Presentation to Admissions staff on the Global Citizenship Program

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Now that a new general education program has been approved, we begin implementation. This presentation reviews the genesis and rationale of the program, the program structure and content, and the implementation process -- all in terms relevant to prospective students and those who interact with them in the admissions process

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Presentation to Admissions staff on the Global Citizenship Program

  1. 1. The Global Citizenship Program of general education<br />
  2. 2.
  3. 3. What makes a good life?<br />Dave Pollard: How to Save the World<br />http://blogs.salon.com/0002007/<br />http://howtosavetheworld.ca/<br />
  4. 4. Meaningful work and fulfillment<br />
  5. 5. General Education revision began in 2009<br />
  6. 6. Three things converged:<br />New University mission statement<br />HLC Visit and Report: “Improve assessment practices.”<br />Presidential search: Significant changes ahead.<br />
  7. 7. (Old) Mission Statement<br />Mission & Values<br />Although the Sisters of Loretto no longer oversee the day-to-day operation of Webster University, the general mission they established when they founded the university remains unchanged — to satisfy unmet educational needs.<br />Webster today operates as an independent, comprehensive, non-demominational university with campus locations around the world. It offers undergraduate and graduate programs in a wide array of disciplines, including the liberal arts, fine and performing arts, teacher education, business and management.<br />In striving to fulfill educational needs that may be underserved, Webster University:<br /> * Creates a student-centered environment accessible to individuals of diverse ages, cultures and socioeconomic backgrounds.<br /> * Sustains a personalized approach to education through small classes and close relationships among faculty and students.<br /> * Develops educational programs that join theory and practice, and instill in students the spirit of systematic inquiry.<br /> * Encourages creativity, scholarship and individual enterprise in its students and faculty.<br /> * Promotes international perspectives in the curriculum and among students and faculty.<br /> * Encourages in its students a critical perspective, a respect for diversity and an understanding of their own and others’ values.<br /> * Fosters in its students a lifelong desire to learn and a commitment to contribute actively to their communities and the world.<br /> * Educates diverse populations locally, regionally, nationally and internationally.<br /> * Strengthens the communities it serves through support of civic, cultural, corporate and educational organizations.<br />
  8. 8. 2007-2008 Strategic Planning<br />Mission Statement<br />Strategic Plan<br />Planning Process and Institutional Planning Committee<br />
  9. 9.
  10. 10.
  11. 11. 2008: Self-study process for reaccreditation completed<br />Higher Learning Commission Visit<br />Higher Learning Commission -- 10-year reaccreditation<br />General Education – criterion met, assessment needs attention<br />
  12. 12. 2008-2009: Presidential Search<br />Summer 2009<br />Dr. Elizabeth (Beth) Stroble joins <br />Webster University as our <br />11th President<br />
  13. 13. February 2009:<br />Webster submits proposal to the Association of American Colleges & Universities for a team to attend the summer Institute on General Education and Assessment<br />
  14. 14.
  15. 15. Arrow Process<br />The General Education Reform Process<br />Why use graphics from PowerPointing.com?<br />What do we want for students?<br />“transform students for global citizenship and individual excellence”<br />What students experience<br />Program Design; Assessment Plan<br />University Mission<br />Learning Goals & Outcomes<br /> Program Content<br />Program Mission<br />“core competencies for responsible global citizenship in the 21st century”<br />Purposeful pathways and a plan for telling whether they work<br />
  16. 16.
  17. 17. Mission, charge<br />The mission of the Global Citizenship Program is to ensure that every undergraduate student emerge from Webster University with the core competencies required for responsible global citizenship in the 21st Century.<br />The Global Citizenship Project Task Force is charged with making recommendations to the Senate for the creation and implementation of the Global Citizenship Program.<br />
  18. 18. Global Citizenship Project Task Force Charge<br />The GCPTF shall be consultative and transparent in its processes and report monthly to the Senate. <br />The GCPTF shall identify the core competencies of global citizenship.<br />The GCPTF shall identify best practices in assessment of general education.<br />The GCPTF shall explore multiple models of general education program.<br />The GCPTF shall explore best practices in general education which may include but is not limited to learning communities, paired classes, e-portfolios and co-curricular experiences.<br />The GCPTF shall identify examples of best practices that currently exist within our curriculum.<br />The GCPTF shall request of the Senate additional resources and/or support as the need arises, including changes in the membership of the GCPTF.<br />The GCPTF shall strive have a plan ready for approval of the Faculty Assembly by Spring 2010.<br />The GCPTF shall work through the academic year 2010-2011 to build out the GCP.<br />The GCPTF shall be dissolved once the Global Citizenship Program is implemented. It is expected ha undergraduate students entering Webster University in Fall 2011 will be required to fulfill the GCP. <br />
  19. 19. Global Citizenship Project Task Force<br />Bruce Umbaugh, Director<br />Stephanie Schroeder, Assessment Director<br />Gary Glasgow, LGCFA<br />Kit Jenkins, SOC<br />Paula Hanssen, CAS<br />Chris Risker, SBT<br />Vicki McMullin, SOE<br />Gary Kannenberg, Gen Ed Coordinator<br />Kate Parsons, Interdisciplinary Programs<br />Donna Campbell, International Studies<br />John Aleshunas, Curriculum Committee<br />Ron Daniel, Geneva Academic Director<br />Larry Baden, Freshman Seminars<br />Robin Assner, Freshman Seminars<br />John Watson, General Studies<br />Benjamin O. Akande, Dean<br />Debra Carpenter, Dean<br />Brenda Fyfe, Dean<br />Peter Sargent, Dean<br />David Carl Wilson, Dean<br />Emily Bahr, Student<br />Ted Hoef, Dean of Students<br />Kim Kleinman, Undergraduate Advising<br />Sarah Tetley, First-year Experience<br />
  20. 20. Things we learned<br />
  21. 21. Reform is often undertaken in piecemeal and occasional fashion, rather than as a systemic, coordinated, and sustained effort.<br />
  22. 22. Piecemeal reform efforts include:<br /><ul><li>Freshman Seminar
  23. 23. MEDC/SOC Gen Ed
  24. 24. NEH Ethics Across the Curriculum
  25. 25. Title VI Language Across the Curriculum
  26. 26. Title III Teaching with Technology
  27. 27. Learning Communities: Pathways (undeclared), Biology, Communications, Fine Arts
  28. 28. Writing Across the Curriculum/Writing Intensive Courses
  29. 29. World Traveler
  30. 30. International Distinction
  31. 31. Webster Works Worldwide
  32. 32. Webster LEADS</li></li></ul><li>
  33. 33. Learning outcomes<br />
  34. 34. Distribution requirements only is now unusual in General Education:<br />Source: “Trends and Emerging Practices in General Education,” Hart Research Associates for AAC&U, May, 2009<br />
  35. 35. UNDERGRADUATE EXPERIENCE<br />GEN ED<br />How do these (all) integrate?<br />How do these (all) complement and align?<br />MAJOR<br />CO-CURRICULUM<br />
  36. 36. High Impact Practices<br />First-Year Seminars and Experiences<br />Common Intellectual Experiences<br />Learning Communities<br />Writing-Intensive Courses<br />Collaborative Assignments and Projects<br />“Science as Science Is Done”/Undergraduate Research<br />Diversity/Global Learning<br />Service Learning, Community-Based Learning<br />Internships<br />Capstone Courses and Projects<br />
  37. 37. High-impact practices are good for students:<br />
  38. 38. Impact of Educationally Purposeful Practices on First Academic Year GPA by Pre-College Achievement Level<br />*Source: George Kuh, High Impact Educational Practices: What They Are, Who Has Access to Them, and Why They Matter (AAC&U, 2008) and Carol Geary Schneider, “Helping Students Connect”<br />
  39. 39. Impact of Educationally Purposeful Practices on First Academic Year GPA by Race/Ethnicity<br />Source: George Kuh, High Impact Educational Practices: What They Are, Who Has Access to Them, and Why They Matter (AAC&U, 2008) and Carol Geary Schneider, “Helping Students Connect”<br />
  40. 40. Impact of Educationally Purposeful Practices on the Probability of Returning for the Second Year of College by Race<br />Source: George Kuh, High Impact Educational Practices: What They Are, Who Has Access to Them, and Why They Matter (AAC&U, 2008) and Carol Geary Schneider, “Helping Students Connect”<br />
  41. 41. Students are often instrumental and <br />extrinsically motivated about their education.<br />
  42. 42. From The New Yorker Collection.<br />Used by permission.<br />
  43. 43. Question: Why must I learn ____ ?Answer: Global Citizenship Program Competencies are the Gateway to Career Success and Earning Power<br />
  44. 44. GCP Competencies are the Gateway to Career Success and Earning Power<br />“Irrespective of college major or institutional selectivity, what matters to career success is students’ development of a broad set of cross-cutting capacities…”<br />Anthony Carnevale, Georgetown University<br />Center on Education and the Workforce<br />
  45. 45. US Economy Defined by Greater Workplace Challenges and Dynamism<br /><ul><li>Every year, more than 1/3 of the entire US labor force changes jobs.
  46. 46. Today's Students Will Have 10-14 Jobs by the Time They Are 38.
  47. 47. 50% of Workers Have Been With Their Company Less Than 5 Years.
  48. 48. Every year, more than 30 million Americans are working in jobs that did not exist in the previous quarter. </li></ul>Department of Labor – Bureau of Labor Statistics<br />
  49. 49. Employers want to employ people<br />with the knowledge and skills that are <br />in the GCP:<br />
  50. 50. Things we learned<br />Raising the Bar: Employers’ Views on College Learning in the Wake of the Economic Downturn,<br />Hart Research Associates, for the AAC&U, January, 2010<br />
  51. 51. Employers Expect More<br />91% of employers say that they are “asking employees to take on more responsibilities and to use a broader set of skills than in the past”<br />90% of employers say that their “employees are expected to work harder to coordinate with other departments than in the past.”<br />88% of employers say that “the challenges their employees face are more complex than they were in the past.”<br />88% of employers agree that “to succeed in their companies, employees need higher levels of learning and knowledge than they did in the past”<br />Source: “Raising the Bar: Employers’ Views on College Learning in the <br />Wake of the Economic Downturn” (AAC&U and Hart Research Associates, 2010)<br />
  52. 52. Global Citizenship Programskills pay better<br />
  53. 53. The Growing Demand for Higher Order Skills<br />Source: Council on Competitiveness, Competitiveness Index<br />41<br />
  54. 54. What Employers Say<br />“[Employers] generally are...frustrated with their inability to find ‘360 degree people’ who have both the specific job/technical skills and the broader skills (communication and problem-solving skills, work ethic, and ability to work with others) necessary to promise greater success for both the individual and the employer.”<br />Source: Peter D. Hart Research Associates, Report of Findings <br />Based on Focus Groups Among Business Executives (AAC&U, 2006)<br />
  55. 55. Balance of Broad Knowledgeand Specific Skills Preferred<br />Which is more important for recent college graduates who want to pursue advancement and long-term career success at your company? <br />Broad range of skills and knowledge that apply to a range of fields or positions<br />In-depth knowledge and skills that apply to a specific field or position<br />BOTH in-depth AND broad range of skills and knowledge<br />“Raising the Bar: Employers’  Views on College Learning in the Wake of the Economic Downturn” (AAC&U and Hart Research Assoc. 2010)<br />
  56. 56. What Employers Say<br />“My company lives and dies on our ability to innovate and to create the new products and processes that give us an edge in this very competitive global economy. ESCO needs people who have both a command of certain specific skills and robust problem-solving and communication skills.”<br /> Steven Pratt, CEO, ESCO Corp. and Chair of the Oregon Business Council<br />
  57. 57. Wage Premium for GCP Learning Outcomes<br /> From a federal database analyzing qualifications for 1,100 different jobs, there is consistent evidence that the highest salaries apply to positions that call for intensive use of liberal education capabilities, including (random order):<br /><ul><li>Writing
  58. 58. Inductive and Deductive Reasoning
  59. 59. Judgment and Decision Making
  60. 60. Problem Solving
  61. 61. Social/Interpersonal Skills
  62. 62. Mathematics
  63. 63. Originality</li></ul>Source: Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce<br />
  64. 64. Mean Earnings of Jobs that Emphasize Writing<br />Source: Georgetown University Center for Education and the Workforce<br />
  65. 65. Mean Earnings of Jobs that Emphasize Speaking<br />Source: Georgetown University Center for Education and the Workforce<br />
  66. 66. Mean Earnings of Jobs that EmphasizeJudgment & Decision Making<br />Source: Georgetown University Center for Education and the Workforce<br />
  67. 67. Mean Earnings of Jobs that EmphasizeProblem Solving<br />Source: Georgetown University Center for Education and the Workforce<br />
  68. 68. GCP and Career Success<br /> Students should make sure their college education will help them develop these capabilities because the marketplace rewards graduates with the highest levels of achievement in these key learning outcomes.<br /> Moreover, students who lack the hallmarks of a liberal education will not gain access to career paths that require and further develop these high level capabilities.<br />Source: Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce<br />
  69. 69. But:<br />Is there room for developing those skills, given the demands of the various majors?<br />
  70. 70. Core Requirements:Pacific Lutheran University’s Study<br />
  71. 71. Core Requirements:compared to outgoing WU gen ed<br />^ SOC 28%<br />^ 9 areas, 21%<br />^ BFA, etc., 12.5%<br />
  72. 72. Core Requirements:compared to Global Citizenship Program<br />^ GCP, 23.5%<br />
  73. 73. Product<br />Learning outcomes <br />Program structure <br />Program content ☐<br />
  74. 74. May, 2011<br />Arrow Process<br />The General Education Reform Process<br />Why use graphics from PowerPointing.com?<br />You are here.<br />“transform students for global citizenship and individual excellence”<br />What students experience<br />Program Design; Assessment Plan<br />Learning Goals & Outcomes<br />University Mission<br /> Program Content<br />Program Mission<br />“core competencies for responsible global citizenship in the 21st century”<br />Purposeful pathways and a plan for telling whether they work<br />
  75. 75. Understanding the Global Citizenship Program of general education<br />
  76. 76. PurposefulPathways: A begining, middle, and end<br />First-year seminar introduces program, emphasizes critical thinking, interdisciplinarity, integration<br />1<br />Courses address knowledge, communication, critical thinking, ethical reasoning, global understanding, intercultural competence, integrative thinking<br />2<br />Global Keystone Seminar serves as capstone course for the Global Citizenship Program of general education<br />3<br />
  77. 77. Knowledge of human cultures and the physical and natural world,Roots of Cultures<br />Social Systems & Human Behavior<br />Physical & Natural World<br />Global Understanding<br />Arts Appreciation<br />Intellectual and practical skills,<br />Critical Thinking<br />Written and Oral Communication<br />Quantitative Literacy<br />These skills should be practiced across the curriculum, not only in the Global Citizenship Program, with the challenge of projects, problems, and standards for performance increasing through the course of students' educations.<br />Understanding of personal and social responsibility,<br />Intercultural Knowledge and Competence<br />Ethical Reasoning <br />This understanding should be fostered through active learning and engagement with diverse communities and real-world challenges.<br />Abilities to integrate and apply what is learned.<br />Demonstrated through the application of knowledge, skills, and responsibilities to new settings and complex problems.<br />
  78. 78. Program Requirements (Native/Four-year Students)<br />Eight other courses<br />Two seminars<br />Roots of Cultures (two)<br />Social Systems & Human Behavior (two)<br />Physical & Natural World<br />Global Understanding<br />Arts Appreciation<br />Quantitative Literacy<br />Great Thinkers (1st year) <br />Global Keystone (3rd year)<br />Emphasize integration, lifelong learning<br />Collection points for student work for assessment<br />Also address Written and Oral Communication, <br />Critical Thinking, Ethical Reasoning, and Intercultural Competence<br />
  79. 79. Program Requirements (Transfer Students)<br />Other courses and skills, at Webster or transferred, or A.A. degree<br />Two integrative<br />Roots of Cultures (two)<br />Social Systems & Human Behavior (two)<br />Physical & Natural World<br />Global Understanding<br />Arts Appreciation<br />Quantitative Literacy<br />One integrative/applied course <br />Global Keystone Seminar<br />Emphasize integration, lifelong learning<br />Collection points for student work for assessment<br />Also address Written and Oral Communication, <br />Critical Thinking, Ethical Reasoning, and Intercultural Competence<br />
  80. 80.
  81. 81. GCP Committee work now underway<br />Developing assessment rubrics<br />Preparing guidance for academic departments<br />Meetings with Admissions, Registrar, and so on<br />Robin Assner briefing European campuses<br />Planning summer “Collaboratory”<br />Course-coding begins in Fall<br />Coded courses will guide articulation and transfer planning<br />
  82. 82. The mission of the Global Citizenship Program <br />to ensure that every undergraduate student <br />emerge from Webster University with the <br />core competencies required for <br />responsible global citizenship in the 21st Century.<br />
  83. 83. GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP PUZZLE<br />Knowledge<br />Roots of Cultures<br />Social Systems & Human Behavior<br />Physical & Natural World<br />Global Understanding<br />Arts Appreciation<br />Skills<br />Written Communication<br />Oral Communication<br />Critical Thinking<br />Quantitative Literacy<br />Ethical Reasoning<br />Intercultural Competence<br />Integrative Learning<br />
  84. 84. Bruce Umbaugh<br />bumbaugh@webster.edu<br />Stephanie Schroeder<br />schroeds@webster.edu<br />2011<br />2018<br />2015<br />2014<br />2012<br />2011<br />2010<br />2009<br />2013<br />2016<br />2017<br />Develop, adopt<br />Transfers in GCP (under 75 hours)<br />Everybody in GCP<br />First class bound by GCP requirements<br />Graduates!<br />Build, implement<br />

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