getting there together:  assessing student learning<br />buffy j. hamilton  || june 2011teachers as learners conference <b...
How do you define assessment?<br />Discussion Starter<br />
Don’t forget: You can copy-paste this slide into other presentations, and move or resize the poll.<br />
How do you Know when students have learned?<br />Discussion Starter<br />
Poll Question 1<br />How often do you as the school librarian assist in assessment of student work in your collaborative w...
“I don’t have time to grade or evaluate student work.”<br />“I have to teach the same lessons time after time because the ...
<ul><li>Assessment is not my job – it’s the teacher’s job
Assessment is done for a grade
Assessment is separate and distinct from learning</li></ul>Small Group/Whole Group Discussion:  Challenging Assumptions an...
3 essential questions for school librarians<br />
“are we invisible or visible and indispensable teaching <br />partners?”<br />Source:  DuPre, 2008 from challenges identif...
“do we view assessment as intuitive and incidental or integral and intentional to learning?”<br />Source:  DuPre, 2008 fro...
“do we simply spout rhetoric on the importance of assessment, or can we demonstrate results?”<br />Source:  DuPre, 2008 fr...
rationales for participating in assessment of student learning<br />1<br />CC image via http://goo.gl/CkHvX<br />
why should school library media specialists play an active role in the assessment of student learning?<br />
we cannot truly claim our role as teacher or provide direct evidence of the impact of library programs on student achievem...
“The school library media program is guided by regular assessment of student learning to ensure the program is meeting its...
Uses formative assessment that give students feedback and the chance to revise their work<br />Uses summative assessments ...
Creates rubrics for student work that integrate curricular, informational, and critical thinking standards<br />Documents ...
Solicits student input for the assessment of inquiry based instructional units upon their completion<br />Solicits student...
“Library media specialists who reframe themselves as learning specialists will find the recognition, respect, and collabor...
“good library business” is about plotting and sticking to the library’s commitment to student learning<br />
assessment is often the missing piece in our collaborative efforts with classroom teachers<br />Source: Harada & Yoshina, ...
forms of assessment<br />2<br />CC image via http://goo.gl/zOduy<br />
formative assessment: <br />the measurement of knowledge and skills during the process of learning<br />Source:  Stripling...
Formative Assessment<br />Formative assessments engage the school library media specialist, classroom teacher, and student...
Examples of Teacher Led Formative Assessments<br />Checklists<br />Rubrics<br />Exit cards or slips<br />Observation check...
Examples of Student Led Formative Assessments<br />Reflecting (learning logs or blogs, notetaking)<br />Video recorded ref...
summative assessment is the measurement of knowledge and skills at the end of a process of learning in order to determine ...
Summative Assessments<br />Presentations<br />Portfolios<br />Text based papers <br />Reflective narratives<br />Multimedi...
What formative and summative assessment are you using or Would you like to try in 2011-12?<br />Share and Discuss<br />
Poll Question 2<br />How often do students engage in formative or summative self-assessments?<br />
student self-assessment:  who is in charge of your learning?<br />
Standards for the 21st Century Learner in Action<br />Original photography by Buffy J. Hamilton<br />
Benefits of Student Self-Assessment<br />Encourages participatory learning<br />Increases intrinsic motivation<br />Helps ...
Possibilities for Self Assessments<br />Forms of formative assessment can be adapted<br />Students can participate in eval...
CC image via http://goo.gl/tiSB7<br />
3<br />incorporating assessment into the collaborative instructional design process<br />
“the shift from a teaching focus to a learning focus is a crucial one”  violet harada<br />CC image via http://www.flickr....
school librarians must engage in evidence based practice<br />
identify specific learning       <br />targets<br />Source:  Harada & Yoshina, 2006<br />
look for criteria to help us assess how well students achieve the targets and state the criteria clearly in terms of desir...
select a strategy or tool to conduct the assessment<br />Source:  Harada & Yoshina, 2006<br />CC image via http://goo.gl/w...
design a performance task for students demonstrating their achievement of a learning target<br />Source:  Harada & Yoshina...
these “snapshots” of student work provide us concrete evidence to adjust our instruction and better meet learner needs<br ...
how does this process look in real world practice?<br />CC image via http://www.flickr.com/photos/nhuisman/3168683736/size...
Designing Learning with Backwards Design<br />What do we want students to learn?(standards and objectives)<br />How will w...
Contents of a Lesson/Unit Template<br />Title of Lesson<br />Grade Level/Subject Area<br />Content standards, including be...
Contents of a Lesson/Unit Template<br />Specific learning targets<br />Criteria to assess achievement of the learning targ...
Contents of a Lesson/Unit Template<br />Lesson procedure<br />Resources for the lesson<br />Assessment results<br />Reflec...
Lesson/Unit Plan Templates<br />Google document may be accessed at http://goo.gl/mlAJT<br />Image credit:  School Library ...
carousel of ideas<br />CC image via http://goo.gl/jZbmh<br />
formative and summative assessments<br />
1.2.5 Demonstrate adaptability by changing the inquiry focus, questions, resources, or strategies when necessary to achiev...
google forms<br />
creating conversations for assessment<br />
let’s work together<br />CC image via http://goo.gl/C7zHC<br />
closing reflections and conversation<br />CC image via http://goo.gl/OzJ9g<br />
Reflection and Discussion<br />What are you already doing?<br />What questions are going through your<br />mind?<br />What...
recommended reads<br />
CC image via http://goo.gl/G4hWF<br />
References<br />Abler, R. (2011, February 15). Why formative assessments matter. Retrieved from Edutopia website: http://w...
References<br />Harada, V. H. (2007, November). From eyeballing to evidence: assessing for learning in hawaii library medi...
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June 2011 Getting There Together: Assessing Student Learning

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  • This is fabulous. I'd never thought of integrating our school librarian in this way. Being a music teacher, I've never really made good use of the librarian as they often feel out of their comfort zone in the music learning space. I think, if nothing else, I'll start asking my librarian to look over my assessment task notices and see if she can understand it (maybe to see it from a student's perspective) and provide some feedback. Thanks for sharing this slideshow.
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  • Press F5 or use the tool bar to enter presentation mode in order to see the poll.\r\nIn an emergency during your presentation, if the poll isn&apos;t showing, navigate to this link in your web browser:http://www.polleverywhere.com/free_text_polls/NzgxMDAzMDQwIf you like, you can use this slide as a template for your own voting slides. You might use a slide like this if you feel your audience would benefit from the picture showing a text message on a phone.
  • Let’s take a moment to discuss these two statements and their implications.
  • Source: DuPre, 2008
  • There is no upside to library media specialists collaborating with classroom teachers on tasks that are bad business. If library media specialists participate in the design and orchestration of these types of tasks, even though they know that it is &quot;bad business,&quot; they become accomplices in the assignment of yet another task that dilutes inquiry to the level of answering the questions on a worksheet, reduces deep reading to counting the number of pages read, and prostitutes construction of knowledge to a cut-and-paste exercise. The library media specialist must insist that every learning experience in the library-classroom aligns with the learning goals of both the classroom teacher’s curriculum and the library media curriculum. The key to depersonalizing this transformation of &quot;bad business&quot; to &quot;good business&quot; comes from the continued insistence that this isn’t about what the teacher or library media specialist prefers, but what the learner requires. Source : Harada &amp; Zmuda, 2008
  • The questions central to whether this student learning is successful are as follows:What have they been learning?How well have they been learning?How can we verify they are learning?Source: (Harada &amp; Yoshina, 2006)
  • Source: Stripling, 2007/2009, pp. 167-68
  • Source: Stripling, 2007/2009, pp. 167-68
  • Source: Stripling, 2007/2009, pp. 167-68
  • Source: Harada, 2010
  • (Harada, 2010)Students better understand what is expectedStudents access prior knowledgeStudents have ownership over making the learning happenStudents give themselves as well as others descriptive feedback as they are learning
  • Placeholder: share the kinds of formative and summative assessments you have used to assess student learning
  • This shift from a teaching focus to a learning focus is a crucial one. School library media specialists must consider not just how many lessons they conduct but whether students have actually been learning the skills taught.Source:(Harada &amp; Yoshina, 2006)
  • What do we assess? The important first step is to identify our specific learning target. 1.AASL Standards for 21st Century Learners (dispositions, responsibilities, skill benchmarks) 2. State performance standards for content areasSource: Harada &amp; Yoshina, 2006
  • What are we looking for? We need to develop criteria that help us assess how well students achieve the target. The criteria should be stated clearly in terms of the desired behaviors and must be written in language that the students can understand.Source:Harada &amp; Yoshina, 2006
  • How do we conduct the assessment? We need to select a strategy or tool, which can range from simple checklists to detailed rubrics, to conduct the assessment. Source:Harada &amp; Yoshina, 2006
  • How will students demonstrate their understanding? We need to design a performance task for students. By participating in this hands-on activity, students can demonstrate their achievement of the learning target.Source:Harada &amp; Yoshina, 2006
  • How can we use the results to adjust or modify our teaching? By utilizing concrete evidence of what students can and cannot do allows us to use that evidence to improve our instruction.Harada &amp; Yoshina, 2006
  • Placeholder to describe what this process looks like in action/examples
  • Source: Pappas, 2008/2009, p. 180
  • Source: Harada, 2007
  • Source: Harada, 2007
  • Source: Harada, 2007
  • Time for pairs to share
  • At this point, participants will be given time to work together and identify the following for an upcoming unit or current unit:1. What do we want students to learn? (standards and objectives)2. How will we know if learning has taken place? (Assessment tools or strategies)3. How will we facilitate the learning process? (Shared responsibility of the school librarian, classroom teacher, and student
  • Source: DuPre, 2008
  • Transcript of "June 2011 Getting There Together: Assessing Student Learning"

    1. 1. getting there together: assessing student learning<br />buffy j. hamilton || june 2011teachers as learners conference <br />griffin, georgia<br />CC image via http://www.flickr.com/photos/stuckincustoms/4076310756/sizes/l/in/photostream/<br />
    2. 2. How do you define assessment?<br />Discussion Starter<br />
    3. 3. Don’t forget: You can copy-paste this slide into other presentations, and move or resize the poll.<br />
    4. 4. How do you Know when students have learned?<br />Discussion Starter<br />
    5. 5. Poll Question 1<br />How often do you as the school librarian assist in assessment of student work in your collaborative work with classroom teachers or if you are a classroom teacher, how often does your school librarian assist you with assessment of student learning?<br />
    6. 6. “I don’t have time to grade or evaluate student work.”<br />“I have to teach the same lessons time after time because the students don’t learn.”<br />Source: DuPre, 2008, Harada, AASL Fall Forum, 2006<br />
    7. 7. <ul><li>Assessment is not my job – it’s the teacher’s job
    8. 8. Assessment is done for a grade
    9. 9. Assessment is separate and distinct from learning</li></ul>Small Group/Whole Group Discussion: Challenging Assumptions and Beliefs<br />Source: DuPre, 2008 from challenges identified by Dr. Violet H. Harada, AASL Fall Forum 2006<br />
    10. 10. 3 essential questions for school librarians<br />
    11. 11. “are we invisible or visible and indispensable teaching <br />partners?”<br />Source: DuPre, 2008 from challenges identified by Dr. Violet H. Harada, AASL Fall Forum 2006<br />
    12. 12. “do we view assessment as intuitive and incidental or integral and intentional to learning?”<br />Source: DuPre, 2008 from challenges identified by Dr. Violet H. Harada, AASL Fall Forum 2006<br />CC image via http://www.flickr.com/photos/houseofcards/94935329/sizes/l/in/faves-10557450@N04/<br />
    13. 13. “do we simply spout rhetoric on the importance of assessment, or can we demonstrate results?”<br />Source: DuPre, 2008 from challenges identified by Dr. Violet H. Harada, AASL Fall Forum 2006<br />CC image via http://goo.gl/oX70V<br />
    14. 14.
    15. 15. rationales for participating in assessment of student learning<br />1<br />CC image via http://goo.gl/CkHvX<br />
    16. 16. why should school library media specialists play an active role in the assessment of student learning?<br />
    17. 17. we cannot truly claim our role as teacher or provide direct evidence of the impact of library programs on student achievement without playing an active role in the assessment of student learning <br />
    18. 18. “The school library media program is guided by regular assessment of student learning to ensure the program is meeting its goals.”<br />Source: American Association of School Librarians, 2009, p. 27Original photograph by Buffy J. Hamilton<br />Original photograph by Buffy J. Hamilton<br />
    19. 19. Uses formative assessment that give students feedback and the chance to revise their work<br />Uses summative assessments of process and product in collaboration with teachers<br />Uses performance based assessments (rubrics, checklists, portfolios, journals, observation, conferencing, self-questioning)<br />Source: American Association of School Librarians, 2009, p. 27<br />Assessment for Teaching in Learning<br />
    20. 20. Creates rubrics for student work that integrate curricular, informational, and critical thinking standards<br />Documents student progress through portfolios that demonstrate growth<br />Implements critical analysis and evaluation strategies<br />Assessment for Teaching in Learning<br />Source: American Association of School Librarians, 2009, p. 27<br />
    21. 21. Solicits student input for the assessment of inquiry based instructional units upon their completion<br />Solicits student input for post-assessment of inquiry based instructional units<br />Solicits student input for post-assessment of inquiry-based instructional units<br />Assessment for Teaching in Learning<br />Source: American Association of School Librarians, 2009, p. 27<br />
    22. 22. “Library media specialists who reframe themselves as learning specialists will find the recognition, respect, and collaboration they seek when they put an end to "bad business" practices that divert focus from the mission”<br />Harada & Zmuda, 2008http://goo.gl/zOFNw<br />
    23. 23. “good library business” is about plotting and sticking to the library’s commitment to student learning<br />
    24. 24. assessment is often the missing piece in our collaborative efforts with classroom teachers<br />Source: Harada & Yoshina, 2006<br />
    25. 25. forms of assessment<br />2<br />CC image via http://goo.gl/zOduy<br />
    26. 26. formative assessment: <br />the measurement of knowledge and skills during the process of learning<br />Source: Stripling, 2007/2009, pp. 167-68<br />
    27. 27. Formative Assessment<br />Formative assessments engage the school library media specialist, classroom teacher, and student in thinking about the learning process while it is happening so that adjustments can be made if needed<br />Ongoing and reflective in nature<br />Frames teachers and students as partners in learning<br />Source: Stripling, 2007/2009, pp. 167-68<br />
    28. 28. Examples of Teacher Led Formative Assessments<br />Checklists<br />Rubrics<br />Exit cards or slips<br />Observation checklists<br />“Consultations” or mini-interviews<br />Source: Stripling, 2007/2009, pp. 167-68<br />
    29. 29. Examples of Student Led Formative Assessments<br />Reflecting (learning logs or blogs, notetaking)<br />Video recorded reflections/narratives<br />Graphic organizers (KWL charts, concept maps/mind mapping, idea webs)<br />Questions<br />Sharing, Reciprocal Teaching<br />Peer Review<br />Source: Stripling, 2007/2009, pp. 167-68<br />
    30. 30. summative assessment is the measurement of knowledge and skills at the end of a process of learning in order to determine the amount and <br /> quality of learning<br />Source: Stripling, 2007/2009, pp. 167-68<br />
    31. 31. Summative Assessments<br />Presentations<br />Portfolios<br />Text based papers <br />Reflective narratives<br />Multimedia creations (Voice Thread, Video, Glogster)<br />Tests/Exams<br />Performance based tasks<br />Source: Stripling, 2007/2009, pp. 167-68<br />
    32. 32. What formative and summative assessment are you using or Would you like to try in 2011-12?<br />Share and Discuss<br />
    33. 33. Poll Question 2<br />How often do students engage in formative or summative self-assessments?<br />
    34. 34. student self-assessment: who is in charge of your learning?<br />
    35. 35. Standards for the 21st Century Learner in Action<br />Original photography by Buffy J. Hamilton<br />
    36. 36. Benefits of Student Self-Assessment<br />Encourages participatory learning<br />Increases intrinsic motivation<br />Helps students construct new meanings<br />Helps cultivate a sense of ownership of learning and agency over learning environment<br />Source: Harada, 2010<br />
    37. 37. Possibilities for Self Assessments<br />Forms of formative assessment can be adapted<br />Students can participate in evaluating themselves with a rubric<br />Transforming traditional types of self-assessment tools into virtual learning spaces <br />Source: Harada, 2010<br />
    38. 38. CC image via http://goo.gl/tiSB7<br />
    39. 39. 3<br />incorporating assessment into the collaborative instructional design process<br />
    40. 40. “the shift from a teaching focus to a learning focus is a crucial one” violet harada<br />CC image via http://www.flickr.com/photos/margolove/1810357551/sizes/l/<br />
    41. 41. school librarians must engage in evidence based practice<br />
    42. 42. identify specific learning <br />targets<br />Source: Harada & Yoshina, 2006<br />
    43. 43. look for criteria to help us assess how well students achieve the targets and state the criteria clearly in terms of desired behavior using language students can understand<br />Source: Harada & Yoshina, 2006<br />CC image via http://goo.gl/AlAQC<br />
    44. 44. select a strategy or tool to conduct the assessment<br />Source: Harada & Yoshina, 2006<br />CC image via http://goo.gl/wX9UI<br />
    45. 45. design a performance task for students demonstrating their achievement of a learning target<br />Source: Harada & Yoshina, 2006<br />CC image via http://goo.gl/Aiwh0<br />
    46. 46. these “snapshots” of student work provide us concrete evidence to adjust our instruction and better meet learner needs<br />Source: Harada & Yoshina, 2006<br />CC image via http://goo.gl/hdoH7<br />
    47. 47. how does this process look in real world practice?<br />CC image via http://www.flickr.com/photos/nhuisman/3168683736/sizes/l/<br />
    48. 48. Designing Learning with Backwards Design<br />What do we want students to learn?(standards and objectives)<br />How will we know if learning has taken place? (Assessment tools or strategies)<br />How will we facilitate the learning process?(Shared responsibility of the school librarian, classroom teacher, and student)<br />Source: Pappas, 2008/2009, p. 180<br />
    49. 49. Contents of a Lesson/Unit Template<br />Title of Lesson<br />Grade Level/Subject Area<br />Content standards, including benchmarks<br />Information literacy standards<br />Source: Harada, 2007<br />
    50. 50. Contents of a Lesson/Unit Template<br />Specific learning targets<br />Criteria to assess achievement of the learning target<br />Performance task or object that will be assessed<br />Tool to use in assessing how well students achieve the learning target<br />Source: Harada, 2007<br />
    51. 51. Contents of a Lesson/Unit Template<br />Lesson procedure<br />Resources for the lesson<br />Assessment results<br />Reflection on what worked and ways to improve this lesson<br />Source: Harada, 2007<br />
    52. 52. Lesson/Unit Plan Templates<br />Google document may be accessed at http://goo.gl/mlAJT<br />Image credit: School Library Media Activities Monthly, Nov2007, Vol. 24 Issue 3, p21-25, 5p, 2 Illustrations, 2 Charts. Chart; found on p22<br />AASL Learning4Life Action Example Template may be accessed at http://goo.gl/qHHhm<br />
    53. 53. carousel of ideas<br />CC image via http://goo.gl/jZbmh<br />
    54. 54. formative and summative assessments<br />
    55. 55. 1.2.5 Demonstrate adaptability by changing the inquiry focus, questions, resources, or strategies when necessary to achieve success. <br />1.1.9 Collaborate with others to broaden and deepen understanding. <br />conversations via active reflection and metacognition<br />
    56. 56.
    57. 57.
    58. 58.
    59. 59.
    60. 60. google forms<br />
    61. 61. creating conversations for assessment<br />
    62. 62.
    63. 63.
    64. 64.
    65. 65.
    66. 66.
    67. 67. let’s work together<br />CC image via http://goo.gl/C7zHC<br />
    68. 68. closing reflections and conversation<br />CC image via http://goo.gl/OzJ9g<br />
    69. 69. Reflection and Discussion<br />What are you already doing?<br />What questions are going through your<br />mind?<br />What connections do you see in your<br />own situation?<br />What might be your next steps?<br />Source: DuPre, 2008<br />
    70. 70. recommended reads<br />
    71. 71. CC image via http://goo.gl/G4hWF<br />
    72. 72. References<br />Abler, R. (2011, February 15). Why formative assessments matter. Retrieved from Edutopia website: http://www.edutopia.org/‌blog/‌formative-assessments-importance-of-rebecca-alber<br />American Association of School Librarians. (2009). Teaching for learning. In Empowering learners: Guidelines for school library media programs (pp. 19-27). Chicago: Author.<br />DuPre, C. (2008, February). Assessing student learning in the school library media center. Conference presentation presented at ECU Librarian to Librarian Networking Summit.<br />Available at http://www.ecu.edu/‌cs-lib/‌trc/‌upload/‌Assessing_Student_Learning_in_the_School_Library-2.pdf<br />
    73. 73. References<br />Harada, V. H. (2007, November). From eyeballing to evidence: assessing for learning in hawaii library media centers. School Library Monthly, 24(3), 21-25. Retrieved from http://proxygsu-sche.galileo.usg.edu/‌login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/‌login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=27400685&site=ehost-live<br />Harada, V. H. (2010, June). Self-assessment: Challenging students to take charge of learning. School Library Monthly, 26(10), 13-15. Retrieved from http://proxygsu-sche.galileo.usg.edu/‌login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/‌login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=51003266&site=ehost-live<br />Harada, V. H., & Yoshina, J. M. (2006, March). Assessing learning: The missing piece in instruction? School Library Monthly, 22(7). Retrieved from http://www.schoollibrarymonthly.com/‌articles/‌Harada2006v22n7p20.html<br />
    74. 74. References<br />Harada, V. H., & Zmuda, A. (2008, April). Reframing the library media specialist as a learning specialist. School Library Monthly, 24(8). Retrieved from http://www.schoollibrarymonthly.com/‌articles/‌Zmuda&Harada2008v24nn8p42.html.<br />Pappas, M. L. (2009). Designing learning for evidence-based practice. In K. Fontichiaro (Ed.), 21st century learning in school libraries (pp. 180-184). Santa Barbara, CA: Libraries Unlimited. (Reprinted from School Library Media Activities Monthly, 2008, January, 24, [5]).<br />Stripling, B. (2009). Assessing information fluency: Gathering evidence of student learning. In K. Fontichiaro (Ed.), 21st century learning in school libraries (pp. 166-170). Santa Barbara, CA: Libraries Unlimited. (Reprinted from School Library Media Activities Monthly, 2007, April, 23, [8]).<br />
    75. 75. contact information<br />buffy.hamilton@gmail.com<br />http://theunquietlibrarian.wordpress.com<br />http://theunquietlibrarian.wikispaces.com<br />

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