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Ibm tivoli web access for information management sg246823

  1. 1. Front coverIBM Tivoli Web Accessfor InformationManagementMove your help desk to the WebGet tips for installing Web AccessLearn about the HTMLgenerator Don Miller Mimi Michelet Michael Bacon Maryann Goldman Rollin Hippler Pete Louis Tom Shultzibm.com/redbooks
  2. 2. International Technical Support OrganizationIBM Tivoli Web Access for Information ManagementApril 2003 SG24-6823-00
  3. 3. Note: Before using this information and the product it supports, read the information in “Notices” on page vii.First Edition (April 2003)This edition applies to Release 1 of IBM Tivoli Web Access for Information Management (product number5698-WAI).© Copyright International Business Machines Corporation 2003. All rights reserved.Note to U.S. Government Users Restricted Rights -- Use, duplication or disclosure restricted by GSA ADP ScheduleContract with IBM Corp.
  4. 4. Contents Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii Trademarks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix The team that wrote this redbook. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .x Notice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xii Become a published author . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xii Comments welcome. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiiiPart 1. Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Chapter 1. Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1.1 Data flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.1.1 The details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Chapter 2. Installation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 2.1 Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 2.1.1 Hardware and software prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 2.1.2 Check for record identifier conflicts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 2.1.3 Ensure that the HTTP Sever is installed and working. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 2.2 Performing the SMP/E installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 2.2.1 Installation reference table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 2.3 Customizing your Information Management installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 2.3.1 Update your session member . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 2.3.2 Update your BLX-SP parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 2.3.3 Update your IBM panels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 2.3.4 Load the sample records into your data session. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 2.3.5 Load the data model records into your DMRDB session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 2.3.6 Create static data views from the data model records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 2.3.7 Verify your Information Management customizations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 2.3.8 Set up e-mail notification. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 2.3.9 Configure your HTTP Server for Web Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 2.3.10 Update your BLQPARMS file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 2.3.11 Start the HTTP Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 2.3.12 Verify your Web Access installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 2.3.13 Generate HTML . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Chapter 3. Enabling your community . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 3.1 Assigning privilege class users and roles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28Part 2. Customization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Chapter 4. Implementing a Web solution using Web Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 4.1 Data model record overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 4.2 BLQPARMS definitions needed to support a record type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 4.3 Business logic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 4.3.1 Predisplay user exit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 4.3.2 Validation user exit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 4.3.3 Post-file update and create user exits. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 4.3.4 TSXs and TSPs used by business logic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39© Copyright IBM Corp. 2003 iii
  5. 5. 4.3.5 JavaScript in HTML. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 4.3.6 The home page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Chapter 5. Building a customized Web application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 5.1 Getting started. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 5.2 Data model and HTML considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 5.2.1 Date format and universal time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 5.2.2 Special processing s-words and table names. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 5.2.3 Audit information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 5.3 Integrating business logic into your application. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 5.3.1 REXX global variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 5.3.2 BLQUEXIT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Chapter 6. Generating user application HTML . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 6.1 The HTML generator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 6.2 Auto Build specifics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Chapter 7. Converting a 3270 application. . . ....... ...... ....... ...... ....... 71 7.1 Panel layouts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....... ...... ....... ...... ....... 73 7.1.1 Standard tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....... ...... ....... ...... ....... 75 7.2 Fields and groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....... ...... ....... ...... ....... 78 Chapter 8. Using existing privilege class records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Chapter 9. Using shadow s-words and data attribute records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 9.1 Shadow s-words in Web Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 9.2 Status shadow s-words and data attribute records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 9.2.1 The BLQPARMS file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 9.2.2 Status shadow s-words . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 9.2.3 Status shadow data attribute records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 9.2.4 Groups that include the status shadows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 9.3 Building a shadow scenario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 9.3.1 Several other variations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Chapter 10. Type-based HTML . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....... ...... ...... 101 10.1 Type-based HTML in Web Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....... ...... ...... 102 10.2 Understanding type-based HTML in the problem record . . ....... ...... ...... 105 10.3 Key points to remember . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....... ...... ...... 108 Chapter 11. Updating the style file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109Part 3. Administration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Chapter 12. Web administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 12.1 Tasks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 12.1.1 Navigation area tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 12.1.2 Field-initiated tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 12.2 Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119Part 4. Appendixes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 Appendix A. Business logic examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 BLQUXPRE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124 BLQUXVAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129 BLQUXFIL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 Using dates, date formats, and time zones in business logic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144iv IBM Tivoli Web Access for Information Management
  6. 6. Obtaining the current date and time in the user’s format and time zone. . . . . . . . . . . . 144 Converting a date in the user’s preferred format to internal format. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 Converting an internal date to a user-preferred external date format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146 Rules to remember when handling dates in business logic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147 Calculating a duration: An example using BLQUXVAL. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148Notification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149Appendix B. Hints and tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153Your changes to Web Access do not seem to take effect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154Listing groups and layouts in data views using BLGDVLAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154Changing Web page titles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155Changing the Tivoli logo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155Date formats. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156Using Java Desktop data view and data attribute records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157Sharing the Web server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158Data views and data attributes used in the attaching process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158 Add attachments to your data views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159General considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160Appendix C. Web Access configuration parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163Updating the configuration file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164 Debug option directive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164 Data set name directives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164 General control directives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165 User ID and privilege class directives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165 Directives that control the Information Management API . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166 UNIX System Services path and file reference directives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168 Server side include (SSI) directives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168 Business logic exit routine directives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169 User profile directives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170 Record type directives (used for all record types). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170 Generic database search directives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172 HTML generation directives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172 S-words to left-zero pad and create hyperlinks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174Related publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... ....... ...... ...... 175IBM Redbooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... ....... ...... ...... 175 Other resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... ....... ...... ...... 175How to get IBM Redbooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... ....... ...... ...... 176 IBM Redbooks collections. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... ....... ...... ...... 176Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177 Contents v
  7. 7. vi IBM Tivoli Web Access for Information Management
  8. 8. NoticesThis information was developed for products and services offered in the U.S.A.IBM may not offer the products, services, or features discussed in this document in other countries. Consultyour local IBM representative for information on the products and services currently available in your area.Any reference to an IBM product, program, or service is not intended to state or imply that only that IBMproduct, program, or service may be used. Any functionally equivalent product, program, or service that doesnot infringe any IBM intellectual property right may be used instead. However, it is the users responsibility toevaluate and verify the operation of any non-IBM product, program, or service.IBM may have patents or pending patent applications covering subject matter described in this document. Thefurnishing of this document does not give you any license to these patents. You can send license inquiries, inwriting, to:IBM Director of Licensing, IBM Corporation, North Castle Drive Armonk, NY 10504-1785 U.S.A.The following paragraph does not apply to the United Kingdom or any other country where such provisionsare inconsistent with local law : INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION PROVIDES THISPUBLICATION "AS IS" WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED,INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF NON-INFRINGEMENT,MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Some states do not allow disclaimer ofexpress or implied warranties in certain transactions, therefore, this statement may not apply to you.This information could include technical inaccuracies or typographical errors. Changes are periodically madeto the information herein; these changes will be incorporated in new editions of the publication. IBM may makeimprovements and/or changes in the product(s) and/or the program(s) described in this publication at any timewithout notice.Any references in this information to non-IBM Web sites are provided for convenience only and do not in anymanner serve as an endorsement of those Web sites. The materials at those Web sites are not part of thematerials for this IBM product and use of those Web sites is at your own risk.IBM may use or distribute any of the information you supply in any way it believes appropriate withoutincurring any obligation to you.Information concerning non-IBM products was obtained from the suppliers of those products, their publishedannouncements or other publicly available sources. IBM has not tested those products and cannot confirm theaccuracy of performance, compatibility or any other claims related to non-IBM products. Questions on thecapabilities of non-IBM products should be addressed to the suppliers of those products.This information contains examples of data and reports used in daily business operations. To illustrate themas completely as possible, the examples include the names of individuals, companies, brands, and products.All of these names are fictitious and any similarity to the names and addresses used by an actual businessenterprise is entirely coincidental.COPYRIGHT LICENSE:This information contains sample application programs in source language, which illustrates programmingtechniques on various operating platforms. You may copy, modify, and distribute these sample programs inany form without payment to IBM, for the purposes of developing, using, marketing or distributing applicationprograms conforming to the application programming interface for the operating platform for which the sampleprograms are written. These examples have not been thoroughly tested under all conditions. IBM, therefore,cannot guarantee or imply reliability, serviceability, or function of these programs. You may copy, modify, anddistribute these sample programs in any form without payment to IBM for the purposes of developing, using,marketing, or distributing application programs conforming to IBMs application programming interfaces.© Copyright IBM Corp. 2003. All rights reserved. vii
  9. 9. TrademarksThe following terms are trademarks of the International Business Machines Corporation in the United States,other countries, or both: ™ NetView® RACF® ^™ OS/390® Tivoli® eServer™ Planet Tivoli® z/OS™ IBM® Redbooks™ MVS™ Redbooks(logo) ™The following terms are trademarks of other companies:ActionMedia, LANDesk, MMX, Pentium and ProShare are trademarks of Intel Corporation in the UnitedStates, other countries, or both.Microsoft, Windows, Windows NT, and the Windows logo are trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in theUnited States, other countries, or both.Java and all Java-based trademarks and logos are trademarks or registered trademarks of SunMicrosystems, Inc. in the United States, other countries, or both.C-bus is a trademark of Corollary, Inc. in the United States, other countries, or both.UNIX is a registered trademark of The Open Group in the United States and other countries.SET, SET Secure Electronic Transaction, and the SET Logo are trademarks owned by SET Secure ElectronicTransaction LLC.Other company, product, and service names may be trademarks or service marks of others.viii IBM Tivoli Web Access for Information Management
  10. 10. Preface This new add-on product to the popular and powerful IBM® Tivoli® Information Management for z/OS™ is a drop-in Web solution for problem and change management. This product provides Web Access for the help desk, developer, manager, and end user. In addition to problems and changes, it can be used to build HTML Web browser interfaces for any record type, utilizing the power of the OS/390® server with a Web browser, while requiring only common industry standard skills. Users have access to their data from any machine with a Web browser. Would it be helpful to have: A graphical user interface that addresses usability and accessibility concerns? Instant access to an integrated database through the Web? A way to quickly identify what is down and what action is being done to correct it? A product that can easily be used to add additional record types to interface with problems or changes, or both, and to be able to do it with little to no programming? Value IBM Tivoli Web Access for Information Management1 provides the power of the Information Management for z/OS database together with flexibility and usability to the end user through the use of a Web browser. An intended benefit of this product is to reduce your training and development costs. With the ability to generate HTML using records in the database, providing Web access to your records is an administration task, rather than a programming task, helping to reduce the need for a programming skill set. This technology eliminates the need to code HTML pages from scratch. Sample business logic is provided, and additional logic can be easily added by writing simple REXX executables. The Web administrator can easily add new record types to accompany the problems and changes included. From an IT perspective, this product should eliminate the hours of 3270 training that were previously required. Benefits The following are some of the many benefits of Web Access: Provides out-of-the-box problem and change management through a Web browser Quick implementation and installation Reduced training and development costs Rapid time-to-value Graphical user interface functionality Fully customizable to fit business needs Security through Web server, RACF®, and Information Management for z/OS privilege classes Powerful search capabilities, allowing searches on virtually any data contained in the database Ongoing support File attachments for records 1 Hereafter, called simply Web Access.© Copyright IBM Corp. 2003 ix
  11. 11. Personal profile and saved settings Business logic Customization using a Web interface The Evolution of Tivoli Information Management Information Management was first introduced in 1981. It was originally a 3270 product used for problem and change management. Most customers were, and continue to be, Fortune 500 companies that have a strong need for a problem and change management application that has the power and flexibility to meet changing business requirements. There were several versions of the product over the past two decades. Each release introduced powerful and timely functionality to meet customer requirements. Most recently, the market requirements for a Web solution were communicated from Information Management for z/OS customers. Web Access meets the requirements of a Web solution. It provides a graphical user interface that is user-friendly and easily installed and customized. The fact that it is using an OS/390 or z/OS database is transparent to the users. The database can be accessed from any Web browser worldwide, thus opening the door for new user communities that would otherwise be unwilling or disinterested in a 3270 interface.The team that wrote this redbook This redbook was produced by a team of specialists from Tivoli Information Management Development and Support in Raleigh. Don Miller joined IBM in 1977 as a Hardware Customer Engineer (CE). He began his software career at the IBM Tampa Software Support Center in 1984, where his area of specialty was MVS™, including JES2, JES3, and SMP/E. In 1988, Don moved to Raleigh and joined the Information Management support team, where he undertook change team and development assignments. In 1995, he was assigned to the team developing and supporting the Web Connector interface to Information Management. He joined Tivoli Services in 1999, where he provided custom Web solutions to IBM customers using Information Management. Don was the Web subject matter expert and provided technical leadership for the Web Access project. Don rejoined the Information Management development team in July 2002. Mimi Michelet has been a Developer on the Information Management team since 1988. She has worked on a number of features in the product, including the BLX-SP, APIs, workstation clients, ODBC driver, and Desktop. She served as the project manager for the Web Access project and also helped develop the business logic implemented by the drop-in problem and change management solution. Michael Bacon joined IBM in 1998, where his first position was in Level 2 Information Management Support. In October of 2000, he became the Level 2 and Level 3 Support Manager, and later assumed development manager responsibilities for the product as well. He was Release Manager for Information Management for z/OS (which shipped in August 2001), as well as Web Access (which shipped in May 2002). Prior to joining IBM, Michael worked for NationsBank (now Bank of America), where he was a development team lead for the Information Management product. Maryann Goldman has worked on the Information Management team since 1991. During that time, she has done Level 2, Level 3, and development. Her favorite area of the product is the API, where her expertise is often sought out. She was Managing Editor of the Structured Word newsletter from 1996 to 1998. She has presented at many user groups and at Planet Tivoli®. Her major contribution to the Web Access project was understanding and piecing together the specifications for the HTML generator.x IBM Tivoli Web Access for Information Management
  12. 12. Rollin Hippler joined the Information Management development team in 1989, when hehelped design and implement the V5 BLX-SP. Since that time, he has worked onenhancements to increase database capacity, improve database integrity, and improveperformance. He has also worked on logical database partitioning and sysplex exploitation. Inaddition, Rollin has been a member of the service team providing resolutions for problemsrelated to the BLX-SP and database integrity. His primary responsibility for the Web Accessproject was infrastructure development.Pete Louis has worked on the Information Management team since 1991, doingdevelopment and support, as well as acting as system programmer for the teamsdevelopment/test systems. He generally concentrates on the “behind the scenes” andinfrastructure areas of the product (such as VSAM, parallel sysplex, multitasking,serialization, system services interfaces, and packaging). His primary contribution to the WebAccess project was the redesign of the Information Management API to support running in theHTTP Server multitasking environment.Tom Shultz has been a member of the Information Management team since 2000 and hasbeen working with the product since 1995. As part of the Information Management team, hehas done Level 2 support and development, specializing in PMF, REXX/TSX, and theDesktop. Tom helped code HTML for the Web Access project and provided assistance withdeveloping this redbook.Editorial staffThanks to the following people for their contributions to this project:Buck Stearns was managing editor. He is a Solution Development IT Specialist for IGSBusiness Development at the ITSO, Raleigh Center. Prior to joining ITSO, he worked twoyears as a mobile employee assigned to Tivoli Services and specializing in InformationManagement for z/OS and Tivoli Business Systems Manager. Before that, he logged over 25years in the banking and insurance industries, including the last 12 as problem, change, andconfiguration system administrator, architect, and programmer for Wachovia, now thenation’s fourth-largest financial holding company. Buck has spoken on configurationmanagement at the national Information Management users conference and is ITIL-certified.2He has extensive experience in IT management disciplines and holds undergraduate andgraduate degrees in English from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.Elizabeth Barnes of ITSO Austin served as executive editor.Linda Robinson of ITSO Raleigh was our graphics designer.ReviewersThanks to the following people for their contributions to this project:Julie BerghIBM Minneapolis, MNArt EisenhourIBM Gaithersburg, MD2 The Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL) is a set of books developed by the United Kingdoms Officeof Government Commerce (OGC). These books describe an integrated, process-based, best-practice framework formanaging IT services. To date, they are the only comprehensive, non-proprietary, publicly available guidance for ITservice management. ITIL was conceived in the late 1980s. It was initiated to improve IT Service Management in theUK central government and is relevant to all organizations, public or private sector, large or small, centralized ordistributed. Today, ITIL represents more than books alone. It has generated an entire industry that includes training,certification, consultancy, software tools, and trade association (itSMF). Preface xi
  13. 13. Lynn Kearney IBM Dallas, TX Greg Herbert IBM Austin, TX Sergio Juri IBM Raleigh, NC Cindy Purdy IBM Roanoke, VA Other contributors Special thanks to these two outstanding individuals (both now retired from IBM and sorely missed) for their long-term commitment to Information Management and more specifically to the processes and overall design of Web Access. Nancy Leavell Cary, NC Larry Schultz Markham, OntarioNotice This publication is intended to help Information Management administrators install and customize IBM Tivoli Web Access for Information Management. The information in this publication is not intended as the specification of any programming interfaces that are provided by IBM Tivoli Web Access for Information Management. See the PUBLICATIONS section of the IBM Programming Announcement for IBM Tivoli Web Access for Information Management for more information about what publications are considered to be product documentation.Become a published author Join us for a two- to six-week residency program! Help write an IBM Redbook dealing with specific products or solutions, while getting hands-on experience with leading-edge technologies. Youll team with IBM technical professionals, Business Partners and/or customers. Your efforts will help increase product acceptance and customer satisfaction. As a bonus, youll develop a network of contacts in IBM development labs, and increase your productivity and marketability. Find out more about the residency program, browse the residency index, and apply online at: ibm.com/redbooks/residencies.htmlxii IBM Tivoli Web Access for Information Management
  14. 14. Comments welcome Your comments are important to us! We want our Redbooks™ to be as helpful as possible. Send us your comments about this or other Redbooks in one of the following ways: Use the online Contact us review redbook form found at: ibm.com/redbooks Send your comments in an Internet note to: redbook@us.ibm.com Mail your comments to: IBM Corporation, International Technical Support Organization Dept. HZ8 Building 662 P.O. Box 12195 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2195 Preface xiii
  15. 15. xiv IBM Tivoli Web Access for Information Management
  16. 16. Part 1Part 1 Basics Part 1 contains a Web Access product overview and installation instructions.© Copyright IBM Corp. 2003 1
  17. 17. 2 IBM Tivoli Web Access for Information Management
  18. 18. 1 Chapter 1. Overview IBM Tivoli Web Access for Information Management is a sophisticated Web application based on the concepts described in the Tivoli Information Management for z/OS World Wide Web Interface Guide, Version 7.1, SC31-8757 (BLGW1E10). Web Access provides the ability to access dynamically defined data in the Information Management for z/OS database using a Web browser and includes a drop-in problem and change management Web solution. However, Web Access is more than just a complex Web application. It also provides functions that allow you to administer the application from the Web and provides support for customized applications. Web Access supplies the core set of REXX programs that manage the applications and drive access to your Information Management for z/OS database, whether you use the drop-in solution or your own application. If you need a customized application, tools are provided to build the HTML for your application, and exit points are also available for you to hook in your own business logic processes. Web Access consists of three primary pieces: 1. Application—Data model records, HTML, and business logic. These items uniquely define either the drop-in solution or your customized application. Data model records define the data that can be accessed, whereas the HTML defines the presentation of that data. 2. Infrastructure—Common REXX programs that support all applications and provide the HLAPI/REXX interface to the Information Management for z/OS database. This also includes functions that allow you to build the HTML for your applications and administer those applications from the Web. 3. Configuration—Application configuration information, including such things as API operating characteristics, the session-parameters member, business logic exit routine names, and the mapping of record types to HTML names.3 An IBM HTTP Server is also required to serve your Web Access application requests. 3 More information can be found in “Updating the configuration file” on page 164.© Copyright IBM Corp. 2003 3
  19. 19. 1.1 Data flow Your Web browser clients and your server machines communicate using TCP/IP protocol and must be part of the same IP network. This network could either be the Internet itself or a private network (intranet) that has no external connections or is connected to the Internet through a firewall. Web browser transactions are received by TCP/IP and queued for processing by the HTTP Server. The HTTP Server Go Webserver API (GWAPI) REXX interface is used to process Web browser transactions. The HTTP Server invokes the GWAPI REXX DLL, which establishes a REXX environment and invokes the REXX programs in the Web Access application. Requests for static HTML are served immediately by reading the information either from the HTML UNIX System Services directory (/usr/lpp/InfoMan/web/html) or from an internal cache. If access to the Information Management for z/OS database is required, the Web Access REXX programs use HLAPI/REXX calls to communicate with the database, formatting data they receive into HTML code that they pass back to the HTTP Server to be returned to the client.1.1.1 The details Figure 1-1 depicts the components of the Web Access application. httpd.conf TCP/IP Network HTTP Server for z/OS httpd.envvars SAF/LDAP HTML Database Directory z/OS Tables TSXs (PIDT and alias) Caches Core REXX Business HTML BLQWSWRT Logic User data BLQWRGET BLQUXPRE Session data Database, P-class BLQWRVAL (cached record) HLAPI env BLQUXFIL Data Model BLQWRUPD Records SRL BLQUXVAL BLQWRNEW BLQPARMs BLQWRUPD Session data (cached record) Home Page BLQWRINQ ... BLQHOME HLAPI/REXX Information Tivoli Web Access Management HLAPI/REXX Figure 1-1 Web Access application flow4 IBM Tivoli Web Access for Information Management
  20. 20. The HTTP Server for z/OS, Information Management for z/OS, and Web Access, along withyour existing TCP/IP network and workstations, work together to enable a user to work withrecords in your Information Management for z/OS database using a Web browser. Accessingthe Information Management for z/OS database in this way is done using a URL that caneither be typed into the browser’s address box or (more likely) hyperlinked from an existingHTML page that your users frequent. When a Web user addresses the HTTP Server forz/OS, it authenticates that user using either SAF (RACF) or Lightweight Directory AccessProtocol (LDAP) directories. If the user cannot be authenticated, processing stops and theuser is not allowed access to the Information Management for z/OS database. After the Webuser has been authenticated, the HTTP Server calls Web Access to process the request.Web Access performs the request and returns HTML to the HTTP Server, which then sendsthe HTML over your TCP/IP network to the Web browser to display to the user.To process requests, Web Access interacts with your Information Management for z/OSdatabase using the Information Management HLAPI/REXX interface and the HTTP Server forz/OS GWAPI, both of which are documented and supported general application programminginterfaces.4Following is a breakdown of the components and functionality of the HTTP Server, WebAccess, and Information Management for z/OS:HTTP Server for z/OSThe HTTP Server for z/OS does the following: Authenticates the Web user. Serves up static HTML directly from files stored in UNIX System Services directories in the Hierarchical File System (HFS). Sends requests for dynamic HTML (any record display, search, update, or create) to Web Access using the GWAPI.5Web AccessWeb Access provides the infrastructure required to display, update, create, or search forrecords stored in the Information Management for z/OS database. This infrastructure consistsof the following: Core REXX—Modules that are executed to process the requests, including: – BLQWSWRT: • Parses and translates the HTTP protocol request. • Calls Web Access routines to process the request. • Manages each Web user’s profile (user data cache). • Obtains and frees a HLAPI session for each request. • Manages the HLAPI environment cache. • Handles error recovery. – BLQWRGET: • Using HLAPI/REXX, reads a record from the Information Management for z/OS database. • Loads the record data into the user’s session data cache.64 No undocumented or unsupported interfaces are used by Web Access.5 A Common Gateway Interface (CGI)-like interface.6 A cached copy of the record data for use by other Web Access routines and business logic user exits. Chapter 1. Overview 5
  21. 21. • Inserts data from Information Management for z/OS into the HTML and uses the GWAPI to send the HTML back to the HTTP Server. • Calls the business logic predisplay_exit routine (which can modify data and redirect the HTML file used to display that data). • Manages privilege class cache and loads HTML cache. – BLQWRVAL: • Validates data entered by Web users updating or creating records in the Information Management for z/OS database. • If the data is valid, updates the session data for that user and calls the business logic validation_exit routine. – BLQWRUPD: • Uses updated session data to update records in the Information Management for z/OS database. • Updates user transaction history. • Calls the business logic postfile_update_exit routine. – BLQWRNEW: • Uses session data to create records in the Information Management for z/OS database. • Adds any record relationships.7 • Updates user transaction history. • Calls the business logic postfile_create_exit routine. – BLQWRINQ: • Validates and performs searches. • Sorts the search results. • Creates and manages the SRL cache (which is used when scrolling the SRL). Caches —Web Access uses in-memory caches to improve performance. These caches include: – HTML cache—BLQWRGET and BLQWRINQ processing reads HTML from a UNIX System Services directory in the HFS and saves it in the HTML cache. Some processing of the HTML is done before it is cached. For example, data attribute and validation records are read to populate drop-down lists in the HTML. – User data cache—Key fields from the Web user’s people record profile, including fields such as the user’s date format and time zone. – Privilege class (P-Class)—The authority codes for each privilege class are cached. – HLAPI environments—Each HLAPI session started is cached. These sessions are shared among all Web Access users. The maximum number of concurrent HLAPI sessions is defined by the max_sessions parameter in the Web Access BLQPARMS configuration file. – SRL cache—The record numbers returned by a search are cached. These cached record numbers are used to access the Information Management for z/OS database in order to populate the HTML page when a user scrolls through search results. This avoids reading all records returned by the search, because only enough records are read to populate each SRL page and additional records are read only as needed when the user scrolls through the results. 7 Parent/child6 IBM Tivoli Web Access for Information Management
  22. 22. – BLQPARMS cache—The parameters in the Web Access configuration file are cached and retrieved by the Core REXX programs as needed. These parameters are also available to business logic routines. – Session data cache—A cache of all the data for a specific record and user. If two users display the same record, there are two copies of the record in the session data cache (one for each user). Since the session data is used for all subsequent accesses by a user, data can be added or removed from the session data based on the user’s authority, role, or as business logic dictates. When a user creates or updates a record, only the session data is changed. When a user files the record, the session data is used to create or update the record in the Information Management for z/OS database. This allows the user to cancel the create/update any time prior to the actual file. Session data is also used to pass data to and from the Core REXX routines and the business logic user exits. Session data is destroyed when the user files or cancels the update or create request. This prevents duplicate creates or updates should the user click the browser’s Back button or refresh or reload the HTML. Business logic exit points—Though Web Access handles the mechanics for updating, creating, displaying, or searching for records, your business processes might require additional checking of data entered by your users. For example, although Web Access can ensure that the required fields Change Risk and Change Implementation Target Date are filled in and contain data in the proper format, it does not know that your process requires 21 days lead time for a medium-risk change. User exits allow you to code your own business logic to implement this rule. If a user enters a date that does not allow enough lead time, your business logic can display a message stating this, as well as flagging the field that the user should correct. Optionally, this logic might simply change the target implementation date to one that allows enough lead time. Web Access thus provides exits that allow you to implement your own business logic processing without having to touch the Core REXX. There are four business logic exit points: – Predisplay_exit—Runs before each HTML page is displayed. – Validation_exit—Runs when the user leaves an HTML page or files a record. – Postfile_create_exit—Runs after a record is created. – Postfile_update_exit—Runs after a record is updated. In addition, your business logic can control what information is displayed on the user’s Web Access home page (BLQHOME). Refer to Appendix A, “Business logic examples” on page 123 and 5.3, “Integrating business logic into your application” on page 47 for more information regarding business logic implementation.Information Management for z/OSComponents of Information Management include: The Information Management for z/OS database, which contains: – Your records – Web Access records, including: • Data model • Privilege class • Message • Reference TSX data sets, which contain: – Information Management for z/OS TSXs Chapter 1. Overview 7
  23. 23. – Your TSXs – Web Access TSXs Virtual Storage Access Method (VSAM) panel data sets, which contain: – Information Management for z/OS panels – Your panels – Web Access panels Report format table (RFT) data sets, which contain: – Information Management for z/OS program interface data tables (PIDTs) and program interface pattern tables (PIPTs) – Your PIDTs, PIPTs, and program interface alias tables (PALTs) – Web Access PIDTs, PIPTs, and PALTs8 IBM Tivoli Web Access for Information Management
  24. 24. 2 Chapter 2. Installation This chapter includes a checklist and detailed instructions about how to plan for and install the product. Note: Because the product is SMP/E installed, those steps are covered in the IBM Tivoli Web Access for Information Management Program Directory, GI10-3232.© Copyright IBM Corp. 2003 9
  25. 25. 2.1 Planning Before you begin installing Web Access: Verify that you have the hardware and software prerequisites. Check for record identifier conflicts (existing Information Management for z/OS customers only). Ensure that the HTTP Server is installed and working. After you perform these checks, you should: Perform the SMP/E installation of Web Access. Obtain the following guides: – Tivoli Information Management for z/OS Planning and Installation Guide and Reference, Version 7. 1, GC31-8751 (BLGP2E10) – Tivoli Information Management for z/OS Operation and Maintenance Reference, Version 7.1, SC31-8749 (BLGO1E10) Complete the installation reference table. Customize your Information Management for z/OS installation for Web Access. Configure your HTTP Server for Web Access. Verify your Web Access installation.2.1.1 Hardware and software prerequisites This section describes what you need to install to use Web Access. Hardware requirements Web Access can run in any hardware environment that supports the required software. Software requirements To use Web Access, you must have the following. For the host: OS/390 Version 2.8 (5647-A01) or later, or z/OS Version 1.1 (5694-A01) or later Tivoli Information Management for z/OS Version 7.1 (5697-SD9) or later, with the fixes for the APARs shown in Table 2-1 applied8 Table 2-1 Required PTFs PTFs APAR fixed UW87419 OW53441 UW92102 OW54084 UW92212 & UW92213 OW54215 UW92070 & UW92071 OW54576 UW92090 OW54626 UW92186 OW55367 UW92562 OW55489 8 Check the PSP bucket, UPGRADE INFO710 SUBSET HOYB120, for the latest maintenance.10 IBM Tivoli Web Access for Information Management
  26. 26. The fix for Web Access APAR OW54661 (PTF UW92115) The fix for Web Access APAR OW55409 (PTF UW93644) For the workstation: Netscape Version 6.0 or later, or Microsoft Internet Explorer Version 5.5 or later2.1.2 Check for record identifier conflicts Note: Existing Information Management for z/OS customers only. If you have been using Information Management for z/OS, it is possible that records could have been created in your database or databases using record identifiers that Web Access requires. You need to resolve these conflicts before you install Web Access. Using the COPY command and giving the record new identifiers should be enough in most cases. The records shipped by Web Access start with the BLQ prefix. You can also enter the following freeform search on the command line to verify that you do not have records that start with BLQ that might be a conflict: SEARCH RNID/BLQ. Hopefully, you get the following message: BLG19214I No records satisfy the specified search criteria. If the search does not locate any records, you should not experience any record name conflicts and you can continue. If the search does locate records that start with BLQ, you should note these record IDs. If you do not have a copy of these records, use the COPY command and create copies of these records (you will have to use new record IDs). Then continue with the installation. After you have loaded all of the data model records, you should display the records you noted and see if they were changed. If they were changed (replaced) by the Web Access install, you will need to resolve the conflicts.2.1.3 Ensure that the HTTP Sever is installed and working When customizing the installation of Web Access, the HTTP Web server configuration is updated. Therefore, you should verify that the HTTP Server is installed and active by entering the following URL in your browser address bar: httpd://your_host_name_or_ip_address:your_port_number/ Note: Here, you should substitute your actual host name (or IP address) and port number. A port number (:your_port_number) is needed only if you are using a port other than 80 for your Web server. After entering this URL in your browser address window, you should receive an IBM HTTP Server Web page. If not, you will need to stop the Web Access install process and determine why this page did not successfully load. For more information about setting up the IBM HTTP Server for OS/390, see IBM HTTP Server Planning, Installing, and Using, SC31-8690 for Version 5.2, or SC34-4826 for Version 5.3. Chapter 2. Installation 11
  27. 27. 2.2 Performing the SMP/E installation Refer to the IBM Tivoli Web Access for Information Management Program Directory, GI10-3232, that came with your Web Access tape. It is recommended that you use the same DDDEFs for Web Access that you did for Information Management for z/OS so that the common data sets are shared.2.2.1 Installation reference table When you install Web Access, you will need to reference and change various files and data sets. To speed Web Access installation, please take the time to fill in the information in Table 2-2. Make a copy of the table for your test and production systems. Keep it handy when you are customizing the installation of Web Access. Refer to this table when you need to locate one of the files or data sets needed during the install.Table 2-2 Installation reference table Name Location and description BLX-PROC MVS PROCLIB:_______________________________________________________________ MVS procedure used to run the BLX service provider (BLX-SP).a BLXPRM MVS PDS name and member:____________________________________________________ Parameters used to control the BLX-SP. The BLXPRM DD in BLX-PROC points to the PDS. The BLX-SP parameters member is typically named BLX100.a SBLMMOD1 MVS PDS name: ______________________________________________________________ Contains the load modules and session members used by Information Management for z/OS.b You may use multiple load libraries, so list them all. SBLMSAMP MVS PDS name: ______________________________________________________________ Contains the sample JCL members for Information Management for z/OS and Web Access. SBLMPNLS MVS PDS name: ______________________________________________________________ Contains the panels needed by Information Management for z/OS and Web Access.c SBLMRCDS MVS PDS name: ______________________________________________________________ Contains data model records used by Information Management for z/OS and Web Access. SBLMTSX MVS PDS name: ______________________________________________________________ Contains the TSX executables used by Information Management for z/OS and Web Access. SBLMFMT MVS PDS name: ______________________________________________________________ Contains the report format tables, program data tables (PIDTs), and alias tables for Information Management for z/OS and Web Access. SBLMDICT MVS PDS name: ______________________________________________________________ Contains the dictionary for Information Management for z/OS and Web Access. WEBPROC MVS PROCLIB:_______________________________________________________________ MVS procedure used to run the HTTP Server. The procedure was created during the installation of the HTTP Server. See IBM HTTP Server Planning, Installing, and Using, SC31-8690 for Version 5.2, or SC34-4826 for Version 5.3.12 IBM Tivoli Web Access for Information Management
  28. 28. Name Location and descriptionBLG-Source MVS PDS name: ______________________________________________________________ Contains the source code used to create one or more session parameter members. It is often used to store the JCL used to run the Information Management for z/OS utilities and create the Information Management for z/OS database. You might want to use this PDS for the JCL employed to run the Information Management for z/OS utilities for Web Access. Keeping the Information Management for z/OS and Web Access JCL in the same PDS is recommended. Session members are named BLGSESnn.d Session member you want Web Access to use when Web users create, update, and so on, problem and change records: ___________ (data session) Session member used to access your data model record database e as database 5 (read/write mode) if different than your data session: ___________ (DMRDB session) Session member used when you use the Information Management Panel Modification Facility (PMF) if different than your data session: ___________ (PMF session) Browse the session-parameters member source for the data session and locate the following data set names coded on the BLGCLDSN macros: The IBM Panels data set: _______________________________ The dictionary data: _______________________________RFTDD MVS PDS name: ______________________________________________________________ Data set that contains your modified RFTs, PIDTs, and alias tables. If you do not currently have one, then allocate one. Model it after SBLMFMT.TSX MVS PDS name: ______________________________________________________________ Data set that contains your modified TSXs. If you do not currently have one, allocate one. Model it after SBLMTSX.httpd.envvars Path and file name:____________________________________________________________ The HTTP Server environment variables file. The default environment variables file is /etc/httpd.envvars. An environment variables file can be specified in your WEBPROC used to run your HTTP Server. The file is pointed to by _CEE_ENFILE ENVAR. The _CEE_ENFILE file can specify a path or a DD name. Examples: //IMWPROC PROC ICSPARM=-r /etc/httpd.conf, // LEPARM=ENVAR(“_CEE_ENVFILE=/etc/httpd.envvars “) //WEBSRV EXEC PGM=IMWHTTPD,REGION=0K, // PARM=(&LEPARM/&ICSPARM),TIME=NOLIMIT or //IMWPROC PROC ICSPARM=-r /etc/httpd.conf, // LEPARM=ENVAR(“_CEE_ENVFILE=DD:WENV “) //WEBSRV EXEC PGM=IMWHTTPD,REGION=0K, // PARM=(&LEPARM/&ICSPARM),TIME=NOLIMIT //WENV DD PATH=/etc/httpd.envvars, // PATHOPTS=(ORDONLY) Chapter 2. Installation 13
  29. 29. Name Location and description httpd.conf Path and file name:____________________________________________________________ Configuration file used by the HTTP Server. The HTTP Server configuration file is specified in the -r parameter on the ICSPARM parameter in your HTTP Server startup procedure. If the -r parameter is not specified on ICSPARM, or if ICSPARM is not specified, the configuration file defaults to /etc/httpd.conf. If you specify the -r parameter, but do not specify a fully qualified file name, the path for the configuration file defaults to the /etc directory. BLQPARMS Path and file name:____________________________________________________________ Web Access configuration file. Loaded into an HFS directory during the SMP/E install. Pointed to by the INFOMANWEBTOOLKITCONF= keyword in the httpd.envvars file. The Web Access-supplied file is BLQPARMS and is installed in the /usr/lpp/InfoMan/web/samples directory. HTML Path:_______________________________________________________________________ Contains the HTML used by Web Access. Contains subdirectories js/, css/, and images/. The Web Access installation directory is /usr/lpp/InfoMan/web/html. REXX Path:_______________________________________________________________________ Contains the REXX programs used by Web Access. The Web Access installation directory is /usr/lpp/InfoMan/web/rexx. a. See Chapter 10, “Setting Up Your BLX-SP,” in Tivoli Information Management for z/OS Planning and Installation Guide and Reference, Version 7.1, GC31-8751 (BLGP2E10). b. Typically, there is one load library that contains the Information Management for z/OS code and one or more load libraries that contain your code (such as program exits and session members). Include all the PDSs here and use them whenever you are instructed to add SBLMMOD1 to the //STEPLIB, for example. Browse your BLX-PROC for a STEPLIB. If it uses a STEPLIB, note each data set. If it does not have a STEPLIB, then SBLMMOD1 is in LINKLIST. c. It is possible that two different PDSs are used for the Information Management for z/OS and Web Access parts during the SMP/E install. To see if a PDS is shared (recommended) by the two products, browse the PDS. Web Access members begin with the letters BLQ, and Information Management for z/OS members with BLG and BLM (also BLH and BTN, but BLG and BLM are the key prefixes). If you find BLQ members along with BLG or BLM mem- bers, or both, in a PDS, the two products share the PDS. If the PDS does not contain both member prefixes, contact your local SMP/E expert to obtain the PDS names used. d. See Appendix D, ”Defining Tivoli Information Management for z/OS Session-Parameters Members,” in Tivoli In- formation Management for z/OS Planning and Installation Guide and Reference, Version 7.1, GC31-8751 (BLGP2E10). e. You can put your data records (problem, change, and so on) and your data model records into the same data- base. It is also possible to have your data model records in databases different from your data records. Putting all the records into one database simplifies the installation of Web Access. Using different databases can make it eas- ier to move your Web Access application from your development/test system to your production system. If your data model records are not in the same database as your data records, your data session needs to refer to the MOD- ELDB parameter (also see Footnote d).2.3 Customizing your Information Management installation The following steps assume that Information Management for z/OS Version 7.1 has been fully installed using the steps in Chapter 1 of the Tivoli Information Management for z/OS Planning and Installation Guide and Reference, Version 7.1, GC31-8751 (BLGP2E10). Many of the steps here reference back to this guide and to the Tivoli Information Management for z/OS Operation and Maintenance Reference, Version 7.1, SC31-8749 (BLGO1E10). You should also have available Table 2-2 on page 12 that you completed at the beginning of this chapter.14 IBM Tivoli Web Access for Information Management
  30. 30. 2.3.1 Update your session member Web Access requires that you use TEXTAUDIT=NO (the default) on the BLGPARMS macro of your session. See BLG-Source in Table 2-2 on page 12 for the location of your session member source. If you are using TEXTAUDIT=YES, change it to NO and reassemble and relink your session member. Also see See Appendix D, “Defining Tivoli Information Management for z/OS Session-Parameters Members,” in Tivoli Information Management for z/OS Planning and Installation Guide and Reference, Version 7.1, GC31-8751 (BLGP2E10).2.3.2 Update your BLX-SP parameters Web Access requires that APISECURITY=OFF be used in your BLXPRM member. See BLXPRM in Table 2-2 on page 12 for the location of the BLX-SP parameters member. Also see Appendix E, “Defining BLX-SP Parameters Members,” in Tivoli Information Management for z/OS Planning and Installation Guide and Reference, Version 7.1, GC31-8751 (BLGP2E10). You should specify a value for APICHKOUTLIMIT in your BLXPRM member. A 30-minute (APICHKOUTLIMIT=00300000) or 60-minute (APICHKOUTLIMIT=00600000) value is recommended. You should also specify DBCS=NO in your BLXPRM member. If any values in the BLXPRM member were changed, stop and restart the BLX-PROC.2.3.3 Update your IBM panels You must edit the JCL executing the Information Management for z/OS utilities that load the panels as described in the following steps: 1. Copy the sample JCL BLGUT6J from SBLMSAMP to a PDS in which you can edit and save your changes. Your might want to call this new JCL member BLQUT6, since it is used to load the Web Access panels into the IBM panels data set. Do not delete this PDS, because you will use this JCL in the future when you install maintenance for Web Access. 2. Edit your copy, following the comments in the JCL: a. Change the job card information. b. Update //STEPLIB to point to SBLMMOD1. c. Change DSN= on //BLGPDS DD to the SBLMPNLS data set. d. Change DSN= on //BLGPNLS DD to the IBM panels data set associated with your BLG-Source data session. 3. Submit the JCL and examine the output. There should be no error messages (it should complete with CC=0).2.3.4 Load the sample records into your data session Web Access ships several types of records, including privilege class records (for example, BLQALST), reference records (for example, BLQWALST), and message records (for example, BLQMAPPR) that must be loaded into your data session database. 1. Using TSO/ISPF, log on to Information Management for z/OS using your data session.9 2. If you are not in the Master privilege class, change to that class now. 9 See BLG-Source in Table 2-2 on page 12 for the name of your data session. Chapter 2. Installation 15
  31. 31. 3. At the Information Management for z/OS command line, enter the following command to load the records: RUN BLHRCDSL your_sblmrcds_pds BLQL5WEB REPLACE Replace your_sblmrcds_pds with your SBLMRCDS data set. The records should unflatten without errors.2.3.5 Load the data model records into your DMRDB session Web Access ships data view, data attribute, and data validation records that must be loaded into your data model record database. To do so, the data model record database (DMRDB) must be accessed as database 5 in the session member, since that is the read/write database.10 The DMRDB session may be the same as your data session. If you use the same session for data and data model records, use the data session in the following steps instead of the DMRDB session: 1. Using TSO/ISPF, log on to Information Management for z/OS using your DMRDB session. 2. If you are not in the Master privilege class, change to that class now. 3. At the Information Management for z/OS command line, enter the following command to load the data model records: RUN BLHRCDSL your_sblmrcds_pds BLQL4WEB REPLACE Replace your_sblmrcds_pds with your SBLMRCDS data set. The Web Access data model records should unflatten into your data model database without errors. 4. Web Access also requires data model records that ship with Information Management. At the Information Management for z/OS command line, enter the following command to load the Information Management records into your data model database: RUN BLHRCDSL your_sblmrcds_pds BLHLRBAS REPLACE Replace your_sblmrcds_pds with your SBLMRCDS data set. The Information Management data model records should unflatten into your data model database without errors.2.3.6 Create static data views from the data model records For best performance, you should create static data views from the data model records, as follows: 1. If you do not have a user RFTDD data set, you should allocate one now. 2. Copy the BLQUT18J sample JCL from SBLMSAMP to a PDS in which you can edit and save your changes. 3. Edit your copy, and following the comments in the JCL: a. Change the job card information. b. Update //STEPLIB to point to SBLMMOD1. c. Change the parameters on the EXEC card to match your Information Management for z/OS installation: i. CLASS—Typically MASTER ii. APPLID —Your user ID iii. SESS—The last two digits of your DMRDB session name. d. Change DSN= on //BLGRFT DD to the RFTDD data set. 10 See BLG-Source in Table 2-2 on page 12 for the name of your DMRDB session.16 IBM Tivoli Web Access for Information Management
  32. 32. 4. Submit the JCL and examine the output. There should be no error messages (it should complete with CC=0).112.3.7 Verify your Information Management customizations Using your data session, log on to Information Management for z/OS in TSO/ISPF and do the following: 1. Switch to the Master privilege class. 2. Enter the command UPDATE R rnid, where rnid is the record ID of your Master privilege class record.12 3. Select option 1 (Class Description Entry). 4. Enter Administrator into field 10 (Privilege Class Role). If you do not have a matching field 10, either you failed to install the Information Management for z/OS PTF to support Web Access for z/OS, or you have a customized version of panel BLG0J100. Use your PMF session to locate the BLG0J100 panel for use with Web Access and either add your modification to that panel or add the control information for field 10 to your customized BLG0J100. 5. If Administrator is accepted for the role, you have successfully loaded the panels and data model records for Web Access. If Administrator is not accepted, review the steps in 2.2, “Performing the SMP/E installation” on page 12. 6. File the record. 7. Now add your user ID to the following privilege classes: – BLQADMN – BLQALST – BLQSUPP – BLQMGT – BLQUSER If these classes are not found, review the steps you performed in 2.3.4, “Load the sample records into your data session” on page 15.2.3.8 Set up e-mail notification Web Access uses the Information Management for z/OS notification feature to send e-mail messages. You can disable Web Access notification, but as shipped, it is enabled. If you have not already set up e-mail notification for your Information Management installation, you must do so now. Copy the Information Management TSX BLGTNMAN (which is located in your Information Management SBLMTSX data set) to the TSX data set that contains your customized TSXs. Update BLGTNMAN with your SMTP server host name (or IP address) and port number. Review the other SMTP parameters in this TSX and update them as appropriate. You can find more details in “Defining TCP/IP SMTP Server Information (Editing the BLGTNMAN TSX)” in Tivoli Information Management for z/OS Program Administration Guide and Reference, Version 7.1, SC31-8753 (BLGS1E10). 11 Note: When you begin to customize data views for your own use, you will need to run this JCL. You can add or remove the data view names to //SYSIN DD * to control which data views will have static data views created. 12 Typically, the record ID is MASTER. Chapter 2. Installation 17
  33. 33. Web Access also supplies a set of message model records, which are listed in Appendix A, “Business logic examples” on page 123. At a minimum, you should update message records BLQMAPPR and BLQMRSET and replace yourhostname and yourport in the URL in the message text to refer to your Web Access host and port: http://yourhostname:yourport/IMWA/BLQWRGET.REXX?html_view=BLQ0C209.html&rnid_symbol=!S0CCF All of the message records include a From field for the send-from address that appears in your e-mail messages. As shipped, the records are set to a default of IMWA@hostname.com. You may want to modify the message records to specify a From address as appropriate for your installation. To update the message records, log on to Information Management. If you are not already in the Master privilege class, switch to that class. Use the UPDATE command or any method you are accustomed to using to update the message records.2.3.9 Configure your HTTP Server for Web Access Perform the following steps to ensure that the HTTP Server is set up properly for the Web Access application: 1. Verify the following information before proceeding with the HTTP Server setup for Web Access: a. Tivoli Information Management for z/OS v7.1 or later is installed and working. b. Perform the SMP/E install of Web Access. c. Verify that the Web Access components have been installed on the host system by making sure that you have completed the installation reference table in 2.2.1, “Installation reference table” on page 12. In that table, you should have identified the HTTP Server file names, data sets, and so forth to which you will be making changes for Web Access. d. If you have not already done so, copy BLQWAPII and BLQWAPIT from the Information Management SBLMREXX data set to your Web Access REXX directory (typically /usr/lpp/InfoMan/web/rexx). e. IBM HTTP Server for OS/390 Version 5.2 or later is installed and working in OS/390 UNIX System Services. Before making any changes to the HTTP Server, you should verify that the server is installed and active by entering the following URL in your browser address window: httpd://your_host_name_or_ip_address:your_port_number/ Note: Here you should substitute your actual host name (or IP address) and port number. A port number (:your_port_number) is needed only if you are using a port other than 80 for your Web server. After entering this URL in your browser address window, you should receive an IBM HTTP Server Web page. If not, you will need to stop the Web Access install process and determine why this page did not successfully load. For more information about setting up the IBM HTTP Server for OS/390, refer to IBM HTTP Server Planning, Installing, and Using, SC31-8690 for Version 5.2, or SC34-4826 for Version 5.3.18 IBM Tivoli Web Access for Information Management
  34. 34. 2. Have your RACF administrator perform the following RACF functions: a. Define the IMWAUSER surrogate user ID: Create this surrogate for users accessing the Web server started task for Web Access. This surrogate will be used in UNIX to serve requests made by Web Access users. Determine the default group to which the user should be defined (or add a new group). The UID does not need to be 0. The default group must have a GID. At a TSO command prompt, type the following information: ADDUSER IMWAUSER - DFLTGRP(EXTERNAL)OMVS(UID(xxx)Home(/)PROG(/bin/sh)) - NOPASSWORD OWNER(________) If the default group does not have a GID, perform the following: ALTGROUP EXTERNAL OMVS(GID(xxx)) b. If this is a new started task for the Web Access Web server, define the started task to RACF. The following assumes that the group STCGRP already exists: ADDUSER WEBSRV DLFTGRP(stcgrp) OWNER(_____) NOPASSWORD Define the started task to the RACF STARTED class. The following assumes that the group STCGRP already exists. The GROUP here needs to be the same as the DFLTGRP on the ADDUSER in the previous step: RDEFINE STARTED WEBSRV.* OWNER(stcgrp) STDATA(USER(WEBSRV) GROUP(stcgrp) TRUSTED(NO)) SETR CLASSACT(STARTED) RACLIST(STARTED) Or SETR REFRESH RACLIST(STARTED) c. Permit the Web Access USER access to the Web server, where WEBSRV is the user ID of the started task: RDEFINE SURROGAT BPX.SRV.IMWAUSER UACC(NONE) OWNER(_______) PERMIT BPX.SRV.IMWAUSER CLASS(SURROGAT)ID(WEBSRV)ACCESS(READ) SETR CLASSACT(SURROGAT) RACLIST(SURROGAT) Or SETR RACLIST(SURROGAT)REFRESH Note: These constitute the basic tasks required to start a Web server started task. There are other considerations in starting a new Web server started task. Refer to IBM HTTP Server Planning, Installing, and Using, SC31-8690 for Version 5.2, or SC34-4826 for Version 5.3, for a complete list. d. If the JESSPOOL RACF class is active, have the RACF security administrator permit access to the WEBSRV spool data for the appropriate people. e. If you are running with RACF Program Control support activated, ensure that Program Control is turned on for the SBLMMOD1 data set: RALTER PROGRAM RADDMEM(your_SBLMMOD1_dataset_name//NOPADCHK) UACC(READ) SETROPTS WHEN(PROGRAM)REFRESH Note: It is assumed that WEBSRV is the user ID assigned to your Web server started task. This user ID appears in the RACF commands and was defined or decided upon when you installed the HTTP Server. Chapter 2. Installation 19
  35. 35. f. Web administrator and UNIX access bits: When the SMP/E install was performed, and the files were placed into the HFS directory, the file owner was probably set to UID 0 and the access mode bits were set to 755, which are the typical SMP/E default values. The Web Access administrator will be allowed to edit and build HTML by Web Access.13 However, unless this user ID is also a super user, it will not be able to update the files in the HTML directory. To avoid the need to be a super user in order to update these files, do one of the following: i. Have the file owner set the access mode to 775. This will allow users with the GID to update the files. It may be necessary to use the chgid command to set the group to a group that the Web administrator is permitted to use. ii. Have the file owner change the owner to your user ID. Then, you can use the chggid command to permit group access to the files. iii. Create a directory of your own. Copy all of the files and subdirectories in /html to your directory. Create the softlink for IMWX00.so in your directory and update the Pass and Service directives in the httpd.conf file to point to your directory. Also update html_path in the BLQPARMS file to point to your directory. You may want to have your RACF administrator set up a group for Web Access administrators. 3. Update the WEBPROC and add a //STEPLIB pointing to SBLMMOD1 if SBLMMOD1 is not in LINKLIST. 4. Create an external link to the GWAPI REXX DLL, IMWX00. From an OS/390 UNIX System Services session, enter the following: ln -e IMWX00 /usr/lpp/InfoMan/web/html/IMWX00.so 5. Modify your HTTP Server configuration file (httpd.conf) to include the following Web Access directives: Protection IMWAmaster { AuthType Basic Mask All PasswdFile %%SAF%% ServerId Restricted UserID %%CLIENT%% } Protection IMWA { AuthType Basic Mask All PasswdFile %%SAF%% ServerId Restricted UserID IMWAUSER } Protect /IMWA/* IMWA Protect /IMWAmaster/* IMWAmaster Note: For this Web Access Protection directive, the %%CLIENT%% can or should be the surrogate ID. If you decide to use %%CLIENT%%, your users must have an OE segment defined for each user ID. If you use the surrogate ID, though your users will not need an OE segment, the surrogate ID will. 13A Web Access administrator is any user ID that is defined in the privilege class record identified by the admin_class parameter in your BLQPARMS configuration file. Typically, the privilege class record is BLQADMN.20 IBM Tivoli Web Access for Information Management

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