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Global Citizenship Project Task Force Report to the Faculty Assembly, November 10, 2009
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Global Citizenship Project Task Force Report to the Faculty Assembly, November 10, 2009

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This is a report from the group formulating a new general education program for Webster University undergraduate students. It summarizes some University history, including the origins of general ...

This is a report from the group formulating a new general education program for Webster University undergraduate students. It summarizes some University history, including the origins of general education and the language of global citizenship. It reviews some of what the Task Force has learned about current best practices in undergraduate education, recommends program learning outcomes, and sketches the Task Force's intentions going forward.

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Global Citizenship Project Task Force Report to the Faculty Assembly, November 10, 2009 Global Citizenship Project Task Force Report to the Faculty Assembly, November 10, 2009 Presentation Transcript

  • Global Citizenship Project Task Force Report to the Faculty Assembly Bruce Umbaugh, Director November 10, 2009
  • The Wabac Machine
  • How we got here Where “here” is Where we’re going
    • Webster University
    • General Education
    • Global Citizenship
    • This process
  • 1967 1962 1924 1915 1972 KC 2011 Loretto College Webster College Men admitted Secular 1931 Study abroad
  • 2003 1983 1978 1992: Gen Ed 2004 Geneva Webster University London Strategic Plan 1986 Leiden 1981 Vienna World Traveler
  • General Education Prior to 1994: 128 hours and a major -- no general degree requirements Sept. 11, 1990 FCA Meeting. Sr. Mary Mangan, Anna Barbra Sakurai, Jim Staley, Maggie Droste, "General Degree Requirements” Fall Faculty Institute, Sept. 14-5, 1990. President Perlman: "While I want to be a participant and leader in these deliberations, I defer to the faculty's wisdom and judgment in the matter of general education and am prepared to be your enthusiastic spokesperson regardless of the outcome. "Indeed, I agree with Derek Bok, the President of Harvard, when he said that there is no single best curriculum, and the primary value of reconsidering or changing the curriculum is to engender support and enthusiasm for the new curriculum.” Task Forces formed: student development and skill areas, breadth, commonality.
  • October 9, 1990 FCA Meeting: Proposal for Freshman Seminar. Oct. 30, 1990 "Core Curriculum Forum" organized by Students for Social Action and Council for Student Affairs April 10, 1992 Spring Institute with Richard Light, organized by Susan Hacker, Brenda Boyce, Sharon Lee, Susan Heady, and Mustapha Pasha Oct. 13, 1992 FCA Meeting Curriculum Committee moved the General Education proposal, which carried by an overwhelming margin. BA students need 3 hours in each of nine areas; others need 3 hours in each of four of the nine areas. Curriculum Committee can exempt programs. Departments code courses.
  • Oct. 22, "FCA Approves New Education Model," by April Howell (Journal, p. 1) notes that the faculty has been discussing general degree requirements since 1985. FEC Chair Dottie Marshall notes that Curriculum Committee will "clean up language" of the goals. Fred Stopsky is quoted calling the new program a bureaucratic endeavor that doesn't improve teaching. Dec. 7, 1993 FCA votes that BS shall have same General Education Requirements as BA.
    • Webster University Journal support:
    • Sept. 20, 1990 "Degree Requirements Needed”
    • Sept. 24, 1992 "WU Short on Necessary Requirements"
  • Strategic Planning and “Global Citizenship”
  • (Old) Mission Statement Mission & Values Although the Sisters of Loretto no longer oversee the day-to-day operation of Webster University, the general mission they established when they founded the university remains unchanged — to satisfy unmet educational needs. Webster today operates as an independent, comprehensive, non-demominational university with campus locations around the world. It offers undergraduate and graduate programs in a wide array of disciplines, including the liberal arts, fine and performing arts, teacher education, business and management. In striving to fulfill educational needs that may be underserved, Webster University: * Creates a student-centered environment accessible to individuals of diverse ages, cultures and socioeconomic backgrounds. * Sustains a personalized approach to education through small classes and close relationships among faculty and students. * Develops educational programs that join theory and practice, and instill in students the spirit of systematic inquiry. * Encourages creativity, scholarship and individual enterprise in its students and faculty. * Promotes international perspectives in the curriculum and among students and faculty. * Encourages in its students a critical perspective, a respect for diversity and an understanding of their own and others’ values. * Fosters in its students a lifelong desire to learn and a commitment to contribute actively to their communities and the world. * Educates diverse populations locally, regionally, nationally and internationally. * Strengthens the communities it serves through support of civic, cultural, corporate and educational organizations.
  • 2000-2002 Strategic Planning New Strategic Plan Art Sandler, Faculty President James Brasfield and Bruce Umbaugh, faculty representatives John Robinson, facilitator
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  • 2007 Strategic Planning Faculty representatives: Bill Lynch, Steve Hinson, Gwyneth Williams Mission Statement Strategic Plan Planning Process and Institutional Planning Committee
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  • 2008: Self-study process for reaccreditation completed Higher Learning Commission Visit Higher Learning Commission -- 10-year reaccreditation
  • Spring 2009: Webster submits proposal to AAC&U for a team to attend the Institute on General Education and Assessment
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  • Distribution requirements only is now unusual in General Education: Source: “Trends and Emerging Practices in General Education,” Hart Research Associates for AAC&U, May, 2009
  • High Impact Practices
    • First-Year Seminars and Experiences
    • C ommon Intellectual Experiences
    • Learning Communities
    • Writing-Intensive Courses
    • Collaborative Assignments and Projects
    • “ S cience as Science Is Done” / Undergraduate Research
    • Diversity/Global Learning
    • Service Learning, Community-Based Learning
    • Internships
    • Capstone Courses and Projects
  • Impact of Educationally Purposeful Practices on First Academic Year GPA by Pre-College Achievement Level *Source: George Kuh , High Impact Educational Practices: What They Are, Who Has Access to Them, and Why They Matter (AAC&U, 2008) and Carol Geary Schneider, “Helping Students Connect”
  • Impact of Educationally Purposeful Practices on First Academic Year GPA by Race/Ethnicity *Source: George Kuh , High Impact Educational Practices: What They Are, Who Has Access to Them, and Why They Matter (AAC&U, 2008) and Carol Geary Schneider, “Helping Students Connect”
  • Impact of Educationally Purposeful Practices on the Probability of Returning for the Second Year of College by Race *Source: George Kuh , High Impact Educational Practices: What They Are, Who Has Access to Them, and Why They Matter (AAC&U, 2008) and Carol Geary Schneider, “Helping Students Connect”
  • Arrow Process Why use graphics from PowerPointing.com? Program Design; Assessment Plan “ transform students for global citizenship and individual excellence” What do we want for students? What students experience “ core competencies for responsible global citizenship in the 21st century” Purposeful pathways and a plan for telling whether they work Learning Goals & Outcomes Program Content Program Mission University Mission The General Education Reform Process
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  • Mission, charge The mission of the Global Citizenship Program is to ensure that every undergraduate student emerge from Webster University with the core competencies required for responsible global citizenship in the 21st Century. The Global Citizenship Project Task Force is charged with making recommendations to the Senate for the creation and implementation of the Global Citizenship Program.
  • Global Citizenship Project Task Force Charge
    • The GCPTF shall be consultative and transparent in its processes and report monthly to the Senate.
    • The GCPTF shall identify the core competencies of global citizenship.
    • The GCPTF shall identify best practices in assessment of general education.
    • The GCPTF shall explore multiple models of general education program.
    • The GCPTF shall explore best practices in general education which may include but is not limited to learning communities, paired classes, e-portfolios and co-curricular experiences.
    • The GCPTF shall identify examples of best practices that currently exist within our curriculum.
    • The GCPTF shall request of the Senate additional resources and/or support as the need arises, including changes in the membership of the GCPTF.
    • The GCPTF shall strive have a plan ready for approval of the Faculty Assembly by Spring 2010.
    • The GCPTF shall work through the academic year 2010-2011 to build out the GCP.
    • The GCPTF shall be dissolved once the Global Citizenship Program is implemented. It is expected ha undergraduate students entering Webster University in Fall 2011 will be required to fulfill the GCP.
  • Global Citizenship Project Task Force
    • Bruce Umbaugh, Director
    • Stephanie Schroeder, Assessment Director
    • Gary Glasgow, LGCFA
    • Kit Jenkins, SOC
    • Paula Hanssen, CAS
    • Chris Risker, SBT
    • Vicki McMullin, SOE
    • Gary Kannenberg, Gen Ed Coordinator
    • Kate Parsons, Interdisciplinary Programs
    • Donna Campbell, International Studies
    • John Aleshunas, Curriculum Committee
    • Larry Baden, Freshman Seminars
    • John Watson, General Studies
    • Benjamin O. Akande, Dean
    • Debra Carpenter, Dean
    • Brenda Fyfe, Dean
    • Peter Sargent, Dean
    • David Carl Wilson, Dean
    • Emily Bahr, Student
    • Ted Hoef, Dean of Students
    • Kim Kleinman, Undergraduate Advising
    • (Ron Daniel, Geneva Academic Director)
  • Consultative and Transparent
    • Three Coffees
    • Two lunches
    • Numerous meetings w/ individual faculty
    • 43% non-admin, f-t faculty
    • One Brown Bag presentation
    • Total attendance = 140
    • wiki.webster.edu
    • SGA Executive Board
    • Journal story
    • Senate reports
    • Assembly meeting today
    Journal Photo by Theo Welling
  • Large, varied array of courses Limited number of carefully constructed courses Any course at any time Developmental model Academic class experience only Involve complete undergraduate experience How should learning be organized to achieve the outcomes? Basic design choices:
  • Large, varied array of courses Limited number of carefully constructed courses Any course at any time Developmental model Academic class experience only Involve complete undergraduate experience Basic design choices:
  • Large, varied array of courses Limited number of carefully constructed courses Any course at any time Developmental model Academic class experience only Involve complete undergraduate experience How should learning be organized to achieve the outcomes? ? ? ?
  • Core Requirements: PLU’s Study
  • Core Requirements: Webster in Context SOC Nine Areas BFA
    • Freshman Seminar
    • COMM Gen Ed
    • NEH Ethics Across the Curriculum
    • Title VI Language Across the Curriculum
    • Title III Teaching with Technology
    • Learning Communities: Pathways (undeclared), Biology, Communications, Fine Arts
    • Writing Across the Curriculum/Writing Intensive Courses
    • World Traveler
    • International Distinction
    • WWW
    • Webster LEADS
    Piecemeal reform efforts include:
  • High Impact Practices Survey now underway . . . .
  • Arrow Process Why use graphics from PowerPointing.com? Program Design; Assessment Plan “ transform students for global citizenship and individual excellence” You are here. What students experience “ core competencies for responsible global citizenship in the 21st century” Purposeful pathways and a plan for telling whether they work Learning Goals & Outcomes Program Content Program Mission University Mission The General Education Reform Process
  • Content/Structure recommendations The Task Force has concluded that the "core competencies required for responsible global citizenship in the 21st century" are reflected in the AAC&U/LEAP Essential Learning Outcomes. We take seriously concerns that have been voiced about the need to have a sufficiently simple programmatic structure that administering and assessing the program are not hindered.
  • The Task Force, therefore, recommends that, so long as an adequate assessment plan can be formulated, Webster University adopt the following goals for all undergraduate students, and proposes to move forward to develop an educational program to achieve such outcomes, along with a means of assessing that program:
  • The Task Force, therefore, recommends that, so long as an adequate assessment plan can be formulated, Webster University adopt the following goals for all undergraduate students, and proposes to move forward to develop an educational program to achieve such outcomes, along with a means of assessing that program:
    • Knowledge of human cultures and the physical and natural world , achieved through study drawing upon the resources of traditional disciplines, focused by engagement with the "big questions," both contemporary and enduring
    • Intellectual and practical skills , including inquiry and analysis, creative and critical thinking, written and oral communication, quantitative literacy, information literacy, teamwork, and problem solving. These skills should be practiced across the curriculum, not only in the Global Citizenship Program, with the challenge of projects, problems, and standards for performance increasing through the course of students' educations.
    • Understanding of personal and social responsibility , including civic knowledge and engagement, intercultural knowledge and competence, ethical reasoning and action, and foundations and skills for lifelong learning. This understanding should be fostered through active learning and engagement with diverse communities and real-world challenges.
    • Abilities to integrate and apply what is learned . These abilities should be demonstrated through the application of knowledge, skills, and responsibilities to new settings and complex problems.
  • As the assessment plan takes shape, the Task Force may suggest the addition of a specific outcome in the area of international understanding or global awareness, beyond what is already referenced above. Our intention is that the same set of goals should apply to all undergraduate, degree-seeking students. We further intend that no undergraduate program be compromised or disadvantaged by the Global Citizenship Program. To promote achieving the objectives of integration and application, we intend for the new program be interdisciplinary from the first year of study. We further intend to build upon those practices identified in research as being "high-impact" in structuring the program.
  • 2015 2010 2009 2007 2006 2005 2004 2008 2011 Develop, adopt Centennial class Build, implement
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