WOMM umbrella terms  

 

BUZZ Marketing  

Def: The interaction of consumers and users of a product or service serv...
Stealth marketing  

Def: a subset of guerrilla marketing, where consumers do not realize they are being marketed to. 
Ste...
Street marketing  

Def: Interacting at popular offline places. Also known as Street teams promotions. A Street team is a ...
 

Social marketing  

                                  Def: Social marketing is the planning and implementation of 
    ...
Crowd‐sourcing  

Despite the jargony name, crowdsourcing 
is a very real and important business 
idea. Definitions and te...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

WOMM Umbrella Terms

830 views

Published on

Word of mouth Marketing - umbrella terms: descriptions and some examples

Published in: Business, News & Politics
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
830
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

WOMM Umbrella Terms

  1. 1.   WOMM umbrella terms     BUZZ Marketing   Def: The interaction of consumers and users of a product or service serve to amplify the original  marketing message. It can be a special hook, event, promotion. More info:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marketing_buzz   Eg: ATHF Boston Bomb Scare (2007).  On January 31, 2007, in Boston  there was panic in the streets. Bomb squads were finding electronic  packages attached to the bases of bridges. These had a mocking  character with its middle finger presented for all to see. The police  BLEW ONE UP. A few hours later they realized that the packages  were none other than Mooninites! The devices turned out to be  battery‐powered LED placards with an image of a cartoon character  called a Mooninite. The placards were part of a campaign for Aqua Teen Hunger Force Colon Movie  Film for Theaters, a film based on the animated TV series Aqua Teen Hunger Force (ATHF) on Cartoon  Network's Adult Swim late‐night programming block. More:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2007_Boston_bomb_scare,  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7kdP8WBB4lI        Viral marketing   Def: ‘Viral marketing’ or ‘viral advertising’ refer to marketing techniques that use pre‐existing social  networks to produce increases in brand awareness or to achieve other marketing objectives (such as  product sales) through self‐replicating viral processes. Viral promotions may take the form of video  clips, interactive Flash games, advergames, ebooks, brandable software, images, or even text  messages; branded material, websites, blogs, advergames, widgets, bligets, videos, utilities,  collaboration tools etc. that sneezers spread. More:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viral_marketing   Eg: ParkRidge47, Vote Different (2007). Creator of the '1984' anti‐ Clinton ad http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6h3G‐lMZxjo. More:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UtgfYMDHJfs,  http://personaldemocracy.com/content/who‐parkridge47        
  2. 2. Stealth marketing   Def: a subset of guerrilla marketing, where consumers do not realize they are being marketed to.  Stealth marketing can take place both online and offline. For example, people may pose as liking and  therefore recommend a product on various internet forums, only for these people to in fact be  working for a company. Offline strategies include actors posing as ordinary people in busy locations,  where they can convincingly use certain products and interact with nearby consumers without them  realizing that they are victims of stealth marketing. Also known as ‘undercover marketing’. More:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Undercover_marketing  Eg: Bree, lonelyGirl15 (2006‐2008). Interactive web‐based video series,  focusing on the life of a teenage girl named Bree, whose YouTube  username is the eponymous "lonelygirl15", but the show does not  reveal its fictional nature to its audience. More:  http://www.youtube.com/user/lonelygirl15,  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lonelygirl15   Eg: Sony Ericsson (2002) hired 60 actors in 10 major cities, and had them "accost strangers and ask  them: Would you mind taking my picture?" The actor then handed the stranger a brand new picture  phone while talking about how cool the new device was. "And thus an act of civility was converted  into a branding event."  Stealth marketing strategies and tools: http://www.optimum7.com/internet‐marketing/business‐ online/stealth‐marketing.html, http://www.stealthmarketingstrategies.com/       Influencer marketing   Def: Identifying and finding the influencers. A form of marketing that has emerged from a variety of  recent practices and studies, in which focus is placed on specific key individuals (or types of  individual) rather than the target market as a whole. It identifies the individuals that have influence  over potential buyers, and orients marketing activities around these influencers. More:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Influencer_marketing, http://www.influencermarketing.com/       Evangelist marketing   Def: An advanced form of word of mouth marketing (WOMM) in which companies develop  customers who believe so strongly in a particular product or service that they freely try to convince  others to buy and use it. The customers become voluntary advocates, actively spreading the word on  behalf of the company. It is about turning most loyal customers into citizen marketers. More:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evangelism_marketing, http://www.evangelistmarketing.com/  
  3. 3. Street marketing   Def: Interacting at popular offline places. Also known as Street teams promotions. A Street team is a  term used in marketing to describe a group of people who 'hit the streets' promoting an event or a  product. 'Street Teams' are a powerful promotional tool that has been adopted industry wide as a  standard line item in marketing budgets by entertainment companies, record labels, the tech  industry, corporate brand marketers, new media companies and direct marketers worldwide. Street  team members that are highly trained are now called Brand Ambassadors. Usually unpaid, street  teams for bands and artists are still often composed of teenagers who are rewarded for eg. with free  band merchandise or show/concert access, in exchange for a variety of actions: placing stickers and  posters in their communities, bringing friends to the shows,  convincing friends to buy band merchandise, phoning your  local radio station to request their songs be played, bringing  CDs to local DJs in the clubs where they work, putting up  posters, posting to band forums, maintaining e‐zines or  websites dedicated to the band… More:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Street_team   Eg: Buzz Oven. In the 7 years since its inception, Buzz‐Oven and its volunteers have distributed over  200,000 free CDs to teenagers all over North Texas and held over 75 All Ages concerts. Watch the  video at: http://www.buzz‐oven.com/       Guerilla marketing  Def: The concept of guerrilla marketing was  invented as an unconventional system of  promotions that relies on time, energy and  imagination rather than a big marketing budget.  Typically, guerrilla marketing campaigns are  unexpected and unconventional, potentially  interactive, and consumers are targeted in  unexpected places. The objective of guerrilla  marketing is to create a unique, engaging and  thought‐provoking concept to generate buzz, and  consequently turn viral. The term was coined and  defined by Jay Conrad Levinson in his book Guerrilla Marketing. The term has since entered the  popular vocabulary and marketing textbooks. More:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guerrilla_marketing and http://www.gmarketing.com/   Eg: IKEA Bus Stop (see photo). More: http://sparxoo.com/2009/06/22/top‐5‐guerilla‐marketing‐ strategies/    
  4. 4.   Social marketing    Def: Social marketing is the planning and implementation of  programs designed to bring about social change using concepts from  commercial marketing. Social marketing was born as a discipline in  the 1970s, when Philip Kotler and Gerald Zaltman realized that the  same marketing principles that were being used to sell products to  consumers could be used to sell ideas, attitudes and behaviors.  Kotler and Andreasen define social marketing as "differing from other areas of marketing only with  respect to the objectives of the marketer and his or her organization. Social marketing seeks to  influence social behaviors not to benefit the marketer, but to benefit the target audience and the  general society." More: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_marketing, http://www.social‐ marketing.com/Whatis.html,   Eg: Stop AIDS campaign. More: http://www.social‐marketing.org/success/cs‐stopaids.html       Social networks   A social network is a social structure made of individuals (or organizations) called "nodes," which are  tied (connected) by one or more specific types of interdependency, such as friendship, kinship,  financial exchange, dislike, sexual relationships, or relationships of beliefs, knowledge or prestige.  More: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_network       PR 2.0   Integrating the PR efforts in the social media sphere. Other terms: Online PR, e‐PR, Internet PR,  Digital PR… More: http://www.seo‐pr.com/public‐relations‐turning‐into‐what‐pr2.0.shtml and  http://www.shiftcomm.com/downloads/pr2essentials.pdf       Blog marketing   Blog marketing is the term used to describe internet marketing via web blogs. These blogs differ  from corporate websites because they feature daily or weekly posts, often around a single topic.  Typically, corporations use blogs to create a dialog with customers and explain features of their  products and services. More: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blog_marketing  
  5. 5. Crowd‐sourcing   Despite the jargony name, crowdsourcing  is a very real and important business  idea. Definitions and terms vary, but the  basic idea is to tap into the collective  intelligence of the public at large to  complete business‐related tasks that a  company would normally either perform  itself or outsource to a third‐party  provider. Yet free labor is only a narrow  part of crowdsourcing's appeal. More  importantly, it enables managers to  expand the size of their talent pool while  also gaining deeper insight into what  customers really want.   Jeff Howe, a contributing editor to Wired magazine, first coined the term "crowdsourcing" in a June  2006 article and writes the blog crowdsourcing.com.   Eg: Unilever has recently decided to drop its ad agency of 16 years, Lowe, and has turned to the  crowdsourcing platform IdeaBounty to find creative ideas for its next TV campaign. Unilever has  worked with Lowe on the snack food brand Peperami since 1993, but has decided to submit their  brief out to the public, rather than a small team of creatives. More: http://www.ideabounty.com/,   Eg: Pepsi launched a marketing campaign in early 2007 which allowed consumers to design the look  of a Pepsi can. The winners would receive a $10,000 prize, and their artwork would be featured on  500 million Pepsi cans around the United States. More: http://www.designourpepsican.com/ and  http://www.pepsigallery.com/?or=dopc   More: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crowdsourcing, crowdsourcing.com.      Community marketing   Product seeding   Twitter marketing   Testimonials   Marketing 2.0  …etc. 

×