Deployment guide series ibm tivoli usage and accounting manager v7.1 sg247569

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Deployment guide series ibm tivoli usage and accounting manager v7.1 sg247569

  1. 1. Front coverDeployment Guide Series:IBM Tivoli Usage andAccounting Manager V7.1Financial management solution forIT-related servicesExtensive deployment anddemonstration examplesPlanning and servicesinformation Budi Darmawan Jörn Siglen Lennart Lundgren Roy Catterallibm.com/redbooks
  2. 2. International Technical Support OrganizationDeployment Guide Series: IBM Tivoli Usage andAccounting Manager V7.1February 2008 SG24-7569-00
  3. 3. Note: Before using this information and the product it supports, read the information in “Notices” on page vii.First Edition (February 2008)This edition applies to Version 7, Release 1, Modification 0 of IBM Tivoli Usage and AccountingManager (product number 5724-O33).© Copyright International Business Machines Corporation 2008. All rights reserved.Note to U.S. Government Users Restricted Rights -- Use, duplication or disclosure restricted by GSA ADPSchedule Contract with IBM Corp.
  4. 4. Contents Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii Trademarks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix The team that wrote this book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix Become a published author . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . x Comments welcome. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiPart 1. Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Chapter 1. Solution introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1.1 ITIL financial management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.2 Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.3 Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager value proposition . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 1.4 Product architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 1.4.1 Generic processing flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 1.4.2 The Common Source Resource format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Chapter 2. Solution environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 2.1 Hardware prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 2.2 Software prerequisites. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 2.2.1 Supported operating systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 2.2.2 Supported databases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 2.3 Sizing considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 2.3.1 Data elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 2.3.2 Growth factors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 2.3.3 Sample growth estimation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 2.4 Typical deployment environment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 2.4.1 Small, proof of concept, or demonstration environment . . . . . . . . . . 27 2.4.2 Medium scale production environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 2.4.3 Large scale production environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Chapter 3. Project planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 3.1 Required skills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 3.2 Solution description and assumptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 3.3 Task breakdown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 3.3.1 Project kick-off. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 3.3.2 Environment preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 3.3.3 Database setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34© Copyright IBM Corp. 2008. All rights reserved. iii
  5. 5. 3.3.4 Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager server installation . . . . . . . . 34 3.3.5 Data collection pack setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 3.3.6 Customizing the product . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 3.3.7 Demonstrating the solution and skill transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35Part 2. Deployment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Chapter 4. Installation and configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 4.1 Installation overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 4.2 Installing DB2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 4.3 Installing server prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 4.3.1 Configuring Microsoft Internet Information Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 4.3.2 Install the Microsoft Installer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 4.3.3 Install Microsoft .NET Framework 2.0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 4.3.4 Install Microsoft SQL Server Report Viewer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 4.4 Installing server components. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 4.5 Installing Enterprise Collector Pack. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 4.6 Initial configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 4.6.1 Defining the JDBC driver. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 4.6.2 Defining data sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 4.6.3 Initializing the database. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 4.6.4 Other configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 4.7 Installing Windows Process Collector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 4.7.1 Manual installation process. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 4.7.2 Deploying with a job . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Chapter 5. Usage demonstration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 5.1 Demonstration overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 5.2 Defining accounting resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 5.2.1 Working with the account code structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 5.2.2 Setting up clients. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 5.2.3 Rate table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 5.3 Running Windows collection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 5.3.1 Verifying the Windows process data collector installation. . . . . . . . 103 5.3.2 Windows process data files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 5.4 Loading Windows process data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 5.4.1 The data collection process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 5.4.2 Account code mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 5.4.3 Running the collection job . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111iv Deployment Guide Series: IBM Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager V7.1
  6. 6. 5.5 Generating Windows reports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 5.6 Additional demonstration scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 5.7 Financial Modeler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 Chapter 6. Troubleshooting hints and tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 6.1 General logging and tracing options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 6.2 Installation and configuration details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128 6.3 Integrated Solution Console debugging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128 6.4 Job Runner debugging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130 6.5 Quick finder for trace and log information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132Part 3. Appendixes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 Appendix A. Sample listing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 Sample Windows load job . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 Sample Windows process collector job . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140 Appendix B. Additional material . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 Locating the Web material . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 Using the Web material . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146 System requirements for downloading the Web material . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146 How to use the Web material . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146 Abbreviations and acronyms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147 Related publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149 IBM Redbooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149 Other publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149 Online resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149 How to get Redbooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150 Help from IBM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150 Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151 Contents v
  7. 7. vi Deployment Guide Series: IBM Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager V7.1
  8. 8. NoticesThis information was developed for products and services offered in the U.S.A.IBM may not offer the products, services, or features discussed in this document in other countries. Consultyour local IBM representative for information on the products and services currently available in your area.Any reference to an IBM product, program, or service is not intended to state or imply that only that IBMproduct, program, or service may be used. Any functionally equivalent product, program, or service thatdoes not infringe any IBM intellectual property right may be used instead. However, it is the usersresponsibility to evaluate and verify the operation of any non-IBM product, program, or service.IBM may have patents or pending patent applications covering subject matter described in this document.The furnishing of this document does not give you any license to these patents. You can send licenseinquiries, in writing, to:IBM Director of Licensing, IBM Corporation, North Castle Drive, Armonk, NY 10504-1785 U.S.A.The following paragraph does not apply to the United Kingdom or any other country where suchprovisions are inconsistent with local law: INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATIONPROVIDES THIS PUBLICATION "AS IS" WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS ORIMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF NON-INFRINGEMENT,MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Some states do not allow disclaimerof express or implied warranties in certain transactions, therefore, this statement may not apply to you.This information could include technical inaccuracies or typographical errors. Changes are periodically madeto the information herein; these changes will be incorporated in new editions of the publication. IBM maymake improvements and/or changes in the product(s) and/or the program(s) described in this publication atany time without notice.Any references in this information to non-IBM Web sites are provided for convenience only and do not in anymanner serve as an endorsement of those Web sites. The materials at those Web sites are not part of thematerials for this IBM product and use of those Web sites is at your own risk.IBM may use or distribute any of the information you supply in any way it believes appropriate withoutincurring any obligation to you.Information concerning non-IBM products was obtained from the suppliers of those products, their publishedannouncements or other publicly available sources. IBM has not tested those products and cannot confirmthe accuracy of performance, compatibility or any other claims related to non-IBM products. Questions onthe capabilities of non-IBM products should be addressed to the suppliers of those products.This information contains examples of data and reports used in daily business operations. To illustrate themas completely as possible, the examples include the names of individuals, companies, brands, and products.All of these names are fictitious and any similarity to the names and addresses used by an actual businessenterprise is entirely coincidental.COPYRIGHT LICENSE:This information contains sample application programs in source language, which illustrate programmingtechniques on various operating platforms. You may copy, modify, and distribute these sample programs inany form without payment to IBM, for the purposes of developing, using, marketing or distributing applicationprograms conforming to the application programming interface for the operating platform for which thesample programs are written. These examples have not been thoroughly tested under all conditions. IBM,therefore, cannot guarantee or imply reliability, serviceability, or function of these programs.© Copyright IBM Corp. 2008. All rights reserved. vii
  9. 9. TrademarksThe following terms are trademarks of the International Business Machines Corporation in the United States,other countries, or both: AIX® Notes® System z™ DB2 Universal Database™ PowerPC® Tivoli® DB2® pSeries® TotalStorage® IBM® Redbooks® WebSphere® i5/OS® Redbooks (logo) ® z/OS® Lotus Notes® System i™ z/VM® Lotus® System p™The following terms are trademarks of other companies:SAP, and SAP logos are trademarks or registered trademarks of SAP AG in Germany and in several othercountries.Oracle, JD Edwards, PeopleSoft, Siebel, and TopLink are registered trademarks of Oracle Corporationand/or its affiliates.IT Infrastructure Library, IT Infrastructure Library is a registered trademark of the Central Computer andTelecommunications Agency which is now part of the Office of Government Commerce.ITIL is a registered trademark, and a registered community trademark of the Office of GovernmentCommerce, and is registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.Java, JDBC, JVM, Solaris, Sun, and all Java-based trademarks are trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc. inthe United States, other countries, or both.Microsoft, SQL Server, Visual C++, Windows Server, Windows Vista, Windows, and the Windows logo aretrademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States, other countries, or both.Itanium, Intel logo, Intel Inside logo, and Intel Centrino logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of IntelCorporation or its subsidiaries in the United States, other countries, or both.UNIX is a registered trademark of The Open Group in the United States and other countries.Linux is a trademark of Linus Torvalds in the United States, other countries, or both.Other company, product, or service names may be trademarks or service marks of others.viii Deployment Guide Series: IBM Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager V7.1
  10. 10. Preface This book is part of the Deployment Guide series. It provides a step-by-step guide for deploying Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager V7.1. It is intended to help an IBM® or business partner service person to plan and perform the deployment of the product. The discussion of Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager includes an explanation of its architecture and components. Some planning and sizing consideration before you implement the product is given, and some guidelines on setting up service engagement for the product are also included. The deployment discussed in the book would be appropriate for a demonstration or a small deployment system, although the information is highly relevant for larger deployments also. This book also offers some usage scenarios that can be used for demonstrating the product.The team that wrote this book This book was produced by a team of specialists from around the world working at the International Technical Support Organization, Austin Center.© Copyright IBM Corp. 2008. All rights reserved. ix
  11. 11. Budi Darmawan is a Project Leader at the International Technical Support Organization, Austin Center. He writes extensively and teaches IBM classes worldwide on all areas of Tivoli® and systems management. Before joining the ITSO eight years ago, Budi worked in IBM Indonesia as solution architect and lead implementer. His current interests are Java™ programming, application management and general systems management. Jörn Siglen is System Management Architect at IBM Global Services Germany. He has 16 years of experience in the Information Technology field. He holds a degree in Information Technology Engineering from Berufsakademie Stuttgart, Germany. His areas of expertise include AIX® on pSeries® and Tivoli software for monitoring, availability and storage products. Lennart Lundgren is an IT Specialist in IBM Software Group, Sweden. He has 30 years of experience in the Systems Management area on mainframe computers. He holds a degree in Computer Sciences from the University of Lund, Sweden. He has worked at IBM for more than 20 years. His areas of expertise include performance and capacity management, z/OS® systems programming, and tools development. Roy Catterall is a Team Leader for Tivoli Decision Support for z/OS in Australia. He has 20 years of experience in the Information Technology field. He holds a degree in Business Studies and Computing Science from the University of Zimbabwe. His main area of expertise is z/OS; he also has some programming experience with most other operating systems. He has contributed extensively to the Tivoli Decision Support for z/OS documentation. Thanks to the following people for their contributions to this project: Terry Copeland, Rodolfo Ambrosetti, Page L. Hite, Greg Howard IBM Software Group, Tivoli Systems Alfred Schwab, Editor International Technical Support Organization, Poughkeepsie CenterBecome a published author Join us for a two- to six-week residency program! Help write a book dealing with specific products or solutions, while getting hands-on experience with leading-edge technologies. You will have the opportunity to team with IBM technical professionals, Business Partners, and Clients.x Deployment Guide Series: IBM Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager V7.1
  12. 12. Your efforts will help increase product acceptance and customer satisfaction. As a bonus, you will develop a network of contacts in IBM development labs, and increase your productivity and marketability. Find out more about the residency program, browse the residency index, and apply online at: ibm.com/redbooks/residencies.htmlComments welcome Your comments are important to us! We want our books to be as helpful as possible. Send us your comments about this book or other IBM Redbooks® in one of the following ways: Use the online Contact us review Redbooks form found at: ibm.com/redbooks Send your comments in an e-mail to: redbooks@us.ibm.com Mail your comments to: IBM Corporation, International Technical Support Organization Dept. HYTD Mail Station P099 2455 South Road Poughkeepsie, NY 12601-5400 Preface xi
  13. 13. xii Deployment Guide Series: IBM Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager V7.1
  14. 14. Part 1Part 1 Planning© Copyright IBM Corp. 2008. All rights reserved. 1
  15. 15. 2 Deployment Guide Series: IBM Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager V7.1
  16. 16. 1 Chapter 1. Solution introduction IBM Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager V7.1 is a new version of a financial management tool for IT resources from Tivoli. It allows dynamic chargeback accounting, reporting, and analysis to be performed for enterprises. This chapter consists of the following: 1.1, “ITIL financial management” on page 4 1.2, “Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager features” on page 7 1.3, “Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager value proposition” on page 10 1.4, “Product architecture” on page 10© Copyright IBM Corp. 2008. All rights reserved. 3
  17. 17. 1.1 ITIL financial management In today’s environment, businesses are very dependent on IT. Requirements from customers for standard compliance are apparent and IT services are required to better align with business objectives. The IT Infrastructure Library® (ITIL®) is a set of best practices that can help address these issues. ITIL is a collection of IT best practices designed to help organizations overcome current and future technology challenges. Originally created by the UK Office of Government Commerce (OGC) in 1988, ITIL currently has evolved as a result of years of experience contributed by major IT organizations and companies, including IBM. ITIL is a library of books that document industry-accepted best practices for IT service, infrastructure, and application management. ITIL is an excellent starting point from which to adopt and adapt best practices for implementation in any IT environment. ITIL’s models show the goals, general activities, inputs, and outputs of the various processes. They help to address the most common questions asked by IT managers worldwide: How do I align IT services with business objectives? How do I lower the long term costs of IT services? How do I improve the quality of IT services? ITIL is currently on its Version 3 release. However, the discussion of ITIL in this book is mainly based on ITIL Version 2. In the Version 2 publication, the contents of ITIL are shown in Figure 1-1 on page 5.4 Deployment Guide Series: IBM Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager V7.1
  18. 18. Planning to implement service management Service management The technology The business The ICT Service support business Infrastructure perspective management Service delivery Security Software Asset management management Application managementFigure 1-1 The contents of ITILThe most popular books of the ITIL are Service Support and Service Delivery.These two books together form the Service Management discipline. The financialmanagement process is part of Service Delivery. This is apparent becausefinancial management is strategic for aligning IT to perform as a business entityand providing the ability to manage IT as a business.The Service Delivery aspect uses the configuration data for building IT services. Service Level Management manages service level agreements with IT consumers. Service level agreement is the base measurement of IT services that are provided to consumers. Financial management manages the day-to-day IT finances and quantifies IT investment into IT Service improvement. It also generates a balance report of IT budget and accounting. Availability management ensures that IT services are available to the business users. It identifies and mitigates risks involved with unavailability due to an IT resource failure. Capacity management ensures that IT can provide its services with reasonable performance as dictated by the service level agreement. This requires an adequate capacity of IT resources. Chapter 1. Solution introduction 5
  19. 19. IT continuity management ensures that IT would continue to function even when a major disruption happens to the business (such as a natural disaster). The financial management of ITIL, as a typical financial discipline, does the budgeting and accounting of IT services cash flow. With proper financial management, the IT budget can be related directly to each IT service. Thus, it supports the transformation of IT from a cost center into a business unit that can charge for its services to the customers. The primary goal of financial management is for IT to fully account for the money spent and attribute these costs to the IT services delivered. In order to achieve this goal, financial management must monitor usage and record cost of IT resources, as well as provide an investment business case. The financial management of IT is more effective if IT charges for usage based on a business entity instead of an IT entity. This is more meaningful for calculating the business cost of an IT service. The total CPU time for running a financial application would not be apparent to the CFO. However, the number of ledger entries processed would be a more meaningful measurement of the financial application usage. Initially, formulating and calculating these business aspects of the IT services necessitates a steep learning curve. However, as more information is collected and analyzed, the task will become easier. The primary activities of financial management are: Budgeting It must obtain a budget from the enterprise. It administers and controls the costs related to the budget. Accounting It performs financial accounting of IT. It must develop a cost model with its associated cost types. It apportions service cost, calculates cost, and performs Return of Investment (ROI) analysis. Charging It develops charging policies, identifies charging items, calculates pricing, and performs billing. Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager allows the collection of usage data, provides a mechanism to input pricing, and performs billing. It generates various reports for IT usages and provides financial tools for IT financial modelling.6 Deployment Guide Series: IBM Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager V7.1
  20. 20. 1.2 Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager features Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager is a general purpose tool for: Collecting resource usage data Assigning account codes for each resource Providing a billing (charging) rate for each unit Additionally, it provides reports for analysis of the charging environment to ensure that charges are correct and fair. It also offers a financial modeler feature that allows rate analysis based on IT expenditure. IBM Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager Enterprise Edition V7.1 is a resource accounting product that enables you to track, manage, allocate, and optionally bill end users for IT resources. Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager Enterprise Edition assists with: Usage-based accounting and chargeback IT cost allocation and analysis Application allocation and availability Resource utilization reporting Easy reporting through a Web interface Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager Enterprise Edition consolidates different types of usage metering data into an integrated reporting structure. It can then generate reports, invoices, and summary files that show resource consumption and cost for the various functional units of an organization. This information is presented in Web, print, or file formats for easy availability. IBM Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager Enterprise Edition contains the following: Administration Server, the central component, consisting of the following: – Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager Enterprise Edition Console This is the Abstract User Interface Markup Language rendering in ISC over the Web Administrator tool. – Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager Engine This consists of many components, including a batch processing facility called Job Runner that launches and controls the underlying processes that convert raw usage data into usable Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager Enterprise Edition information. It also contains the main rules engine processing components and other data transformation tools. – Generic collection functionality This consists of the Integrator and the Universal Collection tools that allow clients to build their own collectors. Chapter 1. Solution introduction 7
  21. 21. – Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager Windows® Web Reporting - from Internet Information Services (IIS) under Windows only This reports directly from the Microsoft® SQL Server™, Oracle®, or DB2® database using Microsoft Reporting Services runtime viewer as the underlying reporting engine and Microsoft IIS as the Web server. This Microsoft Reporting Services viewer must be separately downloaded from Microsoft and installed. It is not supplied with Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager Enterprise Edition. Limited Business Intelligence and Reporting Tools (BIRT) reporting directly from the database If non-Windows reporting is desired, there is a prerequisite that the client will download and install BIRT/IES prior to installation. This reporting can be run from UNIX® or Linux®. While it can also be run from Windows, the more powerful Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager Windows Web Reporting is the preferred Windows reporting method. The Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager Enterprise Edition - Core Data Collection Entitlements product, delivered in the same installation as Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager Enterprise Edition, contains: Windows disk usage Windows CPU processor usage VMware usage collector support z/VM® AIX Advanced Accounting, including support for Workload Partition, Virtual I/O Server, and any other Advanced Accounting features UNIX, Linux, Linux on System z™ operating system UNIX, Linux, Linux on System z file system System i™ (collects all usage from System i, but the actual collector must be run from Windows) Tivoli Decision Support on z/OS extract (similar to the Accounting Workstation Option or IBM Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager Enterprise Edition for z/OS) Generic Collection (also known as Universal Collection) Miscellaneous and Recurring Adjustment Transaction Maintenance The Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager Enterprise Collector Pack (a separate purchasable option) contains the following collectors. A designation of sample only means that the collector is not fully documented, is not globalized or tested, and may not run on all platforms. It is provided as a starting point only, but the sample collectors will be supported, via the Level 2/Level 3 support process. A notation of Windows only means that the collector or sample runs only under Windows, not under Linux or UNIX. TotalStorage® Productivity Center8 Deployment Guide Series: IBM Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager V7.1
  22. 22. Tivoli Storage Manager (Windows only) SAP® WebSphere® XD WebSphere XD HTTP Squid (Windows only, sample only) Veritas (Windows only, sample only) Windows System Resource Monitor (Windows only, sample only) Microsoft Reporting Services (Windows only, sample only) Evolve (Windows only, sample only) Citrix (Windows only, sample only) NetWare (Windows only, sample only) Oracle Oracle Space DB2 Usage DB2 Space Apache Web Server Usage FTP transfer usage (Windows only, sample only) Lotus® Notes® SQL Server (Windows only) DBSpace Sybase (Windows only, sample only) Apache Microsoft IIS Microsoft Internet Security and Acceleration (ISA) (Windows only, sample only) Microsoft Proxy (Windows only, sample only) Netscape Proxy (Windows only, sample only) Exchange (Windows only) SendMail (Windows only, sample only) Windows Print (Windows only) NetBackup (Windows only, sample only) NetFlow (Windows only, sample only)New in IBM Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager Enterprise Edition V7.1 arethe following: A fully globalized product A platform-independent reporting option New data collectors Improved integration with Tivoli Decision Support for z/OS for mainframe resource accounting A Web-based administration tool Chapter 1. Solution introduction 9
  23. 23. 1.3 Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager value proposition Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager helps IT to control and manage operation and resource costs by collecting, analyzing, reporting, and billing based on usage and costs of shared Windows, UNIX (AIX, HP/UX, Sun™ Solaris™), Linux (Red Hat and Novell SUSE), i5/OS®, and VMware computing resources. Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager helps you improve IT cost management. With it you can understand your costs and track, allocate, and invoice based on actual resource use by department, user, and many additional criteria. Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager consolidates a wide variety of usage data with data collectors associated with Operating Systems, Databases, Internet Infrastructure, E-mail Systems, Network & Printing, and customized usage Data Import collection from any application or system. This broad set of customer-proven data collectors across multiple platforms, combined with a powerful business rules-driven capability to transform raw IT data into business information, enables cost allocation across business units, cost centers, applications, and users. Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager allows you to do the following: Support virtualization and server consolidation to help manage costs Align IT with business goals by revealing who consumes which resources Easily administer cost allocation initiatives with little human intervention Improve flexibility and cost management by charging for IT resource use in accordance with popular methods1.4 Product architecture The main components used by IBM Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager are shown in Figure 1-2.10 Deployment Guide Series: IBM Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager V7.1
  24. 24. Collection Tivoli Decision Administration Vmware Data Support for z/ Reporting collector OS Web Services File Database SDK Application Reporting Server Processing Server File Integrated Reporting with BIRT Solution Console Process engine Embedded WebSphere Application Server Web Reporting Financial Modeler Microsoft Internet JDBC Information Server ITUAMDB ODBC (.NET)Figure 1-2 Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager components in use and their dependencies The major components of are: Collection The collection of metering data is mostly handled by the operating systems and other applications. Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager data collectors read this data or provide access to the databases where the data is stored. The data collection can be performed from a database table, a file to be converted into Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager format, or by calling Web Services to collect metrics. Application server The Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager application server consists of two primary functions: the administration server and processing server. – Administration This is performed using the Integrated Solutions Console (ISC). ISC is an application running on top of an embedded WebSphere Application Chapter 1. Solution introduction 11
  25. 25. Server. It provides the front end for all administration of the Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager server. – Gathering and processing of usage and accounting The collection of Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager collector files can be done with a file transfer method or accessed directly from a database or Web Services. Processing of this data is performed using the ProcessEngine and the Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager integrator function. It handles all data processing and data loading into the Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager database. The Java-based Job Runner controls the processing steps. All job descriptions are stored in Extensible Markup Language (XML) files. Database server A relational database system is required for storing the administration, metering, and accounting data. The database is accessed using the JDBC™ driver, except for reporting, which uses the DB2 .NET interface. This driver must be provided for each component that needs access to the database. Reporting server All reports are generated from the Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager database and can be stored on a file system for publishing or distribution. Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager provides reporting using Microsoft Report Viewer under Microsoft Internet Information Server or using Business Intelligence and Reporting Tools (BIRT).1.4.1 Generic processing flow The data processing in Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager is similar for all data sources. Figure 1-3 on page 13 shows the general processing steps for data handling with IBM Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager. The order or mix of the steps may be different, depending on the collectors used.12 Deployment Guide Series: IBM Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager V7.1
  26. 26. Collected Common Source data files Resource Aggregation (CSR) file Data Collector Summarized data (CSR) Web or data base dataSource reprocess Exception file Account Account Table (CSR) Conversion Output file Output file (CSR+) files Output (CSR+) (CSR+) ITUAMDB Database Load Scan (Merging) Billing Summary Billing Output Merged output Ident file file file (CSR+) Normalization & Normalization Billing (applying rate) & Rate TableFigure 1-3 Generic process overview, including common steps The process steps in Figure 1-3 are: 1. Many systems already have a resource usage collection function. Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager uses this data for further processing. The main processing in Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager is based on the Common Source Resource (CSR) format. The initial processing step converts the existing data (SQL table, delimited file, or others) into CSR format prior to Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager processing. a. If the metering data is collected in files, these will be transferred to the application server and converted to CSR format if needed. Some converters may also include pre-aggregation. Chapter 1. Solution introduction 13
  27. 27. b. If the metering data can be accessed in a database or on a Web page, the data extract made by Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager will be direct CSR format. The Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager Integrator can include CSR conversion, aggregation, account code conversion, and sort in one step, producing only one output file. 2. CSR data is aggregated mostly on a daily basis. Aggregation means summarizing the data based on given identifiers. It calculates the sum of data of resource fields based on the identifier values. 3. Account conversion matches the metering data to the account code structure (see 5.2, “Defining accounting resources” on page 95) and all records that do not fit are put into an exception file, which may be reprocessed later after some intervention. 4. CSR or CSR+ files of the same type can be scanned into one file at any time during the processing. 5. Normalization of CPU values and multiplying by the rate code is the next step. The selected Rate Table is used for calculating the money value. If the rate is of type CPU, the recalculation based on the Normalization Table is done in addition. Summarize data on a financial and organizational level, which provides the billing files: billing detail, billing summary, and identifier list. 6. Loading all output data into the Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager DB completes the processing. There is an automatic duplicate detection that prevents duplicate data loading. Note: We recommend to create CSR+ records as input for the billing step, or alternatively to use the Integrator Sort on the account code. The number of billing summary rows in the database can be reduced on a CSR file sorted by the account code. CSR+ data is automatically sorted by the bill process.1.4.2 The Common Source Resource format Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager uses two file formats, Common Source Resource (CSR) and Common Source Resource plus (CSR+). CSR+ is enhanced by a static header, including the account code for sorting purposes. CSR+ and CSR files are comma-separated files, in which each record has these three sections: Header The header of the record contains the following:14 Deployment Guide Series: IBM Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager V7.1
  28. 28. CSR Plus Header CSR+ records only start with “CSR+ constant headerstartdate Usage start date headerenddate Usage end date headeraccountcodelength Length of the Account code (three digits) headeraccountcode Account Code “constantheaderrectype Record type or sourceheaderstartdate Usage start dateheaderenddate Usage end dateheaderstarttime Usage start timeheaderendtime Usage end timeheadershiftcode Shift codeThe header information is used to identify the applicability of the record to acertain billing period and type. Tip: All header% variables can be used with the Integrator identifier functions.A sample header segment for CSR is:UNIXSPCK,20071016,20071016,00:00:00,23:59:59,1A sample header for CSR+ starts with:“CSR+2007101620071016009AIX 0Test“,UNIXSPCK,20071016,..Identifiers segmentThe identifiers segment lists the resource identifiers. These identifiers areused to distinguish one resource from another before mapping them to anaccount code. The account code itself is considered an identifier. Thestructure of this segment is:number of identifiers, identifier name, identifier value...A sample identifier segment with three identifiers is:3,SYSTEM_ID,"lpar04",Account_Code,"AIX 1TEST lpar04", USERNAME,"root"Resources segmentThe resources segment lists the resource metrics. These metrics are used tometer the usage information for the resource. The resource metric isstructured as follows:# of resources, resource metric name, resource metric value...A sample resources segment with three metrics is:3,LLG102,17.471,LLG107,6.914,LLG108,3 Chapter 1. Solution introduction 15
  29. 29. Example 1-1 shows the data from two AIX LPARs on two different systems. Example 1-1 CSR file for AIX Advanced Accounting data AATRID10,20071030,20071030,01:10:03,01:10:03,1,2,SYSTEM_ID,"02101F170", Account_Code,"AIX 1TEST lpar04",1,AAID1002,0.016 AATRID10,20071030,20071030,01:15:03,01:15:03,1,2,SYSTEM_ID,"02101F170", Account_Code,"AIX 1TEST lpar04",1,AAID1002,0.004 AATRID4,20071030,20071030,02:30:07,02:30:07,1,2,SYSTEM_ID,"02101F25F",A ccount_Code,"AIX 0SAP ohm01",2,AAID0402,120,AAID0407,2048 In Example 1-2 we find the data from two VMware ESX servers (SYSTEM_ID) and three VMware guests (Instance) collected via one VirtualCenter Server (Feed). Example 1-2 CSR file for VMWare processing VMWARE,20071017,20071017,00:00:00,23:59:59,1,5,HostName,"host-19",Insta nce,"vm-33",Feed,"ITSC_VC",Account_Code,"WIN 1ESX",SYSTEM_ID,"srv079.it sc.austin.ibm.com",1,VMCPUUSE,10756036 VMWARE,20071017,20071017,00:00:00,23:59:59,1,5,HostName,"host-19",Insta nce,"vm-41",Feed,"ITSC_VC",Account_Code,"WIN 4ESX",SYSTEM_ID,"srv079.it sc.austin.ibm.com",1,VMCPUUSE,10688008 VMWARE,20071017,20071017,00:00:00,23:59:59,1,5,HostName,"host-8",Instan ce,"vm-31",Feed,"ITSC_VC",Account_Code,"WIN 0ESX",SYSTEM_ID,"srv106.its c.austin.ibm.com",1,VMCPUUSE,637429 The Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager defines some reserved identifiers that are used for special processing. These are: Account_Code Will be matched with the Account Code Structure and used for Rate Table selection and Reporting Aggregation SYSTEM_ID Used for reading the factor from the Normalization Table during CPU normalization WORK_ID Optionally used for CPU normalization on the z/OS data collector specifying a subsystem such as TSO, JES2, or any other application (also not z/OS), if needed Feed Identifies and defines a subfolder in the process folder for data transfer16 Deployment Guide Series: IBM Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager V7.1
  30. 30. 2 Chapter 2. Solution environment This chapter explains the Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager solution environment. The discussion covers the following: 2.1, “Hardware prerequisites” on page 18 2.2, “Software prerequisites” on page 18 2.3, “Sizing considerations” on page 21 2.4, “Typical deployment environment” on page 27© Copyright IBM Corp. 2008. All rights reserved. 17
  31. 31. 2.1 Hardware prerequisites The most up-to-date prerequisites (hardware and software) for Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager can be retrieved from the following Web page: http://www-306.ibm.com/software/tivoli/products/usage-accounting/platfo rms.html The following hardware is recommended for running Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager V7.1: Processor with speed of 3 GHz or more for application server or Web reporting server. An additional 2 GB of free memory for application server or Web reporting server. The database server uses 80 GB of hard drive space. Web reporting server uses 40 GB of hard drive space. Note: The space requirement may vary; see 2.3, “Sizing considerations” on page 21 for more information.2.2 Software prerequisites The software prerequisites are divided into: 2.2.1, “Supported operating systems” on page 19 2.2.2, “Supported databases” on page 21 All other required software components, such as WebSphere Application Server and Integrated Solution Console, are packaged with the software itself. See also: http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/tivihelp/v3r1/index.jsp?topic= /com.ibm.ituam.doc_7.1/install/r_app_server_specs_win.html http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/tivihelp/v3r1/index.jsp?topic= /com.ibm.ituam.doc_7.1/install/r_app_server_specs_unix.html18 Deployment Guide Series: IBM Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager V7.1
  32. 32. 2.2.1 Supported operating systems Table 2-1 lists the supported operating systems.Table 2-1 Supported operating systems Platform Server Collector Reporting Web client AIX 5.2 Yes Yes No Yes AIX 5.3 Yes Yes BIRT only AIX 6.1 a Yes Yes BIRT only Yes Solaris 9 – SPARC Yes Yes No Yes Solaris 10 – SPARC Yes Yes No Yes Solaris 10 – x64 No Yes No Yes HP-UX 10.20 No Yes No Yes HP-UX 11i Yes Yes No Yes HP-UX 11.23 Itanium® No Yes No No Windows 2000 Pro No Yes No No Windows 2000 Server No Yes No No Windows 2000 Advanced Server No Yes No No Windows 2000 Data Center Server No Yes No No Windows XP Professional – x86 No No No Yes Windows XP Professional – x64 No No No Yes Windows Server® 2003 Standard – x86 Yes Yes Yes Yes Windows Server 2003 Enterprise – x86 Yes Yes Yes Yes Windows Server 2003 Datacenter – x86 Yes Yes Yes Yes Windows Server 2003 Web Edition – x86 Yes Yes Yes Yes Windows Server 2003 Standard – x64 Yes Yes Yes Yes Windows Server 2003 Enterprise – x64 Yes Yes Yes Yes Windows Server 2003 Datacenter – x64 Yes Yes Yes Yes Windows Server 2003 Web Edition – x64 Yes Yes Yes Yes Windows Vista® No Yes No Yes Chapter 2. Solution environment 19
  33. 33. Platform Server Collector Reporting Web client RHEL 4.0 for x86 Yes Yes No Yes RHEL 5.0 for x86 Yes Yes No Yes RHEL 4.0 for AMD64 ¤ EM64T Yes Yes No Yes RHEL 5.0 for AMD64 ¤ EM64T Yes Yes No Yes RHEL 4.0 for System i No No No Yes RHEL 5.0 for System i No No No Yes RHEL 4.0 for System z (64 bit) Yes Yes No Yes RHEL 5.0 for System z (64 bit) Yes Yes No Yes RHEL 4.0 for PowerPC® Yes Yes No Yes RHEL 5.0 for PowerPC Yes Yes No Yes SLES 9 for x86 Yes Yes No Yes SLES 10 for x86 Yes Yes No Yes SLES 9 for AMD64 ¤ EM64T Yes Yes No Yes SLES 10 for AMD64 ¤ EM64T Yes Yes No Yes SLES 9 for System z (64 bit) Yes Yes No Yes SLES 10 for System z (64 bit) Yes Yes No Yes SLES 9.0 for PowerPC Yes Yes No Yes SLES 10 for PowerPC Yes Yes No Yes VMware ESX No Yes No No i5/OS v5 No Yes No No zVM No Yes No No z/OS v 1.1 No Yes No No z/OS v1.2 No Yes No No z/OS v1.3 No Yes No No z/OS v1.4 No Yes No No z/OS v1.3, v1.4, v1.5, v1.6, v1.7, and v1.8b No Yes No No a. With support for advanced accounting collection for AIX V5.3 and AIX V6.20 Deployment Guide Series: IBM Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager V7.1
  34. 34. b. Available only with the Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager for z/OS Option of Tivoli Decision Support for z/OS.2.2.2 Supported databases Table 2-2 lists the supported databases. Table 2-2 Supported databases Database Server Collector DB2 UDB 7.1 No Yes DB2 UDB 7.2 No Yes DB2 UDB 8.1 Yes Yes DB2 UDB 8.2 Yes Yes DB2 UDB 9.1 Yes Yes DB2 8.1 System z Yes No MS SQL Server 2000 Yes Yes MS SQL Server 2005 Yes Yes Oracle 8i No Yes Oracle 9i Yes Yes Oracle 9i v2 Yes Yes Oracle 10 Yes Yes2.3 Sizing considerations The sizing considerations for Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager deployment are mainly related to the data size. The initial Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager server database using DB2 Universal Database™ in Windows uses approximately 350 MB. This section provides an overview for estimating the Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager database growth. The estimation has not been tested with actual customer environments—it is only used for estimating our database size in our sample environment. Chapter 2. Solution environment 21
  35. 35. We start by checking our database size in our Windows directory or Linux file system just after it is initialized. The data size is roughly 350 MB, including the database catalog and database log files. However, as Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager is a data collection and processing tool, it collects and loads data into the database and keeps it for some period of time. Estimating its growth is critical for ensuring that the space is properly allocated and the resulting performance impact can be addressed (such as the time to back up the data, query response time, replication need, and so on).2.3.1 Data elements The primary growth of data is for usage and accounting data. These are: Resource utilization The collection of the resource metric usage from the AcctCSR file; collection is provided by identifier for each resource (rate code). This is an optional collection. You do not need to collect the resource usage. Billing summary This provides a summary usage for each resource (rate code) by account code. It is important that the input to the billing cycle is sorted by account code to minimize duplicate summary records. The data is a one-to-one mapping from the BillSummary.txt file. Billing detail This provides individual entries from the AcctCSR file. It gives individual occurrences of source usage by resource name (rate code). This links to the identifier table for getting the identifier key for each of the entries. The data is a one-to-one mapping from the BillDetail.txt file. Identifier table This lists the identifiers that are used by each Billing detail entry. The data is a one-to-one mapping from the Ident.txt file. Figure 2-1 on page 23 provides an overview of the relationship between these tables.22 Deployment Guide Series: IBM Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager V7.1
  36. 36. Detail Ident Billing Detail Billing Summary LOADTRACKINGUID LOADTRACKINGUID LOADTRACKINGUID DETAILUID Get DETAILUID YEAR DETAILLINE identifier DETAILLINE PERIOD IDENTNUMBER ACCOUNTCODE SHIFT IDENTVALUE AGGREGATE ACCOUNTCODE STARTDATE Summarize, LENLEVEL% ENDDATE aggregate on RATETABLE SHIFTCODE Account_Code RATECODE AUDITCODE STARTDATE SOURCESYSTEM ENDDATE RATECODE RATEVALUE RESOURCEUNITS RESOURCEUNITS ACCOUNTINGSTARTDATE BREAKID ACCOUNTINGENDDATE MONEYVALUE USAGESTARTDATE USAGEENDDATE RUNDATE Resource Utilization BILLFLAG% Get LOADTRACKINGUID identifier DETAILUID DETAILLINE ACCOUNTCODE AGGREGATE STARTDATE ENDDATE SHIFTCODE AUDITCODE SOURCESYSTEM RATECODE RESOURCEUNITSFigure 2-1 Table relationships Some important tips for database size are: You should run the DBpurge program using Job runner to remove old data. Because Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager data is an accounting financial tool, you may want to archive the data first. The data details can be huge and less useful than the summary data. You may want to purge detail data more often. Use the CSR+ format, and perform a sort before you run the Bill processing. The sorting with the CSR+ format is based on the account code and optimizes the billing process. Only collect the identifiers and resources that you are interested in. Modify the sample collection jobs, change the mapping, and remove any unwanted identifiers and resource fields. The number of identifiers and resources is a size multiplier for the tables. Chapter 2. Solution environment 23
  37. 37. 2.3.2 Growth factors Now let’s look at each of the tables and analyze what the parameters are that affect their sizes. The following are the size multipliers: Number of days The retention period of your data before you run the purge step to remove them. Number of shift The number of shifts in a day that need different rate codes. Collection source Each collection source is processed with a different job. Each will generate a different set of data. Account code All billing and resource tables are indexed by the account code entry. This is the primary retrieval mechanism for Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager data. You must estimate the number of distinct account codes. Number of resources The resources are mapped directly as rate code. These rate codes are the secondary search mechanism for Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager. Number of identifiers Each identifier is put in a different row in the CIMSDETAILIDENT table. Identifier mix This is the number of unique identifiers in each collection. You should be able to estimate this number by your understanding of the collection process. As an example, for Windows, you can count the number of running processes in the day as the identifier mix. Now regarding the tables themselves, which of the above items maps? Table 2-3 lists the affecting factors and estimates the row size of the tables. Table 2-3 Table estimation Name Row Affecting source sizea CIMSRESOURCE 300 Source, Account_Code, Identifier mix, UTILIZATION RateCode, Shift, #day CIMSSUMMARY 300 Source, Account_Code, RateCode, Shift, #day CIMSDETAIL 350 Source, Account_Code, Identifier mix, Rate per id, Shift, #day CIMSDETAILIDENT 75 Identifier mix x Ident count24 Deployment Guide Series: IBM Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager V7.1
  38. 38. a. The row size is an estimate based on the table structure and using the assumption that a VARCHAR or VARGRAPHIC column uses half its capacity.2.3.3 Sample growth estimation For the purpose of this sample, the following are the collected facts: Data is kept for two years, except that the detail data is for one year. Two shifts are collected. The account structure is in the form client - department - application - host. Collected usage information is for UNIX processes and Windows processes only. Average identifier length is 20 characters. Audit code is not used. Percentage of complete records, since some of the accounting data only has partial data. Some of the metrics may not appear in all records. We just use 75%. For the UNIX processes, collection is performed on 15 machines. There are 12 resource metrics that are collected. The identifier fields are Feed, Account_Code, hostname, userName, and process. The estimated number of processes per day is 250. For Windows processes, collection is performed on 20 machines. There are 8 resource metrics that are collected. The identifier fields are Feed, Account_Code, Server, User, processName (we assume that BasePriority, PriorityClass and ProgramPath fields are dropped). The estimated number of processes per day is 100. The number of unique identifiers in both UNIX and Windows processes will be the estimated number of processes. The number of account codes would then be derived from the account code structure. As mentioned above, the account code structure is client - department - application - host. It is important to plan this structure and how these items can be identified. This example assumes that the account code elements are retrieved as follows: Host is retrieved from hostname or Server identifiers. Application is derived using a lookup table based on the server, user, and program name. Department is derived from the application. Client is derived from the department. Chapter 2. Solution environment 25
  39. 39. Based on the specification, we conclude that the number of unique account codes would be the same as the number of applications (or applications by host). We just assume here that the number of applications represents the number of unique account codes. Now we can start performing the calculation. First, we collected the multipliers as shown in Figure 2-2. Figure 2-2 Estimating the multipliers In Figure 2-2, the account structure is estimated by listing the component occurrences. We used the number of applications as the number of unique account codes. All the other numbers are collected from the discussion. The resulting table sizes are shown in Figure 2-3. Figure 2-3 Table size result As shown in Figure 2-3, the total data size is around 309 GB. We assume that we do not collect the resource utilization table.26 Deployment Guide Series: IBM Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager V7.1
  40. 40. 2.4 Typical deployment environment Based on the architecture of Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager discussed in 1.4, “Product architecture” on page 10, we can identify the following deployment environment structures: 2.4.1, “Small, proof of concept, or demonstration environment” on page 27 2.4.2, “Medium scale production environment” on page 27 2.4.3, “Large scale production environment” on page 282.4.1 Small, proof of concept, or demonstration environment This small scale environment installs all components in a single Windows-based server that allows hosting of the database, application server, and Web reporting server on a single machine. This is not recommended in a larger environment because the load for the processing may interfere with the reporting activities. The configuration of this environment is shown in Figure 2-4. Embedded WebSphere Application Server 6.1 Integrated Solution Console Microsoft Report Viewer Microsoft Internet Information Services ITUAM reporting application ITUAM processing engine ITUAM data collectors Database ITUAMDB ITUAM server Figure 2-4 Small scale environment2.4.2 Medium scale production environment The medium scale production environment still employs a single database. However, the processing and Web reporting functionality have been moved into different servers to allow better load distribution. There may also be the need to have a processing server on a different platform. The configuration of this environment is shown in Figure 2-5 on page 28. Chapter 2. Solution environment 27
  41. 41. Embedded WebSphere Application Server 6.1 Microsoft Report Viewer Integrated Solution Console Microsoft Internet Information Services ITUAM processing engine ITUAM reporting application ITUAM data collectors Application Reporting Application server server server ITUAMDBFigure 2-5 Medium scale deployment2.4.3 Large scale production environment In a large scale environment, data size may become quite large. Isolation between different reporting applications and processing applications may be necessary. An external data replication mechanism (such as DB2 replication) may be employed to synchronize database copies. Data load processing would not impact report generation, and, conversely, report generation is not hindered by data loading. This environment is depicted in Figure 2-6 on page 29.28 Deployment Guide Series: IBM Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager V7.1
  42. 42. Embedded WebSphere Application Server 6.1 Microsoft Report Viewer Integrated Solution Console Microsoft Internet Information Services ITUAM processing engine ITUAM reporting application ITUAM data collectors Application Reporting Application server server server replication ITUAMDB ITUAMDBFigure 2-6 Large scale environment Chapter 2. Solution environment 29
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  44. 44. 3 Chapter 3. Project planning This chapter discusses the necessary preparation for running a deployment project for Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager. The discussion is divided into: 3.1, “Required skills” on page 32 3.2, “Solution description and assumptions” on page 32 3.3, “Task breakdown” on page 33© Copyright IBM Corp. 2008. All rights reserved. 31
  45. 45. 3.1 Required skills For the implementation of Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager V7.1, you would want to have the following prerequisite skills: Database skill for the database that you are using Operating system skill for the platform that you are using Usage data collection from the source platform Microsoft Reporting Server skill for developing new reports Understanding of the accounting and charge back system Apart from the above requirements, you would have to know the Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager itself. This includes: Working with Integrated Solution Console (ISC) Working with Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager job runner Performing file transformation into Common Source Format (CSR) IBM Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager V7.1, SG24-7404 can also be used to get more information about these items.3.2 Solution description and assumptions The Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager solution performs the following: Collects usage information from a customer’s system Stores usage and accounting data in its database Generates reports or invoices for usage data The data collection methodology must be established using a series of planning sessions with the customer. In these sessions, the following items should be addressed: List of the data sources and their access methods to get the usage data, or if a supported method is available, this has to be understood. Some collection requires a certain feature to be enabled and certain authority may be needed to get access to this usage information. Understand the departmental structure of the customer to correctly define the account code structure that would allow a breakdown of accounting information to the appropriate department entity.32 Deployment Guide Series: IBM Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager V7.1
  46. 46. Identify the granularity of data collection from the customer to correctly calculate the data space requirements Identify the required charging items from the customer and how to get the data unit from the raw usage data Identify the reporting and maybe invoice requirements from the customer Based on the above requirements from the customer, you can start developing the solution configuration and implementation methods. The configuration involves defining where to put critical components, such as application server and Web reporting server; the implementation method, including deployment of the server and data collectors. Sometimes you can perform only a sub-set of the identified final configuration. The complete configuration would be up to the customer to implement. You must predetermine the initial sub-set to implement that is representative of the final configuration.3.3 Task breakdown The detailed tasks for Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager implementation are divided into: 3.3.1, “Project kick-off” on page 33 3.3.2, “Environment preparation” on page 34 3.3.3, “Database setup” on page 34 3.3.4, “Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager server installation” on page 34 3.3.5, “Data collection pack setup” on page 34 3.3.6, “Customizing the product” on page 35 3.3.7, “Demonstrating the solution and skill transfer” on page 353.3.1 Project kick-off The kick-off of the project is a critical task during which the participants are identified, the roles and responsibilities are presented, and a generic project plan is laid out. The kick-off is also an important milestone to promote the project to the customer’s user base and generate interest for the project. Chapter 3. Project planning 33
  47. 47. 3.3.2 Environment preparation The initial environment preparation has these objectives: Installing and preparing the new server machines with the appropriate operating system and network connectivity. This applies to the machines that will run the database, the application server, and the Web reporting server. Identifying client or agent machines on which data collectors will be installed. This includes tabulating their IP addresses, hostnames, owners, access to the machine, and other relevant information. Collecting installation media and required software for the installation. Depending on the size of the implementation and the readiness of the environment, this can take several hours or several days.3.3.3 Database setup Once the environment preparation is done, you can install the supported database product. The database will be used as the center of processing for Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager. Depending on the database configuration, you may set up additional features such as replication to improve the data availability. We will demonstrate DB2 Enterprise Server Edition V9.1 in 4.2, “Installing DB2” on page 41.3.3.4 Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager server installation Depending on how many servers you want to configure, you may need to run the Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager installation program several times. The installation program installs all the necessary components including an embedded WebSphere Application Server and, in Windows, it also installs the Web reporting application. The detailed procedure of this installation is provided in 4.4, “Installing server components” on page 65.3.3.5 Data collection pack setup Data collection pack installation is platform dependent. We demonstrate the Windows collector pack installation in 4.7, “Installing Windows Process Collector” on page 85. Some of the collector pack can be deployed using the Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager job interface.34 Deployment Guide Series: IBM Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager V7.1
  48. 48. 3.3.6 Customizing the product Product customization includes: Defining Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager configuration objects Defining Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager rates, rate groups, calendar, clients, and schedules Collecting usage data Creating data loading jobs Customizing reports This is where the design of the solution is implemented. The identified requirement from 3.2, “Solution description and assumptions” on page 32 should be realized in this task. This task is discussed in 4.6, “Initial configuration” on page 71.3.3.7 Demonstrating the solution and skill transfer After the customization has been completed and the solution is in place, you can demonstrate the result to the customer. This demonstration can serve as your completion milestone. You must also perform skill transfer so the customer’s personnel can operate and maintain the solution on a day-to-day basis. This is an important task that ensures smooth handover of the project. The demonstration tasks are provided in Chapter 5, “Usage demonstration” on page 93. Chapter 3. Project planning 35
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  50. 50. Part 2Part 2 Deployment© Copyright IBM Corp. 2008. All rights reserved. 37
  51. 51. 38 Deployment Guide Series: IBM Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager V7.1
  52. 52. 4 Chapter 4. Installation and configuration This chapter discusses the installation and configuration of Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager. The discussion is divided into the following topics: 4.1, “Installation overview” on page 40 4.2, “Installing DB2” on page 41 4.3, “Installing server prerequisites” on page 54 4.4, “Installing server components” on page 65 4.5, “Installing Enterprise Collector Pack” on page 69 4.6, “Initial configuration” on page 71 4.7, “Installing Windows Process Collector” on page 85© Copyright IBM Corp. 2008. All rights reserved. 39
  53. 53. 4.1 Installation overview The installation in this chapter is done in a single-server environment. The deployment is done on a Windows 2003 Standard Edition with Service Pack 1 machine as shown in Figure 4-1. tuamsrv DB2 UDB 9.1 Usage Accounting Manager 7.1 EE Embedded WebSphere Application Server 6.1 Integrated Solution Console Usage Accounting Manager 7.1 ECP Usage Accounting Manager 7.1 WPC z twin01 twin02 Windows Process Collector Windows Process Collector Figure 4-1 Installation environment The steps are: 1. Installation of the server: a. DB2 Universal Database installation and database creation as discussed in 4.2, “Installing DB2” on page 41. b. Microsoft Internet Information Server, Microsoft .NET framework and Microsoft Report Viewer are needed for the Web reporting application; see 4.3, “Installing server prerequisites” on page 54. c. Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager Enterprise Edition server, which includes an embedded WebSphere Application Server and Integrated Solution Console application, is installed in 4.4, “Installing server components” on page 65. d. The supported collectors are installed in a bundle called the Enterprise Collector Pack as discussed in 4.5, “Installing Enterprise Collector Pack” on page 69. e. Some setup of the Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager application using the Integrated Solution Console is needed; see 4.6, “Initial configuration” on page 71.40 Deployment Guide Series: IBM Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager V7.1

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