Third Global Citizenship ProgramSummer Collaboratory:Overview and Progress UpdateBruce UmbaughDirector, Global Citizenship...
MissionThe mission of the Global Citizenship Program isto ensure that every undergraduate studentemerges from Webster Univ...
I’m filled withoptimism.
Optimism in a Bottle, by Robert Banh.CC by. Some rights reserved.
How did we get here?What are we doing?How well?What’s next?
Amelia Earhart and “old Bessie,”Purdue University Libraries.Public domain.Charles Lindbergh and the Sprit ofSt. Louis, Uni...
(1)
General Education at Webster
Why a new general education program?
General Education at WebsterPrior to 1994: 128 hours and a major -- no general degree requirements
1988 NCA Visiting Team:“the stress on the freedom tochoose courses has led to anineffective general educationprogram.”
1988 NCA Visiting Team:“the stress on the freedom tochoose courses has led to anineffective general educationprogram.”1988...
1988 NCA Visiting Team:“the stress on the freedom tochoose courses has led to anineffective general educationprogram.”1988...
1988 NCA Visiting Team:“the stress on the freedom tochoose courses has led to anineffective general educationprogram.”1988...
1988 NCA Visiting Team:“the stress on the freedom tochoose courses has led to anineffective general educationprogram.”2008...
Three things converged:New University mission statementHLC Visit and Report: “Improve assessment practices.”Presidential s...
2008-2009: Presidential SearchSummer 2009Dr. Elizabeth (Beth) Stroble joinsWebster University as our11th President
Arrow ProcessWhy use graphics from PowerPointing.com?ProgramDesign;AssessmentPlan“transform studentsfor global citizenship...
General Education revision began in 2009.The GCP Task Force made itsrecommendations in November 2010.The Faculty Assembly ...
Arrow ProcessWhy use graphics from PowerPointing.com?ProgramDesign;AssessmentPlan“transform studentsfor global citizenship...
General Education revision began in 2009.The Faculty Assembly approved theGlobal Citizenship Program in Spring 2011.Studen...
(2)
PurposefulPathways: Abeginning, middle, and endFirst Year Seminar introducesprogram, emphasizescommunication, criticalthin...
What do students need?
What do students need?
What do students need?• Knowledge• Skills• Abilities to integrate and apply
GCP Courses (Program Content)More than 100 courses (a 75% decrease from previously),from 18 departments, with 38 prefixes
(3)
National Research and Best PracticesThe Global Citizenship Program aligns with: Webster University Mission and Values Re...
Guided by Mission
MissionThe mission of the Global Citizenship Program isto ensure that every undergraduate studentemerges from Webster Univ...
National Research and Best PracticesThe Global Citizenship Program aligns with research: Association of American Colleges...
High Impact Practices• First-Year Seminars and Experiences• Common Intellectual Experiences• Learning Communities• Writing...
High Impact Practices• GPA• Students’ reports of how much they learned• General skills (writing, speaking, analyzing probl...
OECD “Skills Strategy”“Better Skills, Better Jobs, Better Lives: A Strategic Approach to Skills Policies”Launched May 21, ...
OECD “Skills Strategy”“Skills have become theglobal currency of 21stcentury economies.”-- OECD Secretary-General Angel Gur...
OECD “Skills Strategy”“Since skills requirements change and people need to adaptand learn new skills over their working li...
OECD “Skills Strategy”Curricula for the 21st century:• Knowledge – connected to real-worldexperience• Skills – including h...
What do students need?• Knowledge• Skills• Abilities to integrate and apply
What do students need?• KnowledgeRoots of Cultures, Social Systems & HumanBehavior, Physical & Natural World, GlobalUnders...
What do students need?
What do students need?Career Success?
GCP and Career Success Todays students will have 10-14 jobs by the timethey are 38. Every year, more than 30 million Ame...
GCP and Career Success Todays students will have 10-14 jobs by the timethey are 38. Every year, more than 30 million Ame...
GCP Competencies are the Gateway toCareer Success“Irrespective of college major orinstitutional selectivity, what matterst...
Kelly Diecker, Psychology majorResearch Assistant, ICF International
Emily Bahr, Mathematics majorStudying college student personnel,International student services assistantshipAubrey Gohl, P...
Not just Webster. Not just socialsciences, social service, and so on.
GCP and Career Success
The Growing Demand for Higher Order Skills57
Giving students what they needRaising the Bar: Employers’ Views on College Learning in the Wake of the Economic Downturn,H...
Wage Premium for GCP LearningOutcomesThe highest salaries apply to positions that call for intensive use ofliberal educati...
GCP and Career SuccessFor career success students should develop thesecapabilities in college, because• the marketplace re...
What do students need?
What do students need?30 of 128 hours
Cafeteria “A,” 1947, Duke University Archives. Durham, North Carolina, USA.CC by-nc-sa, Some rights reserved.Cold-war era ...
Integrative LearningGCP integrates learning ofKnowledge + Skill in a course
Integrative Learning• Knowledge + Skill in one course:– Essentials of Biology I is also a WrittenCommunication course– Mea...
Integrative LearningMultiple skills in Seminars:– First-year Seminars• Interdisciplinary• address written communication, o...
Giving students what they needMeeting other needs
OECD “Skills Strategy”
High Impact Practices• GPA• Students’ reports of how much they learned• General skills (writing, speaking, analyzing probl...
Meaningful work and fulfillmentthat youdo wellthat makes apositivedifferenceSomethingyou lovedoingBased on Dave Pollard, H...
Global Citizenship Programcompetencies are key to:a) a “good life” that is satisfying and fulfilling,b) responsible global...
(4)
Evaluating our Progress
Evaluating our Progress
Evaluating our Progress
Evaluating our Progress
(5)
(6)
To conclude,
Amelia Earhart and “old Bessie,”Purdue University Libraries.Public domain.Charles Lindbergh and the Sprit ofSt. Louis, Uni...
KnowledgeRoots of CulturesSocial Systems & Human BehaviorPhysical & Natural WorldGlobal UnderstandingArts AppreciationSkil...
OECD on high-quality learningenvironmentsHigh-quality learning environments need to:•make learning central and encourage e...
George Kuh on What Makes PracticesHigh-impactIn high-impact education practices, students:• invest time and effort,• inter...
The next three days:
Signature program
Make every GCPcourse excellent.
2013 GCP Collaboratory Overview and Progress Update
2013 GCP Collaboratory Overview and Progress Update
2013 GCP Collaboratory Overview and Progress Update
2013 GCP Collaboratory Overview and Progress Update
2013 GCP Collaboratory Overview and Progress Update
2013 GCP Collaboratory Overview and Progress Update
2013 GCP Collaboratory Overview and Progress Update
2013 GCP Collaboratory Overview and Progress Update
2013 GCP Collaboratory Overview and Progress Update
2013 GCP Collaboratory Overview and Progress Update
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2013 GCP Collaboratory Overview and Progress Update

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Overview of the Global Citizenship Program, its structure, background, and rationale, indications of progress in implementation and in development of the GCP as a strong program of general education, preview of the 2013 Collaboratory experience.

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2013 GCP Collaboratory Overview and Progress Update

  1. 1. Third Global Citizenship ProgramSummer Collaboratory:Overview and Progress UpdateBruce UmbaughDirector, Global Citizenship ProgramMay 20, 2013#gcp2013
  2. 2. MissionThe mission of the Global Citizenship Program isto ensure that every undergraduate studentemerges from Webster University with the corecompetencies required for responsible globalcitizenship in the 21st Century.
  3. 3. I’m filled withoptimism.
  4. 4. Optimism in a Bottle, by Robert Banh.CC by. Some rights reserved.
  5. 5. How did we get here?What are we doing?How well?What’s next?
  6. 6. Amelia Earhart and “old Bessie,”Purdue University Libraries.Public domain.Charles Lindbergh and the Sprit ofSt. Louis, United States Libraryof Congress. Public domain.1927 1932May 20
  7. 7. (1)
  8. 8. General Education at Webster
  9. 9. Why a new general education program?
  10. 10. General Education at WebsterPrior to 1994: 128 hours and a major -- no general degree requirements
  11. 11. 1988 NCA Visiting Team:“the stress on the freedom tochoose courses has led to anineffective general educationprogram.”
  12. 12. 1988 NCA Visiting Team:“the stress on the freedom tochoose courses has led to anineffective general educationprogram.”1988-1993, Faculty develop programs(building on work dating to 1985)
  13. 13. 1988 NCA Visiting Team:“the stress on the freedom tochoose courses has led to anineffective general educationprogram.”1988-1993, Faculty develop programs(building on work dating to 1985):• Nine distribution areas (3 credit each)• Four-of-nine distribution areas• 36-hour program across three areas
  14. 14. 1988 NCA Visiting Team:“the stress on the freedom tochoose courses has led to anineffective general educationprogram.”1988-1993: Faculty develop programs(building on work dating to 1985):• Nine distribution areas (3 credit each)• Four-of-nine distribution areas• 36-hour program across three areas1998 NCA Visiting Team:“It is the Team’s sense that theinstitution took the concernsseriously, and responded to thoseconcerns in a well thought outfashion.”
  15. 15. 1988 NCA Visiting Team:“the stress on the freedom tochoose courses has led to anineffective general educationprogram.”2008 HLC Visit Team:“The team found no evidenceof a clear feedback loop betweengeneral education assessmentdata and the improvement ofteaching and learning.”
  16. 16. Three things converged:New University mission statementHLC Visit and Report: “Improve assessment practices.”Presidential search: Significant changes ahead.
  17. 17. 2008-2009: Presidential SearchSummer 2009Dr. Elizabeth (Beth) Stroble joinsWebster University as our11th President
  18. 18. Arrow ProcessWhy use graphics from PowerPointing.com?ProgramDesign;AssessmentPlan“transform studentsfor global citizenshipand individualexcellence”What do we want forstudents?What studentsexperience“core competenciesfor responsible globalcitizenship in the 21stcentury”Purposeful pathwaysand a plan for tellingwhether they workLearning Goals& OutcomesProgramContentProgramMissionUniversityMissionThe General Education Reform Process
  19. 19. General Education revision began in 2009.The GCP Task Force made itsrecommendations in November 2010.The Faculty Assembly approved theGlobal Citizenship Program in Spring 2011.Students began study in the GCP in 2012at campuses in St. Louis, Cha-am, Geneva,Leiden, London, and Vienna.
  20. 20. Arrow ProcessWhy use graphics from PowerPointing.com?ProgramDesign;AssessmentPlan“transform studentsfor global citizenshipand individualexcellence”You are here.What studentsexperience“core competenciesfor responsible globalcitizenship in the 21stcentury”Purposeful pathwaysand a plan for tellingwhether they workLearning Goals& OutcomesProgramContentProgramMissionUniversityMissionThe General Education Reform ProcessMay, 2013What do we want forstudents?
  21. 21. General Education revision began in 2009.The Faculty Assembly approved theGlobal Citizenship Program in Spring 2011.Students began study in the GCP in 2012.This is a highly unusual timeline.
  22. 22. (2)
  23. 23. PurposefulPathways: Abeginning, middle, and endFirst Year Seminar introducesprogram, emphasizescommunication, criticalthinking, interdisciplinarity, integration123Courses addressknowledge, communication, criticalthinking, ethical reasoning, globalunderstanding, interculturalcompetence, integrative thinkingGlobal Keystone Seminar serves as capstonefor the Global Citizenship Program,and also prepares students to succeed inculminating work in the major
  24. 24. What do students need?
  25. 25. What do students need?
  26. 26. What do students need?• Knowledge• Skills• Abilities to integrate and apply
  27. 27. GCP Courses (Program Content)More than 100 courses (a 75% decrease from previously),from 18 departments, with 38 prefixes
  28. 28. (3)
  29. 29. National Research and Best PracticesThe Global Citizenship Program aligns with: Webster University Mission and Values Research on high-quality learning experiences Employer needs Student needs
  30. 30. Guided by Mission
  31. 31. MissionThe mission of the Global Citizenship Program isto ensure that every undergraduate studentemerges from Webster University with the corecompetencies required for responsible globalcitizenship in the 21st Century.
  32. 32. National Research and Best PracticesThe Global Citizenship Program aligns with research: Association of American Colleges & Universities Research on High Impact Practices / High-qualityLearning Experiences Organization for Economic Cooperation andDevelopment
  33. 33. High Impact Practices• First-Year Seminars and Experiences• Common Intellectual Experiences• Learning Communities• Writing-Intensive Courses• Collaborative Assignments and Projects• “Science as Science Is Done”/Undergraduate Research• Diversity/Global Learning• Service Learning, Internships, Community-Based Learning• Capstone Courses and Projects
  34. 34. High Impact Practices• GPA• Students’ reports of how much they learned• General skills (writing, speaking, analyzing problems)• Deep Learning (pursuit of learning beyond memorization to seekunderlying meanings & relationships)• Practical competence (working with others, solving complex/real-world problems)• Effects greater for underserved students• Effects cumulative
  35. 35. OECD “Skills Strategy”“Better Skills, Better Jobs, Better Lives: A Strategic Approach to Skills Policies”Launched May 21, 2012
  36. 36. OECD “Skills Strategy”“Skills have become theglobal currency of 21stcentury economies.”-- OECD Secretary-General Angel Gurría
  37. 37. OECD “Skills Strategy”“Since skills requirements change and people need to adaptand learn new skills over their working lives to ensureoccupational mobility . . . people should master foundationskills and . . . develop the general desire and capacity toengage in learning over an entire lifetime.”Better Skills Better Jobs Better Lives: A Strategic Approach to Skills Policies,OECD Publishing, 2012, p. 26
  38. 38. OECD “Skills Strategy”Curricula for the 21st century:• Knowledge – connected to real-worldexperience• Skills – including higher-order skills (Creativity,Communication, Critical Thinking,Collaboration)• Values• Meta-layer – integration and learning how tocontinue to learn
  39. 39. What do students need?• Knowledge• Skills• Abilities to integrate and apply
  40. 40. What do students need?• KnowledgeRoots of Cultures, Social Systems & HumanBehavior, Physical & Natural World, GlobalUnderstanding, Arts Appreciation, QuantitativeLiteracy• SkillsCritical Thinking, Written Communication, OralCommunication, Intercultural Competence, EthicalReasoning, Collaboration, Integration
  41. 41. What do students need?
  42. 42. What do students need?Career Success?
  43. 43. GCP and Career Success Todays students will have 10-14 jobs by the timethey are 38. Every year, more than 30 million Americans areworking in jobs that did not exist in the previousquarter.Department of Labor – Bureau of Labor Statistics
  44. 44. GCP and Career Success Todays students will have 10-14 jobs by the timethey are 38. Every year, more than 30 million Americans areworking in jobs that did not exist in the previousquarter.Department of Labor – Bureau of Labor Statistics
  45. 45. GCP Competencies are the Gateway toCareer Success“Irrespective of college major orinstitutional selectivity, what mattersto career success is students’development of a broad set of cross-cutting capacities…”Anthony Carnevale, Georgetown UniversityCenter on Education and the Workforce
  46. 46. Kelly Diecker, Psychology majorResearch Assistant, ICF International
  47. 47. Emily Bahr, Mathematics majorStudying college student personnel,International student services assistantshipAubrey Gohl, Public Relations majorActivity Director,Adams Place assisted living center
  48. 48. Not just Webster. Not just socialsciences, social service, and so on.
  49. 49. GCP and Career Success
  50. 50. The Growing Demand for Higher Order Skills57
  51. 51. Giving students what they needRaising the Bar: Employers’ Views on College Learning in the Wake of the Economic Downturn,Hart Research Associates, for the AAC&U, January, 2010
  52. 52. Wage Premium for GCP LearningOutcomesThe highest salaries apply to positions that call for intensive use ofliberal education capabilities, including (random order): Writing Judgment and Decision Making Problem Solving Social/Interpersonal Skills Mathematics OriginalitySource: Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce
  53. 53. GCP and Career SuccessFor career success students should develop thesecapabilities in college, because• the marketplace rewards graduates with the highestlevels of achievement in these key learningoutcomes, and• they give access to career paths that require andfurther develop these high level capabilities.
  54. 54. What do students need?
  55. 55. What do students need?30 of 128 hours
  56. 56. Cafeteria “A,” 1947, Duke University Archives. Durham, North Carolina, USA.CC by-nc-sa, Some rights reserved.Cold-war era general education
  57. 57. Integrative LearningGCP integrates learning ofKnowledge + Skill in a course
  58. 58. Integrative Learning• Knowledge + Skill in one course:– Essentials of Biology I is also a WrittenCommunication course– Meaning of Life addresses Global Understandingand Intercultural Competence– Design Concepts is also an Oral Communicationcourse– Dance as an Art Form is also a Critical Thinkingcourse
  59. 59. Integrative LearningMultiple skills in Seminars:– First-year Seminars• Interdisciplinary• address written communication, oralcommunication, critical thinking, and integrativelearning– Global Keystone Seminars• Address knowledge from interdisciplinary perspectives• as well as all the skills components
  60. 60. Giving students what they needMeeting other needs
  61. 61. OECD “Skills Strategy”
  62. 62. High Impact Practices• GPA• Students’ reports of how much they learned• General skills (writing, speaking, analyzing problems)• Deep Learning (pursuit of learning beyond memorization to seekunderlying meanings & relationships)• Practical competence (working with others, solving complex/real-world problems)• Effects greater for underserved students• Effects cumulativeAlso:• Personal and Social Development (developing ethics, understandingdifferent backgrounds, understanding self, contributing tocommunity, voting)
  63. 63. Meaningful work and fulfillmentthat youdo wellthat makes apositivedifferenceSomethingyou lovedoingBased on Dave Pollard, How to Save the World
  64. 64. Global Citizenship Programcompetencies are key to:a) a “good life” that is satisfying and fulfilling,b) responsible global citizenship in the 21stcentury, andc) career success and earning power.
  65. 65. (4)
  66. 66. Evaluating our Progress
  67. 67. Evaluating our Progress
  68. 68. Evaluating our Progress
  69. 69. Evaluating our Progress
  70. 70. (5)
  71. 71. (6)
  72. 72. To conclude,
  73. 73. Amelia Earhart and “old Bessie,”Purdue University Libraries.Public domain.Charles Lindbergh and the Sprit ofSt. Louis, United States Libraryof Congress. Public domain.
  74. 74. KnowledgeRoots of CulturesSocial Systems & Human BehaviorPhysical & Natural WorldGlobal UnderstandingArts AppreciationSkillsWritten CommunicationOral CommunicationCritical ThinkingQuantitative LiteracyEthical ReasoningIntercultural CompetenceProblem SolvingIntegrative LearningCollaborationGLOBAL CITIZENSHIP PUZZLE
  75. 75. OECD on high-quality learningenvironmentsHigh-quality learning environments need to:•make learning central and encourage engagement• ensure that learning is social and often collaborative• be highly attuned to the motivations of learners• be sensitive to individual differences, including prior knowledge• use assessments that emphasiseformative feedback•promote connections across activities and subjects,both in and out of school.Source: OECD, Innovative Learning Environment Project.
  76. 76. George Kuh on What Makes PracticesHigh-impactIn high-impact education practices, students:• invest time and effort,• interact with faculty and peers about substantive matters,• experience diversity,• respond to more frequent feedback,• reflect and integrate learning, and• discover relevance of learning through real-world applications.Source: Kuh, High-Impact Educational Practices: What They Are,Who Has Access to Them, and Why They Matter. AAC&U, 2008.
  77. 77. The next three days:
  78. 78. Signature program
  79. 79. Make every GCPcourse excellent.

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