Safeguarding ppt

911 views

Published on

Published in: Education, Health & Medicine
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
911
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
35
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Safeguarding ppt

  1. 1. <ul>Introduction to Safeguarding & The Mental Capacity Act 2005 </ul><ul>PAULA BENNETTS </ul><ul>Quinn Centre Training Manager </ul>
  2. 2. <ul>SAFEGUARDING </ul><ul>WHO DOES SAFEGUARDING PROTECT? </ul><ul><li>CHILDREN
  3. 3. VULNERABLE ADULTS
  4. 4. STAFF </li></ul>
  5. 5. <ul>BACKGROUND </ul><ul><li>Approximately 46,000 children in the UK are known to be at risk of abuse (2010) </li></ul><ul><li>Neglect is the most common form of abuse (2010)
  6. 6. 1 in 4 young adults were severely maltreated during childhood (2010)
  7. 7. 500,000 elderly people are currently experiencing abuse
  8. 8. 51% of inpatients on mental health wards reported feeling threatened whilst at hospital
  9. 9. Orofacial trauma occurs in 50% of children diagnosed with physical abuse </li></ul>
  10. 10. <ul>WHO IS A VULNERABLE ADULT? </ul><ul>“ a person aged 18 years or over, who is - or may be - in need of community care services by reason of mental or other disability, age or illness” “ a person who is - or may be - unable to take care of him or herself against significant harm or exploitation” </ul><ul>‘ No Secrets’ (Department of Health , March 2000). </ul>
  11. 11. <ul>TYPES OF ABUSE </ul><ul><li>Physical
  12. 12. Sexual
  13. 13. Emotional / Psychological
  14. 14. Financial
  15. 15. Discriminatory Abuse
  16. 16. Institutional Abuse
  17. 17. Neglect / Acts of Omission </li></ul>
  18. 18. <ul>INDICATORS - signs & symptoms </ul><ul>PHYSICAL </ul><ul><ul><li>Explanation given is not consistent with injuries
  19. 19. Bruising in unusual areas
  20. 20. Multiple bruising/fractures not consistent with a fall
  21. 21. Signs of forced feeding
  22. 22. Bruised eyes, slap marks
  23. 23. Torn Frenum in non mobile infant
  24. 24. Intra-oral injuries inconsistent with explanation given
  25. 25. Disclosure / Allegation </li></ul></ul>
  26. 26. <ul>INDICATORS - signs & symptoms </ul><ul>SEXUAL ABUSE </ul><ul><ul><li>Pregnancy in a person who is not able to consent
  27. 27. Psychosomatic indicators
  28. 28. Sudden and unexplained confusion
  29. 29. Upset / agitated when being touched or looked at - or suggestions of this happening
  30. 30. Sudden self-harming behaviour
  31. 31. Inappropriate sexual behaviour or knowledge
  32. 32. Disclosure / allegation </li></ul></ul>
  33. 33. <ul>INDICATORS - signs & symptoms </ul><ul>EMOTIONAL </ul><ul><ul><li>Fearful, anxious, withdrawn, non-communicative
  34. 34. Fearful of caregiver (attachment disorder)
  35. 35. Name calling, insulting, withholding affection
  36. 36. Educational failure
  37. 37. Lack of social responsiveness
  38. 38. indiscriminate friendliness
  39. 39. Social Immaturity / Poor Growth
  40. 40. Disclosure / Allegation </li></ul></ul>
  41. 41. <ul>INDICATORS - signs & symptoms </ul><ul>NEGLECT </ul><ul><ul><li>Unusual weight loss, malnutrition, dehydration
  42. 42. Untreated physical problems
  43. 43. Being left dirty or not bathed (ingrained)
  44. 44. Listless, tired, uninvolved, disinterested
  45. 45. Failure to thrive / developmental delay
  46. 46. Withdrawn or inappropriately attention seeking
  47. 47. Inappropriate clothing, cold/hot weather
  48. 48. Disclosure / Allegation </li></ul></ul>
  49. 49. <ul>INDICATORS - signs & symptoms </ul><ul>DENTAL NEGLECT </ul><ul>“ wilful failure of parent or guardian to seek & follow through with treatment necessary to ensure a level of oral health essential for adequate function & freedom from pain & infection.” </ul><ul><ul><li>WILFUL </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>IGNORANCE </li></ul></ul>
  50. 50. <ul>KEEPING STAFF SAFE </ul><ul><li>Touch - appropriate / inappropriate
  51. 51. Grooming
  52. 52. Not everyone is as trustworthy as you
  53. 53. Best Interests
  54. 54. No Secrets
  55. 55. Keep “alone” time to a minimum - open door
  56. 56. Ask yourself - “If someone was watching…”
  57. 57. Are they vulnerable
  58. 58. What might happen if I do nothing? </li></ul>
  59. 59. <ul>BARRIERS TO REPORTING </ul><ul><li>Self Reporting - difficulties, disability, threat, English not their first language
  60. 60. Staff - Concern about whistle blowing
  61. 61. Staff - Concern that reporting will make situation worse
  62. 62. Staff - Concern that they are wrong
  63. 63. Staff - Feel they do not have enough evidence to diagnose
  64. 64. Staff/Victim - Fear of reprisal
  65. 65. Staff - Not believing victim </li></ul>
  66. 66. <ul>REPORTING </ul><ul><li>YOU ARE NOT ALONE
  67. 67. FOLLOW PROCEDURE
  68. 68. MAKE NOTES CLEAR & EXPLICIT (date/time)
  69. 69. KEEP ALL ROUGH NOTES
  70. 70. WRITE UP AS SOON AS POSSIBLE - (Don’t delay treatment) </li></ul><ul>IT IS NOT YOUR JOB TO DIAGNOSE - ONLY REPORT CONCERN OR DISCLOSURE </ul>
  71. 71. <ul>IF IN DOUBT SEEK ADVICE </ul><ul>NO REGRETS … if only... </ul>
  72. 72. <ul>THE MENTAL CAPACITY ACT 2005 </ul>
  73. 73. <ul>THE 5 KEY PRINCIPLES </ul><ul><ul><li>PRESUME CAPACITY
  74. 74. RIGHT OF INDIVIDUALS TO HAVE SUPPORT TO MAKE OWN DECISIONS
  75. 75. INCLUDES UNWISE OR ECCENTRIC DECISIONS
  76. 76. BEST INTERESTS
  77. 77. LEAST RESTRICTIVE INTERVENTION </li></ul></ul>
  78. 78. <ul>WHAT DOES CAPACITY MEAN? </ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The ability to make a decision that affects daily life – such as when to get up, what to wear or whether to go to the doctor when feeling ill – as well as more serious or significant decisions. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>• It also refers to a person’s ability to make a decision that may have legal consequences – for them or others. Examples include agreeing to have medical treatment, buying goods or making a will. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li> (Code of Practice 2007) </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul>“ Capacity is the pivotal issue in balancing the right to autonomy in decision-making and the right to protect from harm” (Lush 2000) </ul>
  79. 79. <ul>HOW WOULD YOU KNOW IF A PATIENT HAS THE CAPACITY TO CONSENT? </ul><ul>T R I C K !! </ul><ul><li>DON’T MAKE ASSUMPTIONS
  80. 80. DON’T STEREOTYPE
  81. 81. DO CHECK
  82. 82. DO QUESTION </li></ul>
  83. 83. <ul>CHECKING & QUESTIONING </ul><ul>To help someone make a decision for themselves, check the following points: </ul><ul><li>Are YOU - Providing relevant information
  84. 84. Are YOU - Communicating in an appropriate way
  85. 85. Are YOU - Making the person feel at ease
  86. 86. Are YOU - Supporting the person </li></ul><ul>YOU NEED TO BE ABLE TO DEMONSTRATE YOU HAVE TRIED ALL REASONABLE MEANS TO AID UNDERSTANDING </ul>
  87. 87. <ul>PROTECTING THEIR RIGHTS </ul><ul>* Best Interests - at all times - ( emergency ) * Communicate with patient not carer * ALWAYS assume capacity - but check! * If they lack capacity to make decisions - ask about their - Independent Mental Capacity Advocate (IMCA) * Family, Carer, Power of Attorney </ul>
  88. 88. <ul>IF THEY SAY NO </ul><ul>As long as they have “capacity” they have the right - otherwise they need support to help make decisions eg; Family, IMCA, Power of Attorney </ul>
  89. 89. <ul>IF THEY SAY YES </ul><ul>As long as they have “capacity” they have the right - otherwise they need support to help make decisions eg; Family, IMCA, Power of Attorney </ul>
  90. 90. <ul>CONCERNS ABOUT SOMEONE’S CAPACITY </ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>ASSESSING CAPACITY - 2 STAGE TEST </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul>1) Does the person have an impairment of the mind or brain, or is there some sort of disturbance affecting the way their mind or brain works? (It doesn’t matter whether the impairment or disturbance is temporary or permanent.) 2) If so, does that impairment or disturbance mean that the person is unable to make the decision in question at the time it needs to be made? </ul>
  91. 91. <ul>CONCERNS ABOUT SOMEONE’S CAPACITY </ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>ASSESSING ABILITY TO MAKE A DECISION </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Use communication / checking </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>ASSESSING CAPACITY TO MAKE MORE COMPLEX OR SERIOUS DECISIONS
  92. 92. • Is there a need for a more thorough assessment (perhaps by involving a doctor or other professional expert)? </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  93. 93. <ul>SUPPORT & ADVICE </ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Department of Health
  94. 94. Publishes guidance for healthcare and social care staff in England.
  95. 95. Key publications referenced in the Code include: </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul>0n using restraint with people with learning disabilities and autistic spectrum disorder, see Guidance for restrictive physical interventions www.dh.gov.uk/assetRoot/04/06/84/61/04068461.pdf On adult protection procedures, see No secrets: Guidance on developing and implementing multi-agency policies and procedures to protect vulnerable adults from abuse www.dh.gov.uk/assetRoot/04/07/45/44/04074544.pdf On consent to examination and treatment , including advance decisions to refuse treatment www.dh/gov.uk/consent On the proposed Bournewood safeguards , a draft illustrative Code of Practice - www.dh.gov.uk/assetRoot/04/14/17/64/04141764.pdf On IMCAs and the IMCA pilots www.dh.gov.uk/imca </ul>
  96. 96. <ul>QUESTIONS </ul><ul>THANK YOU </ul>

×