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Applying The Principles Of Epigenetics For a R(Evolution) in School Librarianship
 

Applying The Principles Of Epigenetics For a R(Evolution) in School Librarianship

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Presentation to the Fulton County School District School Librarians, March 24, 2010. Please see the resource page at ...

Presentation to the Fulton County School District School Librarians, March 24, 2010. Please see the resource page at http://theunquietlibrarian.wikispaces.com/Applying+The+Principles+Of+Epigenetics+For+a+R(Evolution)+In+School+Librarianship .

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Applying The Principles Of Epigenetics For a R(Evolution) in School Librarianship  Applying The Principles Of Epigenetics For a R(Evolution) in School Librarianship Presentation Transcript

  • Applying the Principles of Epigenetics for a (R)evolution in School Librarianship presented by Buffy J. Hamilton March 24, 2010
  • Darwin’s work teaches that evolutionary genetic changes take place slowly over many years and through natural selection
  • The science of epigenetics disrupts the notion of slow change and the belief that we have little to no control over our genes
  • Epigenetics is study of changes in gene activity that do not involve core alterations to the genetic code but still get passed down to at least one successive generation
  • Cellular changes to the epigenome (the cellular material that sits atop the DNA) can impact genetic material and accelerate significant change to the genome
  • These changes are akin to “flipping a switch” that impact gene expression by turning the genes “on” or “off”
  • Environmental factors or “nurture” like diet, stress, and chemical exposure can “imprint” cellular activity of epigenetic markers
  • The simple chemistry of a methyl group attaching itself to a specific spot on the gene changes gene expression; gene expression is either silenced or amplified
  • Epigenetics implies we may be able to exercise control over over genes
  • The promise of epigenetics: the potential to mitigate or cure ailments and harness the power of beneficial gene expression
  • What can we as librarians glean from the study of epigenetics?
  • We can look for external changes and influences to help our profession not just survive but to flourish in harsh conditions
    • Creativity
    • Leadership
    • Innovation
    • Curiosity
    • Passion
    • Teacher
    • Learner
    • Sponsor of multiple literacies
    • Change agent
    • Pioneer
    • Open to change
    • Risk-taking
    • Agility
    • Information maven
    • Advocate
    • Play/playfulness
    Librarianship genes we want to express
  • Lack of full funding and budget cuts have “silenced” many of our “genes”
  • A climate that values standardized test scores over inquiry has impacted our genes
  • filtering fears are debilitating to our growth Image used under a CC license from http://www.flickr.com/photos/sziszo/2592916753/sizes/o/
  • A shift in who counts as experts and the decision making model has met some hostile environments
  • What “epigenetic” changes and influences can accelerate our ability to adapt to a changing educational landscape?
  • 1 Make our practice transparent to the world Image used under a CC license from http:/www.flickr.com/photos/allaboutgeorge/2361633049/sizes/o/
  • web-based mindmap
  • flickr
  • youtube
  • twitter
  • facebook
  • blog
  • transparency and data
  • transparency and data
  • share your practice via social media
  • embrace instructional leadership
  • cc licensed flickr photo by Suttonhoo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/suttonhoo22/2512983749/ 2 Create and nurture a participatory culture that invites conversations for learning
  • 1.1.5 evaluate information found in selected sources on the basis of accuracy, validity, appropriateness for needs, importance, and social and cultural context 1.1.6 read, view, and listen for information presented in any format (e.g., textual, visual, media, digital) in order to make inferences and gather meaning create conversations about information evaluation and social scholarship with research pathfinders
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  • 1.1.9 collaborate with others to broaden and deepen understanding 1.3.4 contribute to the exchange of ideas within the learning community 4.1.7 use social networks and information tools to gather and share information create conversations about collaborative knowledge building using wikis and inquiry based activities
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  • 1.2.5 demonstrate adaptability by changing the inquiry focus, questions, resources, or strategies when necessary to achieve success 1.2.6 display emotional resilience by persisting in information searching despite challenges 1.4.1 monitor own information-seeking processes for effectiveness and progress, and adapt as necessary 4.1.7 use social networks and information tools to gather and share information create conversations about adaptability and research strategies using blogs
  • 1.2.5 Demonstrate adaptability by changing the inquiry focus, questions, resources, or strategies when necessary to achieve success. 1.1.9 Collaborate with others to broaden and deepen understanding.
  • 1.3.3 follow ethical and legal guidelines in gathering and using information create conversations about digital citizenship and ethical use of information
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  • “ I like that I cannot rely on my slides as much.  It requires me to actually learn what my project is about and not just copy and paste a whole paragraph into my power point then read it right off the slide when I am presenting.  I felt that I was more connected to the class while presenting and I really liked that, it made me feel better about myself while I was actually up in front of the class.”
  • 2.1.1 continue an inquiry- based research process by applying critical- thinking skills (analysis, synthesis, evaluation, organization) to information and knowledge in order to construct new understandings, draw conclusions, and create new knowledge 2.1.4 use technology and other information tools to analyze and organize information 3.1.2 participate and collaborate as members of a social and intellectual network of learners. 3.1.1 conclude an inquiry- based research process by sharing new understandings and reflecting on the learning. create conversations about alternate representations of knowledge, organizing knowledge, sharing learning reflections, and sharing resources.
  • voicethread
  • video
  • glogster
  • research portfolio with Google Sites
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  • cloud computing: google docs
  • diigo: group bookmarks
  • evernote: bookmarking and notes
  • netvibes and iGoogle: personal learning environments and learning artifacts
  • 2.1.5 collaborate with others to exchange ideas, develop new understandings, make decisions, and solve problems 3.2.1 demonstrate leadership and confidence by presenting ideas to others in both formal and informal situations 3.2.2 show social responsibility by participating actively with others in learning situations and by contributing questions and ideas during group discussions 4.1.7 use social networks and information tools to gather and share information create conversations about collaboration, leadership, and social responsibility for shared knowledge construction
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  • cc licensed photo from http://www.flickr.com/photos/brandoncripps/3156373103/sizes/o/ 3 Build your collaborative tribe through listening, sharing, and risk-taking
  • planting seeds takes both faith and action
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  • Energize your mind and spirit by tapping into the wisdom of the crowd by growing your personal learning network Image used under a CC license from http://www.flickr.com/photos/alesk/356136498/sizes/l/ 4
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  • 5 Embrace your role as a fearless advocate for intellectual freedom, equitable access to all forms of information, and multiple literacies
  • make the argument for access to a specific resource or tool by collecting examples of effective instructional practice Image used under a CC license from http://www.flickr.com/photos/mymollypop/2646559132/sizes/l/
  • develop and present a concrete plan for use of the resource and how you will implement its use
  • remind decision makers that students need guided instruction and opportunities to learn how to use social media thoughtfully and wisely Image used under a CC license from http://www.flickr.com/photos/imbat/3869056371/sizes/l/
  • tie your requests to performance standards
  • We need nurturing influences on our librarian genes to help us thrive and adapt to today’s information landscape
  • Repeated exposure to healthy influences builds resilience Image used under a cc license from http://www.flickr.com/photos/skeels/141145758/sizes/l/
  • Let us harness the power of positive epigenomic changes in our profession and silence the crippling ones
  • Librarians matter cc licensed photo by http://www.flickr.com/photos/skiwalker79/3855880846/sizes/l/in/photostream/
  • contact information [email_address] http://theunquietlibrarian.wordpress.com http://theunquietlibrarian.wikispaces.com
  • Works Cited Cloud, John. “Why Your DNA Isn’t Your Destiny.” Time . N.p., 6 Jan. 2010. Web. 21 Mar. 2010. <http://www.time.com/‌time/‌printout/‌0,8816,1951968,00.html>.