General Education Reform: Process, Product, and Prospects

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This is a presentation to the faculty from the group formulating a new general education program for Webster University undergraduate students. It reviews the open and transparent process, things that …

This is a presentation to the faculty from the group formulating a new general education program for Webster University undergraduate students. It reviews the open and transparent process, things that the Task Force has learned from its research and from communicating with the community, and presents the Task Force's recommendations on program outcomes and developmental structure.

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  • 1. General Education Reform: Process, Product, and Prospects Spring Faculty Institute Bruce Umbaugh Stephanie Schroeder and members of the Global Citizenship Project Task Force
  • 2. Process
  • 3. Arrow Process Why use graphics from PowerPointing.com? Program Design; Assessment Plan “ transform students for global citizenship and individual excellence” You are here. What students experience “ core competencies for responsible global citizenship in the 21st century” Purposeful pathways and a plan for telling whether they work Learning Goals & Outcomes Program Content Program Mission University Mission The General Education Reform Process March, 2010
  • 4. Arrow Process Why use graphics from PowerPointing.com? Program Design; Assessment Plan “ transform students for global citizenship and individual excellence” You are here. What students experience “ core competencies for responsible global citizenship in the 21st century” Purposeful pathways and a plan for telling whether they work Learning Goals & Outcomes Program Content Program Mission University Mission The General Education Reform Process March, 2010
  • 5. Arrow Process Why use graphics from PowerPointing.com? Program Design; Assessment Plan “ transform students for global citizenship and individual excellence” You are here. What students experience “ core competencies for responsible global citizenship in the 21st century” Purposeful pathways and a plan for telling whether they work Learning Goals & Outcomes Program Content Program Mission University Mission The General Education Reform Process March, 2010
  • 6. Arrow Process Why use graphics from PowerPointing.com? Program Design; Assessment Plan “ transform students for global citizenship and individual excellence” You are here. What students experience “ core competencies for responsible global citizenship in the 21st century” Purposeful pathways and a plan for telling whether they work Learning Goals & Outcomes Program Content Program Mission University Mission The General Education Reform Process March, 2010
  • 7. Process
    • Spring, 2009
      • Faculty Senate announces a task force will begin the reform process
      • Team attends Institute on General Education (Bill Lynch, Stephanie Schroeder, Bruce Umbaugh)
      • Senate charges Global Citizenship Project Task Force (June, 2009)
  • 8. Process
    • Summer, 2009
      • Task Force meetings begin
        • (Members, as of March, 2010: Bruce Umbaugh, Stephanie Schroeder, John Aleshunas, Robin Assner, Larry Baden, Donna Campbell, Gary Glasgow, Paula Hanssen, Kit Jenkins, Gary Kannenberg, Vicki McMullin, Kate Parsons, Chris Risker, John Watson, Benjamin Akande, Debra Carpenter, Brenda Fyfe, Peter Sargent, David Wilson, Ted Hoef, Ron Daniel, Kim Kleinman, Emily Bahr)
      • Center for International Education retreat on interdisciplinarity
      • First Global Citizenship Coffee (August, 2009)
  • 9. Fall, 2009
    • Six coffees and lunches, in all
    • Discussion with SGA Executive Board
    • Global Citizenship Project Task Force wiki begun
    • Session with extended campus and international academic directors
    Journal Photo by Theo Welling
  • 10. Fall, 2009
    • Team attends Integrative Learning conference (Larry Baden, Gary Glasgow, Ted Hoef, Scott Jensen, Ralph Olliges, Mary Preuss, Stephanie Schroeder, Bruce Umbaugh)
    • GCPTF recommends program learning outcomes (November)
    • Faculty Assembly (November)
    • Assembly presentation online (November)
  • 11. Process (cont.)
    • Four stories (so far) in the Webster Journal (Fall and Spring)
  • 12. Winter
    • Four open sessions on possible program components; three with soup (January-February, 2010)
    • Team attends General Education and Assessment conference (Robin Assner, Ron Daniel, Paula Hanssen, Dan Hellinger, Kim Kleinman, Danielle McCartney, Kate Parsons, Amanda Rosen, Stephanie Schroeder, Sara Tetley, Bruce Umbaugh, John Watson)
    • Reports online from conference attendees (February-March)
  • 13. Winter
    • Circulation of GCPTF White Papers on possible program components, via wiki and e-mail links
    • Application to Greater Expectations Institute for summer work on developing and implementing Global Citizenship Program
    • Discussion with Faculty Senate
  • 14. Spring
    • Discussion with Vice President and Associate Vice Presidents for Academic Affairs and academic Deans (March)
    • Spring Faculty Institute (March)
    • Upcoming:
      • Task Force refines, elaborates recommendations
      • Discussion with Curriculum Committee
      • Further discussion with Senate
      • Faculty Assembly
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/miikas/141434315/ Some Rights Reserved: CC-By-SA 2.0
  • 15. Process
    • More than 300 attendees at coffee, lunch, soup, etc.
    • All schools and colleges represented
    • More than 230 views on Faculty Assembly Slide show
    • More than 700 views of Global Citizenship Project wiki
    • More individual meetings and e-mail than we counted
  • 16. Things we learned
  • 17. Things we learned
  • 18. Things we learned Because they are general, the skills that are general education outcomes should be addressed throughout students’ education, not only in the general education program. There are many pathways to get to the goals.
  • 19. High Impact Practices
    • First-Year Seminars and Experiences 
    • Common Intellectual Experiences
    • Learning Communities
    • Writing-Intensive Courses
    • Collaborative Assignments and Projects
    • “ Science as Science Is Done”/Undergraduate Research
    • Diversity/Global Learning
    • Service Learning, Community-Based Learning
    • Internships
    • Capstone Courses and Projects
    Carol Geary Schneider, AAC&U General Education Institute, Minneapolis, MN June, 2009
  • 20. Things we learned
    • General Education best practices focus on how as well as what.
    • Do we ask students to work in ways that
      • Have high impact?
      • Will help them to integrate?
      • Prepare them to learn later in life?
      • Prepare them to apply what they learn?
  • 21. From The New Yorker Collection. Used by permission.
  • 22. Things we learned
    • Students improve in all their classes when involved in high-impact practices.
    • Employers pay a wage premium for LEAP learning outcome skills (that is, jobs that require those skills pay better).
  • 23. Things we learned Raising the Bar: Employers’ Views on College Learning in the Wake of the Economic Downturn, Hart Research Associates, for the AAC&U, January, 2010
  • 24. Things we learned
    • We must be able to accommodate articulation agreements with other schools, as well as state requirements for student transfer.
    • We have to be able to include:
      • International campuses
      • Domestic, extended campuses
      • Transfer students
      • Part-time students
      • Evening-only students
      • Students in high-credit-hour programs, including Music Education (142 credit hours), Biotechnology (93), Accounting (75)
      • Students who study abroad
      • Students pursuing minors
  • 25. Things we learned Indoctrination is a worry. Cynicism is a risk. It matters how we present general education, not only what it is.
  • 26. Things we learned Many faculty approve of developing specific, interdisciplinary courses for the Global Citizenship Program. Integrative and collaborative teaching appeal to Webster faculty. Webster faculty care about student writing and have devoted thought and attention to mechanisms for improving it. Service learning appeals to Webster faculty. Experiential elements, for learning, need to include reflection on the activity. We will need faculty development, both here and at extended campuses.
  • 27. Things we learned NSSE data suggest we do well with engagement. Learning communities have been successful at Webster and elsewhere, and they further enhance student engagement. NSSE data suggest we outperform comparison groups with first-year students experiencing active learning. But we measure no differently than comparison schools for seniors.
  • 28. Things we learned Through high school, students experience the “banking model” of education. We need to help them beyond that. High school students feel uninformed about college curriculum and uncertain of its demands. High school students focus on choosing majors, not on learning.
  • 29. Things we learned Because there are multiple pathways to the goals, we could build and require thematic “tracks” in the Global Citizenship Program. BUT This would trade breadth again for depth, and Students change their minds and majors
  • 30. Things we learned Assessment of the Global Citizenship Program should “work backwards,” starting with program outcomes that tell what we expect of students at graduation.
  • 31. Things we learned Assessment of the Global Citizenship Program should be both qualitative and quantitative. Assessment could include “quality of life” questions for alumni. Good assessment allows for program improvement.
  • 32. Things we learned
  • 33. What do students say?
  • 34. (Video plays here.)
  • 35. From process to product Global Citizenship Project Task Force Recommendations
  • 36. Arrow Process Why use graphics from PowerPointing.com? Program Design; Assessment Plan “ transform students for global citizenship and individual excellence” You are here. What students experience “ core competencies for responsible global citizenship in the 21st century” Purposeful pathways and a plan for telling whether they work Learning Goals & Outcomes Program Content Program Mission University Mission The General Education Reform Process March, 2010
  • 37. Arrow Process Why use graphics from PowerPointing.com? Program Design; Assessment Plan “ transform students for global citizenship and individual excellence” You are here. What students experience “ core competencies for responsible global citizenship in the 21st century” Purposeful pathways and a plan for telling whether they work Learning Goals & Outcomes Program Content Program Mission University Mission The General Education Reform Process March, 2010
  • 38. Product
    • Learning outcomes
    • Program structure
    • (Program content)
  • 39. Learning outcomes
  • 40. Abilities to integrate and apply what is learned . These abilities should be demonstrated through the application of knowledge, skills, and responsibilities to new settings and complex problems. Knowledge of human cultures and the physical and natural world , achieved through study drawing upon the resources of traditional disciplines, focused by engagement with the "big questions," both contemporary and enduring Intellectual and practical skills , including inquiry and analysis, creative and critical thinking, written and oral communication, quantitative literacy, information literacy, teamwork, and problem solving. These skills should be practiced across the curriculum, not only in the Global Citizenship Program, with the challenge of projects, problems, and standards for performance increasing through the course of students' educations. Understanding of personal and social responsibility , including civic knowledge and engagement, intercultural knowledge and competence, ethical reasoning and action, and foundations and skills for lifelong learning. This understanding should be fostered through active learning and engagement with diverse communities and real-world challenges.
  • 41. Knowledge of human cultures and the physical and natural world , achieved through study drawing upon the resources of traditional disciplines, focused by engagement with the "big questions," both contemporary and enduring
  • 42.
    • Intellectual and practical skills , including
    • inquiry and analysis,
    • creative and
    • critical thinking,
    • written and
    • oral communication,
    • quantitative literacy,
    • information literacy,
    • teamwork, and
    • problem solving
  • 43.
    • Understanding of personal and social responsibility , including
    • civic knowledge and engagement,
    • intercultural knowledge and competence,
    • ethical reasoning and action, and
    • foundations and skills for lifelong learning.
  • 44. Abilities to integrate and apply what is learned .
  • 45. Large, varied array of courses Limited number of carefully constructed courses Any course at any time Developmental model Academic class experience only Involve complete undergraduate experience How should learning be organized to achieve the outcomes?
  • 46. Product (program structure)
  • 47. Product (program structure) From November intentions: same set of goals apply to all undergraduate, degree-seeking students no undergraduate program compromised or disadvantaged interdisciplinary from the first year of study built upon practices identified in research as being "high-impact”
  • 48. First year Subsequent years Subsequent years Subsequent years Third/fourth years
  • 49. First year Learning community Subsequent years Subsequent years Subsequent years Third/fourth years
  • 50. May be paired courses or team taught, enrolled in a cohort group with other entering students. First year Learning community Subsequent years Subsequent years Subsequent years Third/fourth years
  • 51. First year Learning community Subsequent years Global/international Subsequent years Subsequent years Third/fourth years
  • 52. Traditional coursework, language study, or study abroad. Build intercultural knowledge and competence with expressly international/global content. First year Learning community Subsequent years Global/international Subsequent years Subsequent years Third/fourth years
  • 53. First year Learning community Subsequent years Global/international Subsequent years Experiential Subsequent years Third/fourth years
  • 54. Internship in field of major, course-embedded service learning, study abroad First year Learning community Subsequent years Global/international Subsequent years Experiential Subsequent years Third/fourth years
  • 55. First year Learning community Subsequent years Global/international Subsequent years Experiential Subsequent years Other, traditional courses Third/fourth years Global Citizenship Keystone
  • 56. Upper-level, interdisciplinary – serves to “cap” and integrate the general education program First year Learning community Subsequent years Global/international Subsequent years Experiential Subsequent years Other, traditional courses Third/fourth years Global Citizenship Keystone
  • 57. First year Learning community Subsequent years Global/international Subsequent years Experiential Subsequent years Other, traditional courses Third/fourth years Global Citizenship Keystone
  • 58.  
  • 59. Three issues
    • How much of each skill and practice?
    • Details for special populations – transfer, professional preparation
    • Procedure/process for including courses and other experiences
  • 60. Arrow Process Why use graphics from PowerPointing.com? Program Design; Assessment Plan “ transform students for global citizenship and individual excellence” You are here. What students experience “ core competencies for responsible global citizenship in the 21st century” Purposeful pathways and a plan for telling whether they work Learning Goals & Outcomes Program Content Program Mission University Mission The General Education Reform Process March, 2010
  • 61.