chapter 3, “Demonstration of ITCAM for WebSphere” on page 37 suggests some demonstration ideas. Table 2-2 Solution demonstration task Task Estimated time (hours) Set up hardware 1-2 Install and configure operating system 2-3 Install sample application 2-4 Install ITCAM for WebSphere 3-4 Install data collector 1 Run application load 1 Demonstrate to customer 2 Run reports 1 Total 13 - 182.3.3 Analyze solution tasks After the customer agrees to use the solution in their environment, you must decide how to implement it. These estimates would then be collected and implemented into a contract or statement of work. We discuss these tasks in detail in 2.4, “Defining solution timing” on page 21. These are our suggested tasks and order; you may complete the tasks in a different order or may omit or add tasks depending on the environment to which you implement the solution. Overall solution time might be influenced by the amount of skill and experience that you or your team have with the solution. The estimate that we present is typically based on the following factors: Has working knowledge of the operating system Has good understanding of WebSphere Application Server and J2EE-based environment Chapter 2. Planning for customer engagement 19
  • Understands J2EE application environment, with its components, such as Enterprise JavaBeans™ (EJB), Servlets, Java 2 Connector (J2C), Java Database Connectivity (JDBC), and Web Services. Understands WebSphere security concepts, such as Secure Socket Layer (SSL), LDAP authentication, and certificate usage Has thorough knowledge of ITCAM for WebSphere Depending on your skills and experience, the estimates we present might be too high or too low. Table 2-3 illustrates one method of approximating more realistic time estimates for your efforts, based on whether you or your team are new to each skill area or could be considered experts. A novice is someone who has completed training in the skill area but has no hands-on experience. An expert has completed training in the skill area and has implemented ITCAM for WebSphere projects. Table 2-3 Skill adjustment Skill Novice Expert increase by reduce by Experience with the operating system 25% 10% Deep understanding of WebSphere 40% 20% Application Server or J2EE environment Experience in ITCAM for WebSphere 10% 20% installation Familiarity of ITCAM for WebSphere reports 25% 20% For the detailed task breakdown, see 2.4, “Defining solution timing” on page 21.2.3.4 Creating a contract A contract or statement of work is a binding contractual agreement between you and your customer that defines the service engagement that you must perform and the result that the customer can expect from the engagement. The contract should leave nothing in doubt. A statement of work should include: Executive summary of the solution, which is typically a short (less than a page) summary of the solution and its benefit. You must specify any major restrictions of the implementation, such as: – The solution is only implemented for finance application servers. – The solution will be implemented in phases.20 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • Solution description, which contains the major components and solution building blocks that will be implemented. It should cover conceptual architecture of the solution and solution scope in general. This description is aimed for technical personnel to understand the implementation scope. Assumptions, which lists all of the assumptions that are used to prepare the contract and provide task estimation. Any deviation to the assumptions that is used will definitely affect the scope of engagement and must be managed using the change management procedure. Typical changes include cost changes or scope changes. Business partner responsibilities, which lists all of the responsibilities or major tasks that will be performed by you or your team to implement the solution. Customer responsibilities, which lists all of the responsibilities or items that the customer must provide for you or your team to perform the engagement. If you cannot obtain any item in the customer responsibilities, then a change management procedure may be invoked. Staffing estimates, which lists the estimated personnel needed to implement the solution. Project schedule and milestones, which shows the major steps, schedule, and achievement calendar that can be used to check the project progress. Testing methodology, which lists the test cases to ensure that the project implementation is successful. Deliverables, which provides tangible items that the customer will get at the end of the service engagement, including: – Machine installation – Documentation – Training Completion criteria, which lists the items that, when provided to the customer, indicate that the engagement is successfully completed. For most services engagements, this is probably the most delicate to define. Completion criteria can be so general that you will be tied up providing the customer ongoing support for life. On the other hand, an inadequate completion criteria is often rejected by the customer fearing that you might back away from the engagement in an incomplete state. See 2.5, “Statement of work” on page 29 for a sample statement of work.2.4 Defining solution timing A profitable services engagement has to correctly identify the tasks that you must perform and to adequately allocate the necessary time to perform them. This Chapter 2. Planning for customer engagement 21
  • section guides you on the tasks that you might need to perform for an ITCAM for WebSphere solution implementation and the timing estimate. The estimate relies largely on some basic assumptions: Managed environment size: the number of data collectors that must be implemented correspond directly with the load of the managing server and the time needed for: – Installing the data collectors – Designing monitoring server group and assigning operators – Analyzing performance information Application complexity: the number of servlets, EJB resources, and inter-server communication must be considered as they relate to the time needed for: – Analyzing performance information – Determining performance bottlenecks – Providing performance recommendations Transaction rate of the application server would affect processing overhead on the managing server and have an impact on the collected performance data size. A higher transaction rate requires a smaller sample percentage, but this might prevent some of important transaction data from being collected, so you should lengthen the analysis of performance information. Table 2-4 lists our sizing assumptions. Table 2-4 Sizing assumptions Assumption Simple Moderate Complex Number of data collectors <5 5 - 10 10 - 20 Number of J2EE resources < 50 50 - 100 100 - 200 Inter-server communication N/A one to one interconnected Transaction rate per data collector < 60/min 60 - 300/min 300 - 900/min Important: You must be aware of any specific application problems or offending transactions that the customer is experiencing. It is common for the customer to assume that you can resolve this problem. Any such specific analysis must be listed in the assumption and factored properly for the time estimation. Our estimate does not cover analyzing existing or specific problems.22 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • 2.4.1 Environment analysis tasks This section discusses the tasks for environment analysis engagement. Table 2-5 shows the timing estimate for the major components of the tasks for the environment analysis solution. Table 2-5 Environment analysis tasks Task Estimated time (hours) Simple Moderate Complex Plan the solution 5-8 6-9 9-12 Implement the solution 14-21 21-30 31-43 Close the engagement 2 2-3 3-5 Total 21-31 29-42 43-60 Plan the solution Planning the deployment of the ITCAM for WebSphere solution includes the subtasks shown in Table 2-6. Table 2-6 Estimated plan for the solution time Task Estimated time (hours) Simple Moderate Complex Gather detailed requirements 2-3 2-3 3-4 Design the solution 2-3 2-3 3-4 Perform gap analysis 1-2 2-3 3-4 Total 5-8 6-9 9-12 Gather requirements At the beginning of your engagement, you should meet with your customers to understand their proposed objectives and gather their requirements. First, you have to determine the functional requirements, which define the business functions that the Business Intelligence system is going to provide. You determine your requirements by developing a good understanding of the business needs and of what you hope to achieve. For example, look at issues such as business goals, purpose, and usage questions, such as who the users are and how they expect to interact. It is important to gather these requirements early and discover any challenges that might lay ahead while Chapter 2. Planning for customer engagement 23
  • they can still be dealt with easily. When you have determined the functional requirements, you can clarify the technical or system requirements. The technical requirement involves spending time at the customer site to determine and understand the available data sources. These data sources might come in different formats, such as relational databases, spreadsheets, text files, or even hard copies only. You need to be able to identify the fields or data elements in these data sources and plan how these data elements will be used in the target data mart. You also need to identify the schema or data usage changes from the supplied sample scenario, which is based on the non-customized products. The system requirement will be determined from the number and size of the data sources and the expected goals that the business questions will cover. This information dictates the size and performance of the systems that will be used in the solution. Design the solution Topics that should be addressed include scalability, functionality, and performance of this solution. Design involves understanding the customer’s environment including hardware, software, data volumes, special requirements, and operational procedures. It is necessary to identify and plan for any additional tuning of software that might be required because of the customer’s environment or special needs. In addition, an analysis of the modifications made to the scenarios and reports must be performed. After you have designed the proposed solution and reviewed it with your customer, you are ready to begin development of the offering. Perform gap analysis This task involves performing a gap analysis to give the customer an estimate of the development effort that is required to set up the solution. At its core, the analysis seeks to determine what customizable components should be extended, modified, or created. The number and complexity of customizable components drives the size of the project and the required resources. After you have designed the proposed solution and reviewed it with your customer, you are ready to proceed. Implement the solution Table 2-7 on page 25 lists the tasks that are performed in the implementation of the solution. Chapter 4, “Implementation of ITCAM for WebSphere service” on page 47 offers a detailed implementation guide for the environment analysis solution.24 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • Table 2-7 Implementation tasks Task Estimated time (hours) Simple Moderate Complex Install managing server on site 1-2 1-2 1-2 Install data collector 2-3 3-4 4-6 Run initial data collection 1-2 2-4 4-7 Run detailed data collection 2-3 3-4 4-5 Collect performance reports 2-3 4-6 8-10 Develop finding report 4-5 5-6 6-7 Removal of data collector 2-3 3-4 4-6 Total 14-21 21-30 31-43Detailed sub-tasks for the solution follow: Installing managing server on site Installing data collector Run initial data collection Run detailed data collection Collect performance reports Develop finding report Removal of data collectorClose the engagementBecause this service engagement does not provide ITCAM for WebSphere forthe customer to operate, you do not have to provide training, so our next step isto close the engagement. Table 2-8 lists the engagement close tasks.Table 2-8 Engagement close tasks Task Estimated time (hours) Simple Moderate Complex Presentation of performance findings 1 1-2 2-4 Closing of services engagement 1 1 1 Total 2 2-3 3-5 Presentation of performance findings and recommendations Closing of service engagement Chapter 2. Planning for customer engagement 25
  • 2.4.2 WebSphere application management tasks This section discusses the tasks for WebSphere application management engagement. Table 2-9 shows the timing estimate for the major components of the tasks for the WebSphere application management solution. Table 2-9 WebSphere application management tasks Task Simple Moderate Complex Plan the solution 5-8 6-9 9-12 Implement the solution 15-23 22-34 34-50 Provide training 8-14 8-20 12-24 Close the engagement 2 2-3 3-5 Total 30-47 38-66 58-91 Plan the solution Planning of the deployment of the ITCAM for WebSphere solution includes the subtasks shown in Table 2-10. Table 2-10 Estimated task time Task Estimated time (hours) Simple Moderate Complex Gather detailed requirements 2-3 2-3 3-4 Design the solution 2-3 2-3 3-4 Perform gap analysis 1-2 2-3 3-4 Total 5-8 6-9 9-12 Gather requirements At the beginning of your engagement, you should meet with your customers to understand their proposed objectives and gather their requirements. First, you have to determine the functional requirements. Functional requirements define the business functions that the Business Intelligence system will provide. You determine your requirements by developing a good understanding of the business needs and of what you hope to achieve. For example, look at issues such as business goals, purpose, and usage questions, such as who the users are and how they expect to interact. It is important to gather these requirements early to discover any challenges that might lie ahead while they can still be dealt with easily. When you have26 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • determined the functional requirements, you can clarify the technical or system requirements. The technical requirement involves spending time at the customer site to determine and understand the available data sources. These data sources may come in different formats, such as relational databases, spreadsheets, text files, or even hard copy only. You need to be able to identify the fields or data elements in these data sources and plan how these data elements will be used in the target data mart. You also need to identify the schema or data usage changes from the supplied sample scenario, which is based on the non-customized products. The system requirement will be determined from the number and size of the data sources and the expected goals that the business questions will cover. This information dictates the size and performance of the systems that will be used in the solution. Design the solution Topics that should be addressed include scalability, functionality, and performance of this solution. Design involves understanding the customer’s environment including hardware, software, data volumes, special requirements, and operational procedures. It is necessary to identify and plan for any additional tuning of software that might be required because of the customer’s environment or special needs. In addition, an analysis of the modifications to be made to the scenarios and reports has be performed. After you have designed the proposed solution and reviewed it with your customer, you can begin development of the offering. Perform gap analysis This task involves performing a gap analysis to give the customer an estimate of the development effort that is required to set up the solution. At its core, the analysis seeks to determine what customizable components need to be extended, modified, or created. The number and complexity of customizable components drive the size of the project and the required resources.After you have designed the proposed solution and reviewed it with yourcustomer, you are ready to proceed.Implement the solutionThe implementation of the solution is performed using the tasks described inTable 2-7 on page 25. Chapter 4, “Implementation of ITCAM for WebSphereservice” on page 47 offers detailed implementation tasks for the WebSphereapplication management solution. Chapter 2. Planning for customer engagement 27
  • Table 2-11 Implementation tasks Task Estimated time (hours) Simple Moderate Complex Install managing server 1-2 1-2 1-2 Install data collector 2-3 3-4 4-6 Customize management environment 1-2 2-4 4-7 Establish operation procedure 2-3 2-4 3-6 Run initial data collection 1-2 2-4 4-7 Run detailed data collection 2-3 4-6 8-10 Collect performance reports 2-3 3-4 4-5 Develop performance observation 4-5 5-6 6-7 Total 15-23 22-34 34-50 Detailed subtasks for the solution follow: Install managing server Install data collector Customize management environment Establish operation procedure Run initial data collection Run detailed data collection Collect performance reports Develop performance observation report Provide training Part of your implementation responsibilities can include training selected customer staff to troubleshoot basic problems and perform other operational tasks. This could involve some of the following topics: Solution technical design Problem Determination process Look at application logs Check software status Back up/restore important files and databases Develop a troubleshooting checklist Establish a Frequently Asked Questions list Administer the application Generate performance reports28 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • Technical training with your customer could take 16 hours or more, depending on the technical depth of the discussions. Provide training Table 2-12 lists the training tasks. Table 2-12 Training tasks Task Estimated time (hours) Simple Moderate Complex Administrator training 4-8 4-12 8-16 Operator training 4-6 4-8 4-8 Total 8-14 8-20 12-24 Close the engagement Table 2-13 lists the engagement closing tasks. Table 2-13 Close the engagement task Task Estimated time (hours) Simple Moderate Complex Presentation of performance findings 1 1-2 2-4 Closing of services engagement 1 1 1 Total 2 2-3 3-5 Removal of data collectors Presentation of performance findings and recommendations Closing of service engagement2.5 Statement of work This section provides some sample ideas for items that you can include in your statement of work contract. We divide this section for each solution.2.5.1 Environment analysis service The environment analysis service statement of work can consist of the sections listed here. Chapter 2. Planning for customer engagement 29
  • Executive summary The environment analysis service provides a high-level assessment of <customer> application environment. <You> provide an initial assessment of <customer> application on the area of <application name>, which consists of the following application servers: <lists>. The monitoring of these application servers will be conducted over the period of <date> for two weeks. At the end of the assessment period, <you> will present the assessment finding, including: Application server performance summary Application highlight, such as load profile, and transaction rate Performance highlights such as: potential bottleneck, excessive errors, deadlock Environment tuning recommendations Solution description In the environment analysis service, <you> will provide a managing server hardware that runs ITCAM for WebSphere managing server. ITCAM for WebSphere data collectors will be installed on <customer>’s production servers for assessment. The data collector will mainly run in level 1 monitoring, which will have limited impact on your servers; lab testing shows a typical increase of 2%-3% of CPU usage for the J2EE application server. The solution assumes that the managing server connection to the data collectors would not go through a firewall. During the assessment period, transaction performance information and application server performance information will be collected and stored in the ITCAM for WebSphere managing server database. <You> will analyze the collected performance information and possibly perform monitoring with additional detail as needed. The analysis is performed dynamically and will not need a restart of the application servers. At the end of the assessment period, <you> will remove the data collectors from <customer> application servers and present the performance finding.30 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • AssumptionsThese are possible assumptions that can be used in the environment analysisservice: Number of data collectors to be configured Transaction rate of each application server Transaction mix of each application server Note: Insert any additional assumptions about specific performance or transaction problem that the customer has.Business partner responsibilitiesIn addition to the solution implementation tasks described in Chapter 4,“Implementation of ITCAM for WebSphere service” on page 47, you also mightbe responsible for tasks such as project management, purchasing software andhardware, general consulting, and negotiating financing options with thecustomer.Customer responsibilitiesThis section describes the responsibilities the customer has to the BusinessPartner; for example: Designating a representative who will be the focal point for all communication with the Business Partner relative to this project and who will have the authority to act on the customer’s behalf in matters regarding this project Designating operations personnel to work with the Business Partner as appropriate Providing all required Web site content in digital form, as specified by the Business Partner Providing all product data in a format as requested Providing all data and information required for implementation Providing suitable workspace with telephone access for the services specialists while working on customer premises Providing user IDs, passwords, and IP addresses as required, enabling the Business Partner to perform the service Providing information to allow estimates on current and future system workload and performance expectations Chapter 2. Planning for customer engagement 31
  • Staffing estimates The project will be performed using one ITCAM for WebSphere specialist who will be on site as required by the project schedule. The project is estimated to be performed within three weeks. Project schedule and milestones Because this is a short project, we would not really need a milestone. Figure 2-1 on page 32 shows a sample project schedule. Jun 18 2006 Jun 25 2006 Jul 2 2006 ID Task Name Start Finish Duration 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 1 Plan the solution 6/19/2006 6/21/2006 3d 2 Implement the solution 6/22/2006 7/3/2006 8d 3 Close the engagement 7/4/2006 7/5/2006 2dFigure 2-1 Project schedule Testing methodology The testing of the solution is demonstrated using the reports generated by ITCAM for WebSphere in PDF format. <You> will generate the following reports during the assessment period: Top CPU user reports (daily) Top transaction usage (daily) Top response time report (daily) Transaction hourly profile on a day for top five transactions (weekly) Memory analysis report on the application server (once) Deliverables The deliverable of this project can be in the following form: ITCAM for WebSphere reports that are used for testing the solution Performance assessment and recommendation presentation by you Completion criteria The completion criteria should be listed here. You have to engage with the customer to get a proper signoff of the project with an appropriate completion criteria. Some ideas for the completion criteria are: Acceptance of the performance finding and recommendations. Data collectors and managing server have been removed from the customer environment.32 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • Specific performance problems or offending transaction resolutions may be included explicitly in the completion criteria. You have to be aware of these additional specific completion criteria for your customer.2.5.2 WebSphere application management service The WebSphere application management service statement of work can consists of the sections listed here. Executive summary The WebSphere application management service implements ITCAM for WebSphere in <customer> environment. ITCAM for WebSphere enables proactive monitoring of WebSphere Application Server and transaction performance. The implementation covers the application servers in <lists>. The initial monitoring of these application servers will be conducted over the period of <date range> for two weeks. At the end of the assessment period, <you> will present the assessment finding, including: Application server performance summary Application highlight, such as load profile, and transaction rate Performance highlights such as: potential bottleneck, excessive errors, deadlock Environment tuning recommendations <You> will also train <customer> for using ITCAM for WebSphere to manage your own environment. Solution description In the WebSphere application management service, <you> will install ITCAM for WebSphere managing server on your hardware platform. ITCAM for WebSphere data collectors will be installed on <customer>’s production servers for assessment. The data collector will mainly run in level 1 monitoring, which will have limited impact on your servers; lab testing shows a typical increase of 2%-3% of CPU usage for the J2EE application server. The solution assumes that the managing server would not have to connect to the data collector through a firewall. During the assessment period, transaction performance information and application server performance information will be collected and stored in the ITCAM for WebSphere managing server database. Chapter 2. Planning for customer engagement 33
  • <You> will analyze the collected performance information and possibly perform monitoring with additional detail as needed. The analysis is performed dynamically and will not require a restart of the application servers. <You> will provide training for <customer> personnel to use and maintain the ITCAM for WebSphere solution that has been implemented. Assumptions Possible assumptions that can be used in the environment analysis service include: Number of data collectors to be configured Transaction rate of each application server Transaction mix of each application server Note: Insert any additional assumption about specific performance or transaction problem that the customer has. Business Partner responsibilities Business Partner responsibilities are described in Chapter 4, “Implementation of ITCAM for WebSphere service” on page 47. In addition to the solution development tasks described in this chapter, you also might be responsible for tasks such as project management, purchasing software and hardware, general consulting, and negotiating financing options with the customer. Customer responsibilities This section describes the responsibilities the customer has to the Business Partner, such as: Designating a representative who will be the focal point for all communication with the Business Partner relative to this project and who will have the authority to act on the customer’s behalf in matters regarding this project Designating operations personnel to work with the Business Partner as appropriate Providing all required Web site content in digital form, as specified by the Business Partner Providing all product data in a format as requested Providing all data and information required for implementation Providing suitable workspace with telephone access for the services specialists while working on customer premises Providing user IDs, passwords, and IP addresses as required, enabling the Business Partner to perform the service34 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • Providing information to allow estimates on current and future system workload and performance expectations Staffing estimates The project will be performed using one ITCAM for WebSphere specialist who will be on site as required by the project schedule. The project is estimated to be performed within three weeks. Project schedule and milestones Because this is a short project, we would not really need a milestone. Figure 2-2 shows a sample project schedule. Jun 18 2006 Jun 25 2006 Jul 2 2006 ID Task Name Start Finish Duration 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 1 Plan the solution 6/19/2006 6/21/2006 3d 2 Implement the solution 6/22/2006 7/3/2006 8d 3 Close the engagement 7/4/2006 7/5/2006 2dFigure 2-2 Project schedule Testing methodology The testing of the solution is demonstrated using the reports generated by ITCAM for WebSphere in PDF format. <You> will generate the following reports during the assessment period: Top CPU user reports (daily) Top transaction usage (daily) Top response time report (daily) Transaction hourly profile on a day for top five transactions (weekly) Memory analysis report on the application server (once) Deliverables The deliverable of this project can be in the following form: ITCAM for WebSphere managing server installed and running ITCAM for WebSphere reports that are used for testing the solution Performance assessment and recommendation presentation by you Operational procedure for ITCAM for WebSphere operation Training material and presentation Chapter 2. Planning for customer engagement 35
  • Completion criteria The completion criteria should be listed here. You have to engage with the customer to get a proper signoff of the project with an appropriate completion criteria. Some ideas for the completion criteria are: Acceptance of the performance finding and recommendation Data collectors and managing server have been removed from the customer environment Specific performance problems or offending transaction resolutions may be included explicitly in the completion criteria. You have to be aware of these additional specific completion criteria for your customer.36 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • 3 Chapter 3. Demonstration of ITCAM for WebSphere This chapter describes the tasks for demonstrating ITCAM for WebSphere. It includes the following sections: 3.1, “Demonstration system setup” on page 38 3.2, “WebSphere Application Server monitoring” on page 44 3.3, “Generating performance report” on page 45© Copyright IBM Corp. 2006. All rights reserved. 37
  • 3.1 Demonstration system setup The demonstration system can be set up with at least two machines. Table 3-1 shows the minimum machine specifications. Table 3-1 Demonstration machine specification Managing server Data collector CPU Pentium CPU 2 GHz as required by WebSphere Memory at least 2 GB 1 GB Disk space 15 GB 5 GB Figure 3-1 shows the conceptual configuration of the demonstration system. Managing server Managed server Loader Visualization engine HTTP Kernel TraderClient DC Publish server Web Svcs Archive agent TraderDBSvc DC DB2 TRADER OCTIGATE Figure 3-1 Demonstration system setup This section explains the procedure of setting up the demonstrating ITCAM for WebSphere solution using the Trader DB2 application.3.1.1 Installing application environment The application runs in two WebSphere Application Server instances on a single or separate machines. The data of the application is loaded into a DB2 database.38 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • The following procedure uses a Windows-based server. The applicationenvironment installation is as follows:1. Install DB2 Universal Database™; we use the DB2 installation image that come with ITCAM for WebSphere. a. Start DB2 installation using the setup.exe command. b. From the LaunchPad panel, click Install. c. Follow the DB2 installation wizard and use the default options.2. Install WebSphere Application Server V6.0.1, using the same image for ITCAM for WebSphere. a. Start WebSphere Application Server installation using the setup.exe command. b. Use the default installation options to install WebSphere. c. After WebSphere Application Server is installed, run the profile creator again from C:Program FilesIBMWebSphereAppServerbinProfileCreator and invoke pctWindows command. d. Create a new profile called srvr and use default options.3. Create the sample Trader database. a. The Trader database is supplied in the additional material of this book. For information, see Appendix A, “Additional material” on page 111. b. Unzip the TraderDB.zip file into a temporary directory. c. From the DB2 Command Window, create the new Trader database by issuing this command: db2 create db TRADER. d. Import the table data and definition using the command: db2move TRADER import. You must run this command from the temporary directory where you extracted TraderDB.zip.4. Define JDBC connection to the Trader database. a. Connect to the AppSrv administration console instance using http://<machine>:9061/ibm/console b. Select Resources → JDBC Provider. c. Create a new JDBC provider with the following data: Database DB2 Driver DB2 Universal JDBC driver Connection Connection Pool Data source d. Click Apply in the JDBC Provider window, then click the Data Source link. Chapter 3. Demonstration of ITCAM for WebSphere 39
  • e. Create a new Data Source by setting: Name Trader JNDI name jdbc/Trader f. Click Apply, and then click J2C Authentication Entry. g. Create a new Authentication entry by setting: Name db2admin UserID db2admin Password The password you specify when you install DB2 h. Save your definition, click Save and then click OK. 5. Install the Trader application file. a. Connect to the AppSrv administration console instance using http://<machine>:9061/ibm/console b. Go to Application → Install New Application. c. Select the TraderDBSvc.ear file from your machine and click OK. d. Confirm all of the default deployment options and save the configuration when it is done. e. Connect to the AppCln administration console instance using http://<machine>:9062/ibm/console f. Go to Application → Install New Application. g. Select the TraderClient.ear file from your machine and click OK. h. Confirm all the default deployment options and save the configuration when it is done. 6. Restart WebSphere Application Servers. a. Go to Programs → IBM WebSphere Application Server → Profiles → AppSrv → Stop the server. b. Go to Programs → IBM WebSphere Application Server → Profiles → AppSrv → Start the server. c. Go to Programs → IBM WebSphere Application Server → Profiles → AppCln → Stop the server. d. Go to Programs → IBM WebSphere Application Server → Profiles → AppCln → Start the server. 7. Test the sample application. a. Open a Web browser and go to http://<machine>:9081/TraderClientWeb b. Enter a name, select DB2, and enter the server name of <machine>:9080 as shown in Figure 3-2 on page 41. Click GO.40 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • Figure 3-2 Trader client Web page c. Select Quote for one of the companies. d. Put 5 in the buy and verify that your owned share increases.3.1.2 Installing ITCAM for WebSphere environment The ITCAM for WebSphere environment installation is similar for demonstration systems and production systems. Refer to 4.1, “Install the managing server” on page 48 for the managing server installation and to 4.3, “Install data collectors” on page 62 for the data collector installation. You must install the data collector on both instances of the WebSphere Application Servers. After you have installed ITCAM for WebSphere managing server and data collectors, you can set up the management resources. Chapter 3. Demonstration of ITCAM for WebSphere 41
  • 3.1.3 Setting up management resources You now must perform the following for your demonstration: 1. Configure your data collectors. The data collectors, when they are connected to the managing server, do not perform any work until they are configured. To configure the data collector: a. From the Web console, log on and select ADMINISTRATION → Server Management → Data Collector Configuration. b. Click the Unconfigured Data Collector link and check the two application servers that are connected. c. Select the J2EE default profile and click Configure. 2. Modify the monitoring level definition. For a demonstration system, you might want to collect everything with a monitoring level 3. You would not want this for a live system because this might generate additional, unwanted overhead. a. Go to ADMINISTRATION → System Properties b. Set the default monitoring to Level 3. c. Set the sampling rate for level 3 to 100%. d. Save the definition. 3. Define server groups and assign your data collectors. Server groups are used to aggregate the application servers into groups. Perform these steps: a. Select ADMINISTRATION → Server Management → Server groups. b. Create a server group called Traders and assign both application servers to it. Click OK to save the definition. c. Create a server group called Servers and assign AppSrv profile application servers to it. Click OK to save the definition. d. Create a server group called Clients and assign AppCln profile application servers to it. Click OK to save the definition. 4. Create operators for demonstration. Different operators can have different roles in an enterprise. Having several different operators enables you to demonstrate the operator-specific assignment. a. Select ADMINISTRATION → User Profiles. b. Select the itcamadm user and assign all server groups and click Save. c. Click the Create User Account link. d. Create the user oper1 and assign the Clients group. Click Save. e. Create the user oper2 and assign the Servers group. Click Save.42 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • 3.1.4 Running the application load generator After your data collectors are correctly defined and configured in the managing server, you can generate a scripted load for your application environment. This is performed by a sample HTTP client application that is available from our additional material. (See Appendix A, “Additional material” on page 111.) The load generator is launched using the loader.jar archive that is supplied. 1. Run the loader.jar using the predefined Java environment from WebSphere. If you install WebSphere using its default path in Windows environment, you can launch the application using the command: C:PROGRA~1IBMWebSphereAppServerjavabinjava -cp loader.jar;loaderaux.jar com.ibm.vbd.loader.LauncherMain You might need to use the full path of loader.jar. 2. Select the TraderClientWeb profile and click Launch. 3. Identify the appropriate settings as shown in Figure 3-3, then click Run: Target host Host name and port for the TraderClient application Number of thread Number of concurrent user requests Average think time Delay between consecutive invocations of Trader transaction Parameter Host name and port for the TraderDB application Figure 3-3 Loader application setting 4. Let it run for a while to generate data. the ITCAM for WebSphere data collector availability graph will start showing statistics soon. Chapter 3. Demonstration of ITCAM for WebSphere 43
  • 3.2 WebSphere Application Server monitoring From the ITCAM for WebSphere Web console, we perform the monitoring of the environment. The following scenario illustrates ITCAM for WebSphere features: 1. Open the ITCAM for WebSphere Web console using http://<machine>:9080/am/home (where <machine> represents your managing server machine name) 2. Log on as oper1. The oper1 operator is only assigned the Clients server group. a. You initially arrive in the Enterprise summary page with the Clients server group performance displayed. Click on the server group list to see the list of application servers (which will be only one). b. Click on the application server to see the performance summary of the application server. c. Log off oper1 session. 3. Log on as oper2. a. You initially arrive in the Enterprise summary page with the Servers server group performance displayed. Click on the server group list to see the list of application servers (which will be only one). b. Click on the application server to see the performance summary of the application server. c. Log off oper2 session. 4. Log on as itcamadm. a. You initially arrive in the Enterprise summary page with all three server groups displayed. You have All, Servers and Clients server groups performance displayed. b. Click on the All server group to see the list of application servers. You should see both your application servers. 5. Use Recent Activity Display for ad hoc transaction monitoring. a. The Recent Activity Display is retrieved from the AVAILABILITY → Recent Activity Display. b. Look at all the transactions that have been generated by the loader program.44 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • 6. Look for the inflight thread, which might or might not indicate a problem. Most of the threads are just in-transit threads that are executing at the time of the snapshot. Those threads would be gone on the next refresh. Some of the threads might linger on and indicate response time or performance problems. a. Go to PROBLEM DETERMINATION → In-flight Request Display. b. If you notice a long-running transaction, drill down in it and find out what is it doing. We have concluded the monitoring section of the demonstration. This should illustrate what an operator would do on day-to-day basis to monitor WebSphere Application Server.3.3 Generating performance report Performance reports are another way to manage WebSphere performance, usually used to analyze over a longer period of time. The performance summary in 3.2, “WebSphere Application Server monitoring” on page 44 typically captures data for the past hour. The in-flight requests and recent activity display is limited to the most recent 200 transactions. The performance reports enables you to analyze performance over days of activities and compare performance in different time frames. It is also helpful to produce a capacity analysis reports. 1. To get the transaction report: a. Go to PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS → Create transaction report → Request transaction report. b. Navigate around the reporting pages, table view, decomposition view and detail views. 2. To get the server resource report: a. Go to PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS → Create server report → System resource report. b. Analyze the CPU usage and memory utilization for the servers. 3. To get the top report: a. Go to PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS → Create transaction report → TOP report. b. Find the slowest transaction and slowest method within the system. Chapter 3. Demonstration of ITCAM for WebSphere 45
  • 46 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • 4 Chapter 4. Implementation of ITCAM for WebSphere service This chapter describes the tasks for implementing the WebSphere application management services. It contains the following sections: 4.1, “Install the managing server” on page 48 4.2, “Modify the managing server for the other site” on page 61 4.3, “Install data collectors” on page 62 4.4, “Customize the management environment” on page 71 4.5, “Run initial data collection” on page 84 4.7, “Run detailed data collection” on page 84 4.6, “Collect performance reports” on page 84 4.8, “Develop the finding report” on page 102 4.9, “Remove the data collector” on page 102© Copyright IBM Corp. 2006. All rights reserved. 47
  • 4.1 Install the managing server The managing server installation is performed using the embedded installation method. The procedure assumes that you use Linux server on an Intel platform. The installation of the managing server is as follows. Note: Windows-based managing server has the following prerequisites: 1. Microsoft® Services for UNIX® installation 2. ITCAM for WebSphere instance user ID creation, such as itcamadm 3. Assigning itcamadm to the Administrators group 4. Permitting user rights for Act as part of operating system and Logon as service for itcamadm 1. Create the instance owner user ID with the adduser command, which automatically creates a user and a group with the same name. 2. Ensure that you have access to the following software installation images: – ITCAM for WebSphere managing server CD – DB2 Universal Database V8.2 FixPack 3 – WebSphere Application Server V6.0.0 – WebSphere Application Server refreshpack 1 V6.0.1 3. Copy the software installation images from CD-ROM media to a temporary location in your accessible drive. – You can mount a CD-ROM using the command: mount /dev/cd0 /mnt/cdrom – You can copy the files to the /tmp directory; first create a target path in the /tmp using mkdir /tmp/<dirname> and then copy using the command cp -R /mnt/cdrom /tmp/<dirname> 4. Start the managing server wizard using the setup_MS.bin executable in the ITCAM for WebSphere managing server installation image. The installation performs an embedded installation of DB2 and WebSphere. – DB2 is installed under $AM_HOME/SQLLIB – WebSphere is installed under $AM_HOME/WAS6048 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • 5. Figure 4-1 shows the IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere installation wizard welcome dialog. Click Next.Figure 4-1 Welcome dialog Chapter 4. Implementation of ITCAM for WebSphere service 49
  • 6. Accept the software license agreement as shown in Figure 4-2. Click Next. Figure 4-2 Software license agreement50 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • 7. The dialog in Figure 4-3 asks you whether the installation is performed from a CD-ROM. For CD-ROM installation, the wizard copies the installation image to a temporary directory and restarts itself. We are installing the product from a local drive. Select No. Click Next.Figure 4-3 Media selection dialog8. Enter the location where you want to install IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere, as shown in Figure 4-4. The default path for Windows system is C:Program FilesIBMitcamWebSphereMS. Click Next.Figure 4-4 Directory path Chapter 4. Implementation of ITCAM for WebSphere service 51
  • Note: In this guide, we refer to this managing server installation location as $AM_HOME. 9. For an embedded complete installation, select all of the features in the IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere managing server, as shown in Figure 4-5. Optionally, you can install the visualization engine and database tables separately. Click Next. Figure 4-5 Component list 10.Select Install DB2, as shown in Figure 4-6. Click Next. You can also use an existing DB2 or Oracle database, if you already have them installed and the managing server has access to this database. Figure 4-6 Database installation option52 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • 11.Because we install DB2 from scratch, the wizard asks for some DB2-related information. It asks for the DB2 instance user and administration user; typically these users are called dasusr1 and db2inst1. Enter the information in the User Name, Password, and Verify Password fields, as shown in Figure 4-7. Click Next.Figure 4-7 Selecting the DB2 user12.For DB2 installation, you must provide the source of the DB2 installation image. Figure 4-8 shows the dialog for the DB2 installation image. Note that the path must include the setup.exe of DB2. Click Next.Figure 4-8 DB2 installation location Chapter 4. Implementation of ITCAM for WebSphere service 53
  • 13.The DB2 installation starts as shown in Figure 4-9. This will take some time. Figure 4-9 DB2 installation progress 14.After the DB2 installation is complete, the wizard collects information for creating the OCTIGATE database. Figure 4-10 shows the dialog. Most of the information here is pre-filled because DB2 is installed using the embedded installation. You must supply an existing user ID for the Admin User prompt; this will be the user to log on initially to the Web console. Type itcamadm for this. Click Next. Figure 4-10 Creating database parameter54 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • 15.After the OCTIGATE database is created, the installer searches for the WebSphere Application Server installation. In this case, Figure 4-11 shows that we do not have WebSphere installed. Click Next.Figure 4-11 WebSphere not found dialog Chapter 4. Implementation of ITCAM for WebSphere service 55
  • 16.Because we do not have any previous installation of WebSphere Application Server, the dialog in Figure 4-12 shows the WebSphere Application Server new installation parameters. Enter the password in the Password and Verify Password fields. Click Next. Figure 4-12 New installation of WebSphere Application Server56 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • 17.You must provide the installation source for both WebSphere Application Server V6.0 and refresh pack 1, as shown in Figure 4-13. Click Next.Figure 4-13 WebSphere Application Server installation sources18.After you install all of the prerequisites (DB2 Universal Database and WebSphere Application Server), you can start the actual IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere managing server. You must specify two kernel machines for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere as shown in Figure 4-14. Click Next.Figure 4-14 Kernel information Chapter 4. Implementation of ITCAM for WebSphere service 57
  • 19.Each component of the managing server uses a Transmission Control Protocol Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) port to communicate with other components. The dialog in Figure 4-15 lists the port usages for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere managing server. You can change any of these port definitions. Click Next. Figure 4-15 Port information58 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • 20.Before the installation begins, the summary information is displayed as shown in Figure 4-16. Click Next and the installer starts transferring the product files.Figure 4-16 Installation summary21.Figure 4-17 shows that the installation is complete. Click Finish.Figure 4-17 Installation complete22.If your managing server is for demonstration purposes with memory less than 3 GB, take the following steps: a. Modify setenv.sh from the bin subdirectory of the installation path, typically /opt/IBM/itcam/WebSphere/MS/bin/setenv.sh. This file contains environment variables that ITCAM for WebSphere managing server uses for starting up its processes. You can decrease the initial heap size for publish server, archive agent, and kernel by half as shown in Example 4-1 on page 60. Chapter 4. Implementation of ITCAM for WebSphere service 59
  • Example 4-1 Modifying heap size in setenv.sh HEAP_MIN_SIZE_PS=128 HEAP_MAX_SIZE_PS=256 HEAP_MIN_SIZE_ARCHIVE_AGENT=128 HEAP_MAX_SIZE_ARCHIVE_AGENT=256 HEAP_MIN_SIZE_EMAIL=32 HEAP_MAX_SIZE_EMAIL=64 HEAP_MIN_SIZE_MESSAGE_DISPATCHER=32 HEAP_MAX_SIZE_MESSAGE_DISPATCHER=64 HEAP_MIN_SIZE_KERNEL=64 HEAP_MAX_SIZE_KERNEL=256 HEAP_MIN_SIZE_AVM=32 HEAP_MAX_SIZE_AVM=64 HEAP_MIN_SIZE_SAM=64 HEAP_MAX_SIZE_SAM=128 HEAP_MIN_SIZE_POLLING_AGENT=64 HEAP_MAX_SIZE_POLLING_AGENT=64 b. Modify the am-start.sh and am-stop.sh in the bin subdirectory and only start the kernels, publish server 1, and archive agent 1; comment out the rest of the startup or shutdown. See Example 4-2. Note: The following processes are disabled: Polling server polls Web server for monitoring. Message dispatcher sends trap and e-mail. Global publish server correlates transaction across machines. Example 4-2 Modified startup in am-start.sh ${CYANEA_HOME}/bin/amctl.sh aa1 start #${CYANEA_HOME}/bin/amctl.sh aa2 start ${CYANEA_HOME}/bin/amctl.sh ps1 start #${CYANEA_HOME}/bin/amctl.sh ps2 start #${CYANEA_HOME}/bin/amctl.sh md start #${CYANEA_HOME}/bin/amctl.sh pa start #${CYANEA_HOME}/bin/amctl.sh sam1 start 23.Now you can start the managing server. Restart WebSphere Application Server for the Web interface: a. Stop WebSphere Application Server from /opt/IBM/itcam/WebSphere/MS/WAS60/profiles/default/bin and run the ./stopServer.sh server1 command. b. Start WebSphere Application Server from /opt/IBM/itcam/WebSphere/MS/WAS60/profiles/default/bin and run the ./startServer.sh server1 command.60 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • 24.Start the managing server using the command /opt/IBM/itcam/WebSphere/MS/bin/am-start.sh. 25.Log on to the Web console using the user ID that you specified in step 1. Go to ADMINISTRATION → Managing Server → Self Diagnostics. Verify that all of your managing server components are started.4.2 Modify the managing server for the other site This task assumes that you already have installed a managing server that you will bring to the customer environment. If you must install the managing server from scratch, read 4.1, “Install the managing server” on page 48. Follow these implementation steps: 1. Clean up the managing server database. a. Stop the managing server component using this command: /opt/IBM/itcam/WebSphere/MS/bin/am-stop.sh b. Stop WebSphere Application Server using this command: /opt/IBM/itcam/WebSphere/MS/WAS60/profiles/default/bin/stopServer .sh server1 c. Optionally, back up your current managing server database using these commands: . /opt/IBM/itcam/WebSphere/MS/SQLLIB/db2profile db2move OCTIGATE export d. From /opt/IBM/itcam/WebSphere/MS/bin, run the command ./db e. Stop DB2 processes using the command db2 stop dbm. 2. Assign a new IP address and host name for the managing server database, using the appropriate tools provided with your Linux distribution. Make sure that your managing server is aware of the new IP address and host name. Verify these using the following commands: hostname ifconfig -a ping <ipaddr> ping <hostname> nslookup <ipaddr> nslookup <hostname> 3. Verify connectivity of the managing server. a. Start DB2 using this command: db2 start dbm. b. Start the managing server component using this command: /opt/IBM/itcam/WebSphere/MS/bin/am-start.sh Chapter 4. Implementation of ITCAM for WebSphere service 61
  • c. Start WebSphere Application Server using this command: /opt/IBM/itcam/WebSphere/MS/WAS60/profiles/default/bin/startServe r.sh server1 4. Ensure access to the managing server Web console. a. Connect to the Web console using the new host name in the URL: http://<hostname>:9080/am/home b. Log on to the Web console using the itcamadm user ID that you set up. c. Go to ADMINISTRATION → Managing Server → Self Diagnostic and verify that all your managing server components are available. 5. Create server groups. a. You may define a single server group to encompass all of the application servers. b. Create the group using ADMINISTRATION → Server Management → Server groups. c. Create a new group and authorize itcamadm to use it. 6. Define monitoring defaults. a. Go to ADMINISTRATION → Managing Server → System Properties. b. Set the default sampling rate; because you need to analyze the system fast and you would not want to keep the system running for a long period, you can set the default sampling rate pretty high. You would want a sample for most of the transaction. You can collect up to about 10 transactions per minute.4.3 Install data collectors The data collector installation assumes that you use a single managing server. We demonstrate the installation task for a Windows-based data collector. You must install all data collectors before continuing to the next task. The installation tasks are: 1. Verify that the WebSphere Application Server is running.62 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • 2. Start the Installation by using the setup_DC_w32.exe command either from the data collector installation media or a copy of the image in a local directory. The installation wizard opens with a welcome dialog, as shown in Figure 4-18. Click Next.Figure 4-18 Welcome dialog3. Select only the Application Monitor interface option, as shown in Figure 4-19. Do not select the IBM Tivoli Enterprise Portal interface option unless the IBM Tivoli Enterprise Monitoring V6.1 environment is already installed and available. Click Next.Figure 4-19 Selecting the installation components Chapter 4. Implementation of ITCAM for WebSphere service 63
  • 4. Accept the license agreement, as shown in Figure 4-20. Click Next. Figure 4-20 License agreement 5. The default pre-filled installation path provided for Windows environments is displayed as C:Program FilesIBMitcamWebSphereDC. This default path will work. Because we do not want to have a space in the default installation path, it is eliminated. This is becoming a best practice for installing software on Windows. The install process will create the directory if it does not already exist. Enter C:IBMitcamWebSphereDC, as shown in Figure 4-21. Click Next. Note: In this guide, we refer to this data collector installation location C:IBMitcamWebSphereDC as $DC_HOME. Figure 4-21 Selecting the installation path64 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • 6. Select WebSphere Application Server as the type of application server, as shown in Figure 4-22. WebSphere Portal Server is also an option but this is not covered in this guide. Figure 4-22 Selecting WebSphere type 7. The wizard detects any existing WebSphere Application Server installations and their associated profiles on this machine. Choose the application server profile to be instrumented with a data collector, as shown in Figure 4-23. Click Next.Figure 4-23 Existing WebSphere installation Chapter 4. Implementation of ITCAM for WebSphere service 65
  • 8. Verify the gathered information in the new dialog window. The installed WebSphere Application Server is used to identify the Java environment that the ITCAM for WebSphere data collector will use. This information is prepopulated, as shown in Figure 4-24. Click Next. Figure 4-24 WebSphere properties 9. Enter the remote ITCAM for WebSphere managing server connection properties for both the primary and secondary kernels, as shown in Figure 4-25. Click Next. Figure 4-25 Managing server properties66 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • 10.In the next dialog window, specify the installation path of the managing server, as shown in Figure 4-26. Some instrumentation jar files will be downloaded from the managing server installation using this path. Click Next.Figure 4-26 Managing server installation path11.The next window displays some core installation summary information, as shown in Figure 4-27. Click Next to install the data collector.Figure 4-27 Installation summary12.When the installation is complete, the resulting window (Figure 4-28) provides an option to either proceed and configure the data collector or to defer the configuration until later. Select Launch the Configuration Tool. Click Next.Figure 4-28 Launching the configuration tool Chapter 4. Implementation of ITCAM for WebSphere service 67
  • The wizard launches the data collector configuration wizard. 13.The configuration tool welcome dialog opens as shown in Figure 4-29. Click Next. Figure 4-29 Configuration tool welcome dialog 14.The next dialog (Figure 4-30) shows both the configure and unconfigure options. Because this is an initial installation, select the Configure servers for data collection option. Click Next. Figure 4-30 Configuration option dialog68 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • 15.The configuration tool has to access the unique SOAP Connector port belonging to a specific WebSphere Application Server instance to configure it for data collection and monitoring. Figure 4-31 shows the dialog where you have to enter this connection information. Click Next. Note: For a WebSphere Application Server network deploy installation with multiple nodes, use the SOAP port for the deployment manager node. This configuration topic is beyond the scope of this guide.Figure 4-31 SOAP connection setup Chapter 4. Implementation of ITCAM for WebSphere service 69
  • 16.The wizard retrieves the necessary information from the targeted WebSphere Application Server instance through the specified SOAP Connector port. This information is presented in a tree view, as shown in Figure 4-32. Select the application server instance and click Next. Figure 4-32 Selecting the application server instance 17.When the configuration is complete, a configuration summary dialog opens (Figure 4-33). Click Finish to exit the data collector configuration wizard. Figure 4-33 Configuration completed70 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • 18.When the configuration process is complete, a dialog box from the data collector installation process opens, as shown in Figure 4-34. Click Finish to exit. Figure 4-34 Installation completed Note: You can manually launch the data collector configuration wizard for other application server instances using the appropriate script in the $DC_HOME/config_dc directory.4.4 Customize the management environment You must customize the management environment. The customization sequence is as follows: 1. 4.4.1, “IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere” on page 71 2. 4.4.2, “Activating data collection” on page 72 3. 4.4.3, “Defining server groups” on page 78 4. 4.4.4, “Defining operators” on page 814.4.1 IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere Perform these initial setup tasks working from the system on which you have installed the managing server components that comprise the ITCAM for WebSphere solution. 1. Start the managing server if it is not already started for this Windows installation. Using the Windows graphical user interface (GUI), select Start → All Programs → ITCAMfWS → am-start.sh. Alternatively, from the command line, you can start the Microsoft Services for UNIX environment and issue the am-start.sh command. The command that you issue using the Chapter 4. Implementation of ITCAM for WebSphere service 71
  • Windows GUI does the same function. You can see this by right-clicking the am-start.sh item in the Windows GUI menu path shown in the next section. 2. Double-click the desktop icon ITCAMfWAS to start the browser-based managing server console. Alternatively, enter the following URL in your browser to start this console: http://MShost:9080/am/home 3. The welcome and login window for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere opens. Enter the user and password established when you installed the managing server.4.4.2 Activating data collection You have to complete several administrative tasks before the data collectors can begin sending application server monitoring information to the managing server for display. These are: Assigning a configuration profile for the data collector. See “Data collector configuration” on page 72. Defining the monitoring level and sampling rate for the data collector. See “Monitoring level and sampling rate” on page 75. Data collector configuration A configuration is a profile that assigns a specific monitoring definition for a data collector. 1. From the menu bar at the top of the browser console, select ADMINISTRATION → Server Management → Data Collector Configuration. 2. Click the Unconfigured Data Collectors link to view the newly installed data collector. 3. Figure 4-35 on page 73 shows the unconfigured data collector window. Configuring the data collector means that we assign the data collector to one of the three default profiles in the managing server. Select the J2EE Default profile using the pull-down menu. Select the appropriate application server where the data collector is installed. Click Apply.72 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • Figure 4-35 Unconfigured data collector 4. The Configured Data Collectors page opens with the new data collector added to the list of already configured data collectors. See Figure 4-36. Click the Configuration Library link in the menu box to the left. Figure 4-36 Data collector configuration Chapter 4. Implementation of ITCAM for WebSphere service 73
  • This shows the default profiles for Customer Information Control System (CICS), Information Management System (IMS), and J2EE, as shown in Figure 4-37. These default profiles list the transaction names or class names to be excluded when processing information in the data collector. These configurations should be adequate for most installations. If necessary, you can perform further customization by updating the configuration files. Note: The association between a data collector instance and a profile is eternal; that is, if we change the profile, all of its historic monitoring data will be lost.Figure 4-37 Default monitoring profile You have configured the data collector with the default J2EE profile.74 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • Monitoring level and sampling rateNow that you have configured the data collector, you can view or change themonitoring level and sampling rates that the ITCAM for WebSphere managingserver uses.The following list describes the different monitoring levels that are available: Level 1 (L1): Production Mode This monitoring level provides availability management, system resources and basic request-level data. It least affects the central processing unit (CPU) overhead per transaction and is appropriate for servers that are not malfunctioning. Level 2 (L2): Problem Determination Mode This monitoring level provides production-level monitoring plus advanced request data, including external component and CPU information, as well as additional monitoring fields and functions. In this mode, you can view component traces. These are traces that show J2EE request-related events that are made to external services. You must use this level when you suspect a problem, or when you have to capture data about external events but do not need all the method-level data. Level 3 (L3): Tracing Mode This is the most powerful monitoring level because only this level utilizes all available reporting elements. For example, in L3 the server activity display shows additional data for the following columns: Accumulated CPU, Last Known Class Name, Last Known Method, and Last Known Action. In addition, on the Request Detail page, the Method Trace with Structured Query Language (SQL) statements are also available. L3 has inherently higher overhead than the other monitoring levels. Therefore, you must use this level for servers that have been selected for diagnostics and detailed workload characterization. It is advisable to schedule L3 for a very short period of time when investigating issues on a production application server. Note: You must set the monitoring level to either Problem Determination Mode (L2) or Tracing Mode (L3) to retrieve information about lock contentions and lock acquisitions. Chapter 4. Implementation of ITCAM for WebSphere service 75
  • To view or change monitoring levels, perform the following steps: 1. To view the default monitoring level, polling frequency, and the sampling rates specified for each monitoring level option, select ADMINISTRATION → Managing Server → System Properties from the menu bar at the top of the console. Figure 4-38 shows an example.Figure 4-38 Default monitoring level Depending on a composite application’s complexity and transaction level, it might be necessary to adjust the sampling rates. The default sampling rate of 2% assumes a very busy application server. We want to specify an appropriately high sampling rate to capture statistically significant information about the transactions, and yet not overload the database with too much similar, statistically irrelevant information. Note: This is a rule-of-thumb example for calculating an initial sampling rate. We require at least five transactions per workload transaction mix per minute. If we have five different invoked transactions throughout the day, we will want to collect 25 transactions per minute (five times five equals 25). If the application server has approximately 200 total hits per minute, we set the sampling rate to 13%. In this example, 25 divided by 200 is approximately 13%.76 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • 2. Calculate an appropriate estimated sampling rate for the remote WebSphere Application Server to be monitored. See the previous Note. In the lab environment where we developed this guide, we used a Trader application to generate adjustable transaction loads. See Appendix A, “Additional material” on page 111 for obtaining the additional material. In the development environment for this guide, we used monitoring level L3 with 100% sampling rate. Important: When you monitor a production application server, do not use L3 for more than a few minutes because this might adversely affect performance of the application server. You can also use scheduling to dynamically collect L3 information periodically.3. Select ADMINISTRATION → Monitoring On Demand® from the menu to view each individual application server node’s monitoring level.4. A dialog similar to that shown in Figure 4-39 opens. Click the orange arrow icon for the appropriate node.Figure 4-39 Monitoring On Demand Chapter 4. Implementation of ITCAM for WebSphere service 77
  • 5. You can change these values, or create or change a scheduled time for collecting information, as shown in Figure 4-40. Click OK to close this window. Figure 4-40 Changing the monitoring level You have reviewed the newly installed and configured data collector’s monitoring and sampling rates and possibly adjusted them for your environment.4.4.3 Defining server groups IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere supports the grouping and aggregation of information obtained from instrumented application servers. Server groups provide this functionality. These groupings make the viewing and reporting of aggregated information as well as assigning access to IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere information easy and effective. The following list provides some basic examples of helpful server groupings: The enterprise overview enables users to understand the behavior of their application servers at a glance, by graphically displaying throughput and response time of server groups. In this case, the grouping of servers helps to provide a high-level overview for a complex multi-server environment. Using server groups for report generation enables us to run reports against a combined group of servers instead of running separate reports against each individual application server. Another option that server grouping gives us is a more granular authorization capability because we can grant access to servers at the group level. Server grouping is also helpful if we want to change the monitoring level of several servers at the same time. Further examples of useful server grouping strategies include grouping by cell or node, operating system, physical location, or responsibility. For instance, we can group application servers according to the teams of people who are responsible78 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • for managing them and then grant access through these different servergroupings to the appropriate team members.Initially, all the instrumented and configured application servers reside in ageneric group called unassigned servers. We assign them to server groups thatwe create:1. Click the menu item HOME and click the Group tab. A list of the unassigned servers is shown, similar to Figure 4-41.Figure 4-41 Unassigned servers2. From the menu, select ADMINISTRATION → Server Management → Server Groups.3. Click the Create Groups link to create a new group.4. Enter All for the group name. Scroll down to the Group Members section and select, then add, all available servers to the Servers in Group window by clicking the Add button. Click Save to create this server group.To create helpful server groupings, consider: The number of servers to monitor: Does the grouping make sense. The organization and processes that are used for monitoring the environment: Who is responsible for what servers and applications, who needs to have access to what server information. Chapter 4. Implementation of ITCAM for WebSphere service 79
  • How reporting is used: What reports are necessary, what type, and how many reports are manual and how many are scheduled. In the lab environment, we created three server groups called All, Trader, and WPS on WAS, as shown in Figure 4-42. Figure 4-42 Server groups In a shared server environment, depending on the requirements for accuracy in the enterprise overview perspective, grouping servers from an application point of view can be an effective option. In Figure 4-43 on page 81, the group Trader_CICS_distr is an example of a server group that is grouped by application. IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere allows a server to be assigned as a member of several groups. This enables the creation of server groups from an application point of view, which includes transactions that share servers with other applications. In this example, there are several WebSphere Application Servers that access the same CICS and IMS systems. These application servers are members of several groups. For example, the IMS server is part of the IMS distributed group and also the IMS zOS group. Note: Using shared servers in server groups might cause misinterpretations in the enterprise overview because transactions are not distinguished at component level. For example, every server group that contains the same shared CICS server will see all transactions from this CICS server. The number of requests and response times aggregated in the Enterprise View tab will include transactions triggered by servers that are not part of the group. Figure 4-43 on page 81 shows a grouping of servers from an application perspective. Note the performance patterns for groups IMS_distributed and Trader_CICS_distributed: There have not been any IMS activities during this period of time. The explanation for this possibly misleading information is that80 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • both CICS and IMS transactions run on the same WebSphere Application Server.Figure 4-43 Server group by application You have now defined server groups and assigned data collector information sources to them in a meaningful and useful way. This server grouping capability enables effective viewing, analysis, and reporting of monitoring information in unique customer environments.4.4.4 Defining operators So far we have only defined the administrator user called itcamadm during the installation process. In a multi-user ITCAM for WebSphere environment, it is Chapter 4. Implementation of ITCAM for WebSphere service 81
  • advisable to create multiple separate users. To define a new user for ITCAM for WebSphere, perform the following steps: 1. Create a user ID on the operating system where the IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere managing server is installed: – Use computer management on Windows system. – Use smit for AIX system. – Use adduser command on Linux system. – Alternatively, use the appropriate tools for your server platform. Our managing server is installed on Windows. Therefore, we define an additional user, oper1, using the computer manager utility and assigning a password that never expires. See Figure 4-44.Figure 4-44 Operating system user create 2. Review the different user roles that are available. This is performed from the Web console. From the menu, select ADMINISTRATION → Account Management → Role Configuration to review the available default roles. Note that an operator cannot create new users, server groups, and so on. These roles can be modified for a customer’s environment, if necessary. 3. Define an IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere user. Select ADMINISTRATION → Account Management → User Profiles. 4. Enter the required information in the fields marked with an asterisk. Assign one or more defined server groups to this user using the Group Access portion of the window in the bottom section, as shown in Figure 4-45 on page 83. In our example, this operator has been assigned access only to the Traders server group with the role of Operator. Click Save to create this new operator. You have created a new operator with appropriate access privileges.82 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • Figure 4-45 Creating the IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager operator Note: The operator name in IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere and the operating system user name do not have to be the same. You can also define many ITCAM for WebSphere operators with unique passwords using the same operating system user. This might be confusing for administrative purposes. We recommend that you use a unique operating system user for each ITCAM for WebSphere operator. Furthermore, the ITCAM for WebSphere operator must have the same password as the operating system login to avoid any confusion.It is important to consider how ITCAM for WebSphere will be used in yourenvironment and who will use it. The solution produces reports that can berelevant to operational managers as well as service or application developmentmanagers. Identifying the roles and responsibilities is an important considerationbecause this affects the customization of ITCAM for WebSphere, especially infeatures such as server groups. Chapter 4. Implementation of ITCAM for WebSphere service 83
  • 4.5 Run initial data collection The initial data collection should be performed in the following steps: 1. Observe transaction rate and response time. You can perform this from either the Recent Activity Display or Request/Transaction report as discussed in 3.2, “WebSphere Application Server monitoring” on page 44 and 3.3, “Generating performance report” on page 45. 2. If necessary, adjust the server group property threshold, as indicated by the result of your monitoring. 3. Set up recurring report generation. You might need a generic Request/Transaction report and TOP report to spot trends, initial problem determination and information collection. See 3.3, “Generating performance report” on page 45. 4. Leave monitoring on for at least 24 hours.4.6 Collect performance reports The detailed data collection should be performed for any potential problem that the customer might have. The potential problem transaction can be analyzed from the recurring report from: Excessive CPU usage (Top CPU report) Excessive response time (Top response time report) Major workload (Top transaction report) You may also run additional reports: Memory usage patterns to identify any memory leak Hourly usage patterns to show peak hours and generate transaction reports for the peak hours Identify any erratic response time, large differences between maximum and average response time4.7 Run detailed data collection The detailed data collection process varies greatly depending on your findings regarding the performance problem. Some possible paths are: Consistently high CPU and response time: This is typically a problem with the Java application. A detailed (L2/L3) trace on ITCAM for WebSphere should reveal the offending method.84 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • Consistently high response time, but low CPU usage: This might be a problem outside WebSphere, such as access to a database or back-end server. SQL report with L2 trace or composite application analysis might show more indications of the problem. Erratic response time: Problem might be caused by data input. A detailed trace is required on occasions when bad response time occurs. Rare peak of response time: This is typically caused by locking or deadlock of resources. Might require locking analysis, which involves modifying the instrumentation property file and must include restarting the application server. Memory leak problem must also be run with modification of instrumentation property file and has to include restarting of application server. We will provide the procedure for the following tasks: 4.7.1, “Scheduling monitoring level changes” on page 85 4.7.2, “Getting transaction trace” on page 85 4.7.3, “Performing lock analysis” on page 89 4.7.4, “Performing memory leak analysis” on page 934.7.1 Scheduling monitoring level changes Monitoring level changes for information collection can be performed from the ADMINISTRATION → Monitoring on Demand page. This enables monitoring level changes to happen automatically under minimal human intervention.4.7.2 Getting transaction trace While the monitoring level is on the detailed level, you can run offending transactions that you want to investigate. This will enable you to collect detailed performance data in a controlled environment. Remember that having a more detailed trace also adds the monitoring overhead of the system. When the transaction has been performed and monitoring level is back to normal, you can retrieve the transaction trace from the reporting function. Use PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS → Create Transaction Report → Request/Transaction and identify the potential candidate. The detailed report page will show the offending classes and methods. You can perform the response time problem investigation directly from the ITCAM for WebSphere Web console. Operators who monitor online response times from the summary monitoring views can identify response time problems immediately. Chapter 4. Implementation of ITCAM for WebSphere service 85
  • One approach is to use the recent activity display. From the main menu, select PROBLEM DETERMINATION → Server Activity → Activity Display. You can quickly identify any recently executing transaction and its response time, as shown in Figure 4-46.Figure 4-46 Recent activity display The recent activity display shows only some of the most current transactions that are executing and observed by the data collector. This information is retrieved directly from the data collector.86 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • Another approach is to show the request or transaction report for transactionproblems that are no longer visible in the recent activity display. SelectPERFORMANCE ANALYSIS → Create Application Reports →Request/Transaction. Select the appropriate time frame with the Time Series inHours axis option. The initial report shows response time breakdown by hour, asshown in Figure 4-47.Figure 4-47 Response time distribution Chapter 4. Implementation of ITCAM for WebSphere service 87
  • Click the peak response time to drill into the data and see the decomposition chart, as shown in Figure 4-48. To further drill into the response time information, you can sort the application/transaction information by response time or percentage. Alternatively, you can double-click the section of the pie (showing percentage). Figure 4-48 Decomposition chart88 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • This opens a more-detailed reports data table that lists the instances of the named transaction with detailed information specific to each of these transactions, as shown in Figure 4-49.Figure 4-49 Transaction list response time You can identify the response time problem, whether it occurs erratically or consistently, for every transaction.4.7.3 Performing lock analysis Problems with object locking in application servers are often hard to identify. Typical symptoms of a locking problem are erratic response time and occasional timeouts with an HTTP return code of 500. These symptoms are typical of a deadlock issue, although they can also be caused by bad data and programming. This section discusses lock analysis on the assumption that we have already identified a locking problem in an application. You must prepare and activate the lock analysis facility within ITCAM for WebSphere before you can use it. Chapter 4. Implementation of ITCAM for WebSphere service 89
  • To prepare for lock analysis, perform the following steps: 1. Increase the monitoring level to L2 or L3. After resolving the problem, ensure that you set the monitoring level back to L1. To temporarily override the monitoring level: a. From the menu, select ADMINISTRATION → Monitoring On Demand. b. Select the link under Schedule Change/Override, as shown in Figure 4-50. Figure 4-50 Selecting server for monitoring level change c. Set the monitoring level to at least (L2) Problem Determination Mode in the Server Setting Options window, as shown in Figure 4-51. Figure 4-51 Changing monitoring level to L2 2. Before you perform lock analysis, enable the data collector for lock analysis. You must modify the data collector’s property file cyn.user.classes.xml, located in the $DC_HOME/etc/ directory. The cyn.user.classes.xml file is referenced from the bcm.properties file in the userbcm.xmlfilename parameter. The lockAnalysis tag determines whether the class should be instrumented for the lock analysis feature. Example 4-3 on page 91 shows that all classes matching insuNetWeb.* are instrumented for lock analysis because the value true is specified for lockAnalysis.90 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • Example 4-3 Enabling lock analysis<defineInstrumentation> <enableSignature>true</enableSignature> <userClasses> <selectClass> <mask>insuNetWeb.*</mask> <methods> <methodName>*</methodName> </methods> <ignoreTrivial>true</ignoreTrivial> <lockAnalysis>true</lockAnalysis> <objectAllocations> <allocateClass>*</allocateClass> </objectAllocations> <objectAllocationTimes>true</objectAllocationTimes> </selectClass> </userClasses></defineInstrumentation>If the data collector does not have lock analysis instrumentation activated, lockanalysis will not work and you will see the following message:CYNVE0851E Lock analysis data is not being collected.After you complete the two-step enablement process, perform the lock analysisusing the Web console:1. From the menu bar, select PROBLEM DETERMINATION → Server Activity Display.2. On the Server Activity Display page (Figure 4-52 on page 92), you can determine and verify that: – InsuNetWeb application is still hanging at the quoteAction component. – Resident Time and Idle Time show hours. – The Thread Status is Waiting. This indicates that the thread has probably entered a deadlock state. – The concrete Java class that is probably causing this deadlock is insunet.web.actions.QuoteAction. Chapter 4. Implementation of ITCAM for WebSphere service 91
  • Figure 4-52 Server activity display You can confirm the same information by selecting the Lock Contentions tab and viewing the list of locks in this same component. 3. Select Cancel Requests, causing the lock contention to check the request detail page shown in Figure 4-53. Note the available details on this page. Click OK to cancel the request. Figure 4-53 Cancelling request for Lock contention92 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • 4. On the left-side navigator menu, select Link Method/Component Trace to generate a detailed Complete Flow View, as shown in Figure 4-54. From this report perspective, you can identify what method in what class caused the lock contention. In this example, the class is insunet.web.action.QuoteTransaction and the method is synchronize_update.Figure 4-54 Flow view The lock analysis investigation process has provided sufficient information to enable a development team to fix the malfunctioning code.4.7.4 Performing memory leak analysis Memory is a key resource that is allocated to an application server for use by the application components running on it. Complications arise when memory is used by components and erroneously not returned back to the system for reuse by the application. This memory leak condition is critical for long-running, mission-critical application servers that do not get restarted for long periods of time. Chapter 4. Implementation of ITCAM for WebSphere service 93
  • ITCAM for WebSphere supports detailed analysis of memory that is allocated to application servers. You can perform memory leak analysis using the following three steps: “Investigating a potential memory leak” on page 94 “Narrowing the cause of a memory leak” on page 97 “Determining the memory leak offender” on page 98 Investigating a potential memory leak When a memory leak situation is suspected, investigation begins. The investigation consists of: Memory leak confirmation reports Trend reports for slower leaks Using traps to alert for low memory In this section, we show only the memory leak confirmation report. ITCAM for WebSphere has pre-built reports that are useful for determining whether memory growth is related to memory leak activity. To access these reports, select PROBLEM DETERMINATION → Memory Diagnosis → Memory Leak. The Step 1: Memory Leak Confirmation Report window (Figure 4-55) shows three types of reports. Each report is labeled according to the question it answers and the data it presents. Figure 4-55 Three pre-built memory leak reports for memory leak confirmation The first report option graphs memory growth over time. Memory growth is only shown after garbage collection (GC) because this represents the real amount of used memory. However, memory growth can also occur because there are more users or more activities causing more Java objects to be allocated. The second report option presents memory growth as a function of users. The third report option plots memory growth as a function of transaction volume.94 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • Figure 4-56 shows an upward memory growth trend even though the number oflive sessions remains relatively steady in the range of 50 sessions. Such anupward memory growth trend coupled with steady session metrics indicates thata memory leak is likely.Figure 4-56 Memory growth with a constant average number of live sessionsSimilarly, the report for heap size after GC compared to the number of requestshelps to indicate whether server load is affecting memory growth. Activelyexecuting Java methods adds objects to memory heap load as they completetheir tasks. As soon as these requests are finished, memory usage should befreed accordingly. Chapter 4. Implementation of ITCAM for WebSphere service 95
  • Figure 4-57 shows a slow upward growth in memory usage for the first 45 minutes with a corresponding large number of requests per minute. When these requests drop to zero in the last 15 minutes of the graph, the heap size flattens but does not drop as expected. This graph indicates that there could be a memory leak because the rise in memory occurs with a consistent average number of requests but does not fall when the number of requests falls. Figure 4-57 Heap size does not decrease when the number of requests drops Note: The three canned reports in the memory leak report are more useful than the three offered in the memory analysis report’s JVM heap size section. The memory leak reports use the average heap size after GC as their baseline. However, the memory analysis canned reports use JVM heap size. When you investigate memory leaks, we recommend that you perform a GC so that no allocated but unused objects reside in memory when determining the memory size. By default, the three memory leak graphs show the past 60 minutes of data. This time range might be too narrow. There is an option to change the graph range to the past 48 hours. You can change any of the mapped metrics as well as the server and group selected to quickly compare a different server’s memory growth. To detect a slower memory leak, use the trend report from system reports to generate a report of memory growth over a period of several weeks.96 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • Narrowing the cause of a memory leakWhen a leak is suspected, ITCAM for WebSphere provides a Step 2: MemoryLeak Candidate Finder Report that helps to identify potential leaking classes.The leak candidate report takes two snapshots of the suspected memory leakingJVM. It compares the older snapshot to the newer one to determine whichobjects have increased their size between the snapshots.Specify the server group, server, and the wait time, as shown in Figure 4-58. Thewait time specifies how long to wait before taking the second snapshot of theJVM heap. This wait time depends on the rate of growth of the leak. If an initialmemory leak investigation indicates a noticeable growth in just an hour, then await time of as little as 5 to 10 minutes might be sufficient. If the noticeablegrowth is in the order of a day or more, then you must wait for a few hours. Note: Ideally you must take the snapshot when there is little or no load to ensure that all the objects are in use.Figure 4-58 Configuring memory leak candidate finder Note: You can take the JVM heap snapshots with the monitoring level at L1, L2, or L3.When the report has finished collecting both snapshots, click the server name toshow the analysis report for the first snapshot. The same report is available forthe second snapshot. This report shows the objects that were in memory whenthe snapshot was made and the associated metrics such as the percentage ofmemory they consumed.The comparison data report is more useful than individual JVM heap snapshotreports because it shows only classes that have changed between the two Chapter 4. Implementation of ITCAM for WebSphere service 97
  • snapshots. Figure 4-59 shows the comparison report sorted by the change in the number of instances of live objects in memory. The top entries in this heap comparison results table are the most likely memory leak candidates because these are the classes that have grown the most. We use these classes to determine the cause of the memory leak.Figure 4-59 Memory Leak candidate comparison report Tip: Classes that are filtered out by the monitoring configuration installation defaults are excluded from this analysis. Although you might not want to monitor basic classes such as strings and lists, these objects can often be a source of leaks and should be examined. To do this, clear the exclude section of the class name filter option and click Apply to see everything in the heap. (This is done dynamically without re-executing the report.) Selectively exclude classes and packages that you determine are not a concern. Sort the columns from most to least that show changes in the number of instances. This will result in a richer view of the objects that are growing in memory. Determining the memory leak offender After you identify the potential leaking classes, the next step is to determine which classes are actually causing the leak. The Step 3: Memory Leak Diagnosis98 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • Report finds the most-leaked objects and shows the class, method, and linenumber of the allocating class of leaked objects. This detailed information, downto the code line number, helps a programmer to determine the trouble spots ofcode.To set up this report, reconfigure the data collector to monitor the suspectedgrowing classes that you identified using the technique described in “Narrowing thecause of a memory leak” on page 97. The memory leak diagnosis report is set upusing an XML file on the data collector installed machine in the $DC_HOME/etc/directory. The bcm.properties file has a key/value pair called userbcm.xmlfilenamethat identifies which XML configuration file is used. Adjusting the bcm.propertiesfiles allows for multiple XML files to be swapped in and out. Note: ITCAM for WebSphere generates a server-specific bcm.properties file called <host name>.<app server name>.bcm.properties. When you change the original bcm.properties, you must delete the generated version so that ITCAM for WebSphere can regenerate the bcm.properties file.The XML file is composed of multiple sections of selectClass tags that identifyhow to treat classes matching the mask pattern. The XML snippet inExample 4-4 shows the modification that is required to monitor memory leaks.Example 4-4 XML for monitoring memory leak<selectClass> <mask>*</mask> <methods> <methodName>*</methodName> </methods> <ignoreTrivial>true</ignoreTrivial> <lockAnalysis>true</lockAnalysis> <objectAllocations> <allocateClass>*</allocateClass> </objectAllocations> <objectAllocationTimes>true</objectAllocationTimes></selectClass>Only classes found inside the allocateClass tag are monitored as potential leaks.An asterisk in the tag monitors all classes for leaks. A better strategy is to replacethe asterisk with the top class names identified from the Step 2: Memory LeakCandidate Finder Report (Figure 4-59 on page 98) for further analysis. If Step 2does not offer any good candidates, using the asterisk means that all of theobjects are monitored. This will have an adverse impact on performance. Chapter 4. Implementation of ITCAM for WebSphere service 99
  • If you set the objectAllocationTimes tag to true, this activates and populates the growth percentage and growth rate columns. This can help to show the rate of growth in the objects. Important: The diagnosis report is functional only in L3 mode. It can slow down a production system severely and should be used only in controlled test situations. The Memory Leak Diagnosis Report is Step 3 of the memory leak report. You select the group and server to get to the report’s table. The report result is a very wide table. Figure 4-60 on page 101 shows the overall result.100 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • Figure 4-60 Memory leak diagnosis report By default, the Growth Rate column is sorted so that the fastest-growing classes are shown at the top of the table. The columns that indicate the allocating class of the leaking object are very useful and important. This information directs the programmer where to look and suggests why the classes might be leaking. Chapter 4. Implementation of ITCAM for WebSphere service 101
  • Note: If you have not set objectAllocationTimes, there will be no growth rate data. Thus, the default sort will not be useful and we suggest another sorting of this information. Sorting by the Number of Objects Surviving Last GC column might be effective.4.8 Develop the finding report The finding reports consists of reporting whatever performance indication you found in 4.6, “Collect performance reports” on page 84 and 4.7, “Run detailed data collection” on page 84. Some ideas that you might include in the report are: Transaction load profile Daily transaction profile Transaction investigated Problem transaction resolution Memory usage report Server resource report Some recommendations that you can make are: CPU capacity Memory size Transaction analysis4.9 Remove the data collector The following procedure removes the data collector: 1. Unconfigure WebSphere instances. Use the data collector configuration wizard for other application server instances using the appropriate script in the $DC_HOME/config_dc directory. In Figure 4-61, choose the unconfigure option. Figure 4-61 Configuration option dialog102 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • Important: You have to unconfigure all data collectors before you uninstall the software. Failure to perform unconfiguration will result in failure upon starting WebSphere Application Server.2. Uninstall ITCAM for WebSphere data collector using the $ITCAM_HOME_uninstuninstall program. Chapter 4. Implementation of ITCAM for WebSphere service 103
  • 104 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • 5 Chapter 5. Complementary solutions for ITCAM for WebSphere engagement This chapter discusses additional complementary solutions that can be performed in conjunction with the ITCAM for WebSphere offering. The discussion consists of: 5.1, “Cross-sell and up-sell” on page 106 5.2, “Additional solutions” on page 106 5.3, “Enhancement solutions” on page 109© Copyright IBM Corp. 2006. All rights reserved. 105
  • 5.1 Cross-sell and up-sell The basic solutions described in previous chapters should meet the needs of many customers, but others might need added functions to meet their business requirements. To extend the solution for your customers, you should work with them to understand their business objectives and requirements. The following questions should be addressed for your customers: What are their critical business functions or components? What technology extensions will improve business productivity? How will these additional components add value? How will business-specific ISV applications integrate into this offering? Functions can be proposed to fulfill these additional customer requirements. These are typically called cross-sell (for solutions that provide additional functions) and up-sell (for solutions that provide enhancement functions that extend the functions of the basic solution). This chapter explains some of the possible solutions that you can provide to your customers in conjunction with ITCAM for WebSphere solution.5.2 Additional solutions The following solutions enable better management for the entire application solution: 5.2.1, “Managing and analyzing response time” on page 106 5.2.2, “Working with messaging infrastructure” on page 107 5.2.3, “Managing Web Services and SOA infrastructure” on page 1085.2.1 Managing and analyzing response time Response time is a major satisfaction factor from end user to the service provided by an IT shop. In a Web-based environment, these end users can reside in any location in the world. Performance and response time management is getting even harder because some of the performance factors are outside of the IT shop responsibilities, such as network devices on the Internet. IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for Response Time Tracking (ITCAM for Response Time Tracking) enables an IT shop to collect response time information using an industry-standard Application Response Measurement facility. It can collect user-based response time as well as server response time. It can also break down the overall response time components to identify potential problem106 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • sources. It can distinguish network response compared to the system response time. Response time management can also identify areas in the application that are critical and must be tuned to allow better throughput. ITCAM for Response Time Tracking enables you to perform these facilities and more. Figure 5-1 shows a sample ITCAM for Response Time Tracking response time topology report. Figure 5-1 ITCAM for Response Time Tracking topology report The report in Figure 5-1 shows that the transaction spans three machines from the components shown there. The number in the boxes are average response time and maximum response time, respectively. From tracing the transaction flow, you can identify which component actually causes the performance problem or performs longer than others.5.2.2 Working with messaging infrastructure Some enterprise applications use messaging to allow asynchronous processing of events. We offer management of WebSphere MQ messaging infrastructure using the IBM Tivoli OMEGAMON for Messaging V6.0 product. Chapter 5. Complementary solutions for ITCAM for WebSphere engagement 107
  • IBM Tivoli OMEGAMON for Messaging enables you to monitor the WebSphere MQ messaging subsystem and critical properties. It also provides a configuration application that eases many aspect of WebSphere MQ resources configuration. The performance and configuration of the WebSphere MQ messaging subsystem is critical and often tied in to the WebSphere-based application performance. Monitoring and managing the messaging infrastructure would greatly enhance the overall performance monitoring environment. Figure 5-2 shows a sample portal page for OMEGAMON for Messaging. Figure 5-2 IBM Tivoli OMEGAMON for Messaging page5.2.3 Managing Web Services and SOA infrastructure As more and more enterprises move to a service-oriented architecture (SOA) with Web Services enabled for critical enterprise functions, monitoring and managing your SOA environment is getting even more critical than ever.108 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • Web Services can be viewed as a remote function call through the network. This function generally allows an open-ended application design that would not be aware of the caller. Anyone with the proper credentials and message format can invoke the function. Managing the SOA environment with ITCAM for SOA includes the following features: Get Web Services performance metrics, such as message rate, message length, and response time Control which IP address ranges are allowed to invoke certain Web services Analyze Web Services call sources and interactions5.3 Enhancement solutions Additional functions can also be deployed: 5.3.1, “Enabling a split server for load balancing and reliability” on page 109 5.3.2, “Security enhancement” on page 110 5.3.3, “Integrating performance monitoring with the portal solution” on page 110 5.3.4, “Collecting performance information in Tivoli Data Warehouse” on page 1105.3.1 Enabling a split server for load balancing and reliability When the environment grows larger or transaction rates increase such that the managing server is not expected to be able to cope with the current processing load, the split server implementation can be performed. The split server environment allows the separation of the database server, visualization engine, and the kernel components to reside in different machines. This enables more processing power than what is originally available with a single large machine. The split server environment also allows for a redundancy factor to be instated. Each kernel component can back up the others and processing can be sustained even with one of the kernel servers down. Chapter 5. Complementary solutions for ITCAM for WebSphere engagement 109
  • 5.3.2 Security enhancement Additional security considerations are available by implementing SSL encryption for data communication in ITCAM for WebSphere components. The SSL encryption ensures that the communication content between the managing server and data collectors is private. SSL encryption is achieved using a set of certificates that are generated, and trust relationships are established between different holders of the certificates. These trust relationships are in the form of public keys that are used to decode the sender’s communication streams. Additional facility of the security enhancement is the use of firewalls between the managing server and data collectors. Typically a data collector resides in the production network, but the managing server resides in the administrative network, so there might be firewalls between them. ITCAM for WebSphere provides a facility called port consolidator to minimize the number of open ports in the firewall.5.3.3 Integrating performance monitoring with the portal solution With the new IBM Tivoli Monitoring V6.1 platform, IBM offers an integrated performance monitoring interface called Tivoli Enterprise Portal. It is a desktop or Web-based Java console that allows monitoring of different aspect of resources. ITCAM for WebSphere also provides a data interface to the Tivoli Enterprise Portal for WebSphere performance metrics. This provides a uniform performance management interface for all of your IT resources. This portal solution with Tivoli Enterprise Portal enables you to develop your own workspaces that suit the needs of your customers.5.3.4 Collecting performance information in Tivoli Data Warehouse Another way to get information in Tivoli Enterprise Portal is to have the data historically collected for analysis in the Tivoli Data Warehouse. This enables you to store offline data analysis that you can retrieve any time later regarding your WebSphere performance.110 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • A Appendix A. Additional material This IBM Redbook refers to additional material that can be downloaded from the Internet as described below.Locating the Web material The Web material associated with this book is available in softcopy on the Internet from the IBM Redbooks Web server. Point your Web browser to: ftp://www.redbooks.ibm.com/redbooks/SG247293 Alternatively, you can go to the IBM Redbooks Web site at: ibm.com/redbooks Select Additional materials and open the directory that corresponds with the redbook form number, SG247293.Using the Web material Additional Web material that accompanies this book includes the following files: File name Description SG247293.zip Zipped additional material SG247293.readme Readable text of the content description© Copyright IBM Corp. 2006. All rights reserved. 111
  • The archive contains the following files: 7293tasks.xls Sample tasks estimation spreadsheet 7293sow.doc Sample statement of work 7293rep.doc Sample report document 7293pre.ppt Sample finding presentation TraderDBSvc.ear Sample server ear file TraderClient.ear Sample client ear file Loader.jar Sample load applicationSystem requirements for downloading the Web material The following system configuration is recommended: Hard disk space: 5 MB of free space Operating system: Windows 2000 or XP with Microsoft Office suite Web application: WebSphere Application Server V5.1.1 or V6.0How to use the Web material Create a subdirectory (folder) on your workstation, and unzip the contents of the Web material zip file into this folder.112 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • Abbreviations and acronymsAIX Advanced Interactive JVM Java Virtual Machine Executive JVMTI Java Virtual Machine ToolAPPC Advanced Program to Interface Program Communication MVS Multiple Virtual StorageBCM Byte Code Modification ORS Original Request StringBTAM Basic Telecommunication OTMA Open Transaction Manager Access Method AccessCD-ROM compact disc read-only PDF Portable Document Format memory PMI Performance ManagementCICS Customer Information Control Interface System RHEL Red Hat Enterprise LinuxCMDB Configuration Management Database SLES SUSE Linux Enterprise ServerCPU central processing unit SMF System Measurement FacilityCRM Customer Relationship Management SNMP Simple Network Management ProtocolCTG CICS Transaction Gateway SOA service-oriented architectureDB2 Database 2™ SOAP Simple Object AccessEJB Enterprise JavaBeans ProtocolESE Enterprise Server Edition SQL Structured Query LanguageGUI Graphical User Interface SSL Secure Socket LayerHTTP Hyper Text Transfer Protocol TCP/IP Transmission Control ProtocolIBM International Business Internet Protocol Machines Corp. TEP Tivoli Enterprise PortalIMS Information Management UDB Universal Database System URI Uniform Resource IdentifierITSO International Technical Support Organization URL Universal Resource LocatorJ2C Java 2 Connectivity VTAM® Virtual Telecommunication Access MethodJ2EE Java 2 Platform, Enterprise Edition WBI WebSphere Business IntegrationJCA Java Connector Architecture WSAM WebSphere StudioJDBC Java Database Connectivity Application MonitorJMX Java Management Extension XML Extensible Markup LanguageJSP™ JavaServer™ Pages™© Copyright IBM Corp. 2006. All rights reserved. 113
  • 114 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • Related publications The publications listed in this section are considered particularly suitable for a more detailed discussion of the topics covered in this book.IBM Redbooks For information about ordering these publications, see “How to get IBM Redbooks” on page 117. Note that some of the documents referenced here might be available in softcopy only. Deployment Guide Series: IBM Tivoli Monitoring Express Version 6.1, SG24-7217 Getting Started with IBM Tivoli Monitoring 6.1 on Distributed Environments, SG24-7143 IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager V6.0 Family: Installation, Configuration, and Basic Usage, SG24-7151 Implementing IBM Tivoli OMEGAMON XE for WebSphere Business Integration V1.1, SG24-6768 Installing WebSphere Studio Application Monitor V3.1, SG24-6491 Large Scale Implementation for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere, REDP-4162 WebSphere Studio Application Monitor V3.2 Advanced Usage Guide, SG24-6764Other publications IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere publications: IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere Installation and Customization Guide, GC32-9506 IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere Operator’s Guide, SC32-9508 IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere Problem Determination Guide, SC32-9509© Copyright IBM Corp. 2006. All rights reserved. 115
  • IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere User’s Guide, SC32-9507 IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere: Installing and Configuring the Tivoli Enterprise Monitoring Agent, SC32-1801 IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere: Tivoli Enterprise Monitoring Agent Problem Determination Guide, SC32-1800Online resources These Web sites and URLs are also relevant as further information sources: Product online documentation http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/tivihelp/v3r1/index.jsp?toc =/com.ibm.itcamwas.doc/toc.xml Product prerequisites information http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/tividd/td/ITCAMWAS/prereq60/en_US/HTML /itcam6.html ITCAM product home page http://www-306.ibm.com/software/tivoli/products/composite-applicatio n-mgr-websphere/ IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere product support link http://www-306.ibm.com/software/sysmgmt/products/support/IBMTivoliCo mpositeApplicationManagerforWebSphere.html WebSphere fix packs links – ftp://ftp.software.ibm.com/software/websphere/appserv/support/fixpa cks/was60/refreshpack1/Windows – ftp://ftp.software.ibm.com/software/websphere/appserv/support/fixpa cks/was60/refreshpack1/Linux Microsoft Help and Support article 899522 http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;899522 Microsoft Windows Services for UNIX http://www.microsoft.com/technet/interopmigration/unix/sfu/default.m spx116 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • How to get IBM Redbooks You can search for, view, or download Redbooks, Redpapers, Hints and Tips, draft publications and Additional materials, as well as order hardcopy Redbooks or CD-ROMs, at this Web site: ibm.com/redbooksHelp from IBM IBM Support and downloads ibm.com/support IBM Global Services ibm.com/services Related publications 117
  • 118 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • IndexA E EJB usage 3adduser command 82 embedded installation 52allocateClass 99 embedded WebSphere installation 56am-start.sh command 71 Enterprise JavaBeans (EJB) 3, 20Apache Web server 5application server 3archive agents 5 G garbage collection (GC) 94 global publishing server 5BBCM (Byte Code Modification) 7 I IBM HTTP Server 5C IMS 5CICS 5 ITCAM for WebSpherecommand components 4 adduser 82 data collector 6 am-start.sh 71 database 6 setup_DC_w32 63 lock analysis 89 smit 82 managing server 4configuration library 73 platforms 8configuring data collector 72console, visualization engine 71cross-memory services 6 J J2EE 5 J2EE application environment 20D J2EE application server 3data collection 72 Java 2 Connector (J2C) 20data collector 5 Java Database Connectivity (JDBC) 2, 20 CICS 5 Java Virtual Machine Tool Interface, see JVMTI configuration 72 JVM thread pools 3 IMS 5 JVMTI 3 installing 62 J2EE 5 profile 73 K server configuration 72 kernels 5database connection pools 3DB2 installation 52 M managing server 5DB2 UDB 5 archive agents 5default monitoring level 76 global publishing server 5diagnostics 75 installing 48 kernels 5 message dispatcher 5© Copyright IBM Corp. 2006. All rights reserved. 119
  • modifying for another site 61 V polling agents 5 Virtual Frame Buffer 5 publishing servers 5 visualization engine watchdog 5 console 71memory leak cause 97 determining offender 98 W watchdog 5message dispatcher 5 Web Services 20monitoring level 75 WebSphere default 76 installation 56 L1, Production Mode 75 L2, Problem Determination Mode 75 L3, Tracing Mode 75 XMS 5 X Window System 5 Xvfb 5Oobject locking 89objectAllocationTimes 100OCTIGATE database 6OMEGAMON XE 3operator definition 81Oracle 5PPerformance Management Interface (PMI) 3polling agents 5publishing servers 5RRedbooks Web site 117 Contact us xresponse time problem 85Ssampling rate 75selectClass 99server grouping 78Server Activity Display (SAD) 92Servlets 20setup_DC_w32 command 63SMF 3smit command 82SNMP 5SOAP 70Sun Solaris 5System Measurement Facility, see SMF120 Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere
  • Solution Deployment Guide for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere (0.2”spine) 0.17”<->0.473” 90<->249 pages
  • Back cover ®Solution Deployment Guide forIBM Tivoli CompositeApplication Manager forWebSphereQuickly start a This IBM Redbook is written for services professionals who areservices responsible for developing, selling, and implementing INTERNATIONALengagement with customer-based service engagements. The book focuses on TECHNICALITCAM for implementation services for IBM Tivoli Composite Application SUPPORTWebSphere Manager for WebSphere V6.0. ORGANIZATION IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere is aStatement of work performance management solution for WebSphere Applicationsamples and scope Server-based applications. It enables monitoring of various BUILDING TECHNICALdevelopment performance aspects of WebSphere Application Servers and INFORMATION BASED ONassistance provides valuable assistance in finding and removing application PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE bottlenecks. This implementation service for IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere is suitable for customers withIncludes sample IBM Redbooks are developed by multiple mission-critical applications deployed on WebSpherecode and installation the IBM International Technical Application Server. Support Organization. Expertsinstructions This book explains the fundamental aspects of services engagement from IBM, Customers and and Statement of Work creation. We explore in detail how to analyze Partners from around the world create timely technical the effort required for implementing the solution. We also provide information based on realistic several additional add-ons that you might be able to package in the scenarios. Specific implementation service. recommendations are provided to help you implement IT This book is meant to be used in conjunction with Deployment Guide solutions more effectively in Series: IBM Tivoli Composite Application Manager for WebSphere your environment. V6.0, SG24-7252. We will not cover deployment in detail; we are more focused on building the service engagement package. For more information: ibm.com/redbooks SG24-7293-00 ISBN 073849464X