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Guest Integration Process 2

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Ways that people enter the Davis Park Church of Christ

Ways that people enter the Davis Park Church of Christ

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Guest Integration Process 2 Guest Integration Process 2 Presentation Transcript

  • “Guest Integration Process”Connecting People to Christ
    Davis Park Church of Christ
  • One of the greatest challenges in today's church is keeping people. In order to experience church growth, obviously you have to keep people. There are so many other things that compete for people's time and energy. A church with an assimilation strategy that works will be effective. A successful church is not one that can only bring people in through various events, but a church that can keep people, disciple them, equip them for ministry, and offer opportunities for them to be used in the giftings that God has given them.
  • Healing Yourself
    With God’s Help
    “28”
    Pastoral Counseling
    Friendship
    Fellowship
    Learning About Self
    Small Groups
    Buzz Events
    Compassion Situations
    Disciple
    Retreats
    Davis Park Church of Christ
    Mercy
    Mission
    Ministry
    Putting Others before Self
    Community Response
    CR-28
    Sunday School Teaching
    Connections
    Guest / Welcome
    Special Events
    Maintenance at the Building
  • Entry Points or Portals
  • Organic
    Born and Brought Up
    Raised as a child
    Grandparents, Relatives
  • Invitation
    Invited by a friend
    Invited by a neighbor
    Invited by a family member
    Invited by a small group or bible study
  • Compassion
    Funeral Service
    “28”
    Disaster Response
    Community Service
    Wedding
    Food Distribution
  • Buzz Events
    Community Events:
    Movies
    Comedy Nights
    Concerts
    Trunk or Treat
  • Walk-Ins
    Saw our sign and came in
    Saw our website and visited
    Wondered what was going on in there
  • *Of all those who drop out of active church involvement, over 80% do so in the first year of their membership. The first 12 months are critical for assimilation of the newcomer.
  • The Seven Laws of Assimilation
  • Law #1Visitors Represent 100% of Your Church's Growth Potential
    This first law sounds so simplistic and self evident that one could reasonably wonder why it is mentioned at all.
    Nevertheless, this first law is the beginning point for effective visitor retention and ironically; it is the one that is most commonly ignored by churches.
    Sustained church growth requires a sustained investment outwards, towards your visitors
  • Law #2Visitor Retention is Far More Significant than Visitor Volume.
    The mathematics of church growth, like all mathematical constructs, is unyielding in its objective reality. Those who embrace the veracity of this law will enjoy effective visitor assimilation with predictable long-term results. V
    Visitor retention is somewhere between 10 to 20 times more significant, in terms of church growth, than visitor volume. Yet churches tend to put all of their outreach resources into "the one basket" of increasing visitor volume and very little into visitor retention.
  • Law #3It Takes People to Reach People
    Programs do not reach people. Mass mailings, impassioned pulpit announcements, multimedia and slick advertising collateral are not enough to reliably connect newcomers into "places of belonging" in your church..
    Effective visitor retention methodology must incorporate a plan to recruit, train, mobilize and motivate church members to personally care for outsiders.
  • Law #4Set Expectations and Meet Them
    People do not like surprises, excepting the occasional party from very close friends or family.
    Be honest with your visitors about your intentions from your first contact with them
    Visitors are generally very appreciative and happy to receive a phone call from the church if the church has been forthright about their intentions.
    Set expectations that you are a caring church and then fulfill them with loving contacts. It works!
  • Law #5Be Proactive to Connect People
    Visitor assimilation begins as a matter of stewardship towards those whom God brings to the front doors of your church. Without intentional effort, a church will become more and more focused inward on its congregants. This is a natural sociological phenomenon. Laypersons and leaders in a church will never automatically prioritize their attention on outsiders. It takes intentional leadership to transform a church from a passive mindset to a proactive posture towards outsiders.
  • Law #6It Takes Time to Win People
    The research shows the more a visitor visits a church the greater the odds are that they will eventually become a part of that church. Yet, churches consistently behave in ways that ignore this critical fact. For example, churches often place all of their efforts in the first time visitor.
    Reality is that churches will receive a far greater return on investments that they make in 2nd and 3rd and subsequent visitors.
    What is lacking in many visitor assimilation efforts is the ability to direct and mobilize key resources to repeat visitors. Sustained follow up is essential to effective visitor assimilation.
  • Law #7Listen to Your Visitors
    The adage is true that it is impossible to see yourself in the same way that others see you. The same principle applies to a church, only in greater measure. Over time churches become places that are comfortable to insiders and future direction is largely driven by their needs, wants and desires.
    Insiders feel at home so they assume that outsiders should feel the same way. It is no wonder that there is often a stark contrast between the way insiders and outsiders view the same church. Insiders cannot possibly have an accurate view of the way outsiders see them without a solid and reliable feedback mechanism in place.
  • Things to remember concerning Visitors
    First impressions count - initial impulses toward belonging draw people closer or make them feel more distant
    Imagine that every person wears a sign that says I need to feel important!" Ushers need to take charge of visitors, calling them by name. People in the church need to greet visitors by name.
    New members (or even regular visitors) may be enlisted as greeters and ushers. This way all might learn each others' names.
    Remember, some people prefer anonymity. Ushers and greeters need to be sensitive to this possibility.
  • Four Keys of Assimilation
    Expectation –One of the key commonalities among the churches was a sense of expectation of members and prospective members. Church membership was not the placement of a name on a roll; the clear expectation was that the member was to make a difference through the ministries of the church. Giving was not touted as optional but expected among church members. And membership or inquirer classes were often the place where these expectations were most clearly articulated.
  • Ministry involvement. If a church member does not become meaningfully involved in some type of ministry in the church, his or her drop-out chances increase dramatically.
    The church leadership cannot delay in moving new members to places of ministry.
    If more than six months lapses between the points of new membership to ministry involvement, the person will likely be already moving toward inactivity in the life of the church.
  • Relationships. What many church leaders do not realize is that the development of these relationships with new members best takes place before the member joins.
    If the new member has no relationship with a church member when he or she joins the church, it is exceedingly difficult to create relationships. Such is the reason why it is critically important for church members to become highly intentional about developing relationships with unchurched persons before that person ever visits the church.
  • Small-group involvement. There are many venues for such involvement: discipleship groups, home cell groups, ministry teams, and choirs and praise teams, to name a few.
    Research shows that the most effective assimilation group is the Sunday school, which is the open-ended small group that typically meets on the church campus.
    A person involved in a Sunday school class is five times more likely to be active in the church five years later, than a person who attends worship services alone.
  • Paul Sorensen from Community Church of Joy reports, "Thirty-four percent of first-time guests who get a call from the pastor within 2 days will return next Sunday. But if they receive a call from a layperson, 68 percent will come back."7 
  • Strategies for Assimilation
  • First Time Visitor
    Members of the congregation take responsibility for each guest.
    These members telephone the guests Sunday afternoon and let them know how glad they are they attended and offer to answer any questions about the service or church.
    On Monday, the pastor sends a letter to all guests thanking them for attending and encouraging them to return.
    On Monday or Tuesday night, a guest assimilation team drops by the homes of those who visited on Sunday for a 15-second front door visit. The team leaves a gift and literature about the church.
    Add guests to the church's mailing list.
    On Friday or Saturday, the guest assimilation team members who are responsible for guests, telephone guests and invite them to the Sunday services and encourage them to attend a Welcome Class or an adult Bible fellowship group.
  • Guest follow-up of Second-time Visitor
    Guests receive a telephone call on Sunday afternoon from the same person who called the first time.
    A letter encouraging them to join an adult Bible fellowship or other small group is sent from the pastor with a list of options.
    On Friday or Saturday, an adult Bible fellowship or small group leader telephones and invites them to attend his or her group as the leader's special guest.
  • Guest follow-up for third-time visitors
    Guests receive a telephone call Sunday afternoon from the same person who did the previous Sunday calls.
    The pastor sends a letter encouraging them to attend a reception to become acquainted with others who are new to the church.
  • GUEST ASSIMILATION MINISTRY STRATEGY PART 2: BE INTENTIONAL AT BUILDING RELATIONSHIPS
    The use of adult Bible fellowships and other small groups is vital to retaining guests. The sooner guests are active in a group in the church, the sooner they will move from being outsiders to insiders. It is imperative that from the first visit your assimilation strategy seeks to move them into active participation with others from the church. 
  • GUEST ASSIMILATION MINISTRY STRATEGY PART 2: BE INTENTIONAL AT BUILDING RELATIONSHIPS
    The use of adult Bible fellowships and other small groups is vital to retaining guests. The sooner guests are active in a group in the church, the sooner they will move from being outsiders to insiders. It is imperative that from the first visit your assimilation strategy seeks to move them into active participation with others from the church. 
  • Comment on the Assimilation Process 
    A new member does not automatically mean an active member.
    There is a "back door" which active members can go through.
    The longer a person is inactive, the more difficult it is to re-activate them.
    Different re-activation strategies are required for different kinds of inactive members.
  • Connection Process
    Integration of
    Guests into Local
    Congregation
    Recognition by current members
    That someone new has arrived .
    Process of helping guests
    feel welcome and oriented
    In regards to classes, locations
    Arrival on the Campus
  • WalK-In
    Buzz Eventts
    Compassion
    Davis Park
    Church of Christ
    Mercy
    Enter Parking Lot
    Greeters
    Mission
    Connection Center
    Information
    Organic
    Front Door
    Back Door
    Guides
    Ministry
    Invitation
  • Guest Connection Ministry
    Ministers
    Elders
  • WalK-In
    Disheartened
    displaced
    Buzz Events
    Compassion
    Davis Park Church of Christ
    Mercy
    Ministry
    Front Door
    Organic
    Disconnected
    Back Door
    Mission
    Disenfranchised
    Invitation
    Disgruntled
  • Disheartened
    Wandering away from God and the church because of pain
    Pain may be from external sources. (sources outside the church)
    Sources may be from inside the church
  • Displaced
    Wandering away from God and Church because circumstances make them feel out of place or pushed away from other members of the church.
  • Disconnected
    Wandering away from God and the Church because there appears to be no connection between them and other members, or them and the leadership of the church.
  • Disenfranchised
    Wandering away from God and the church because of disagreement with the vision or the direction the church is heading or may be heading.
  • Disgruntled
    Wandering away from God and the Church because of dissatisfaction, anger or unhappiness with things, directions, doctrine, etc.
  • Disheartened
    Ministry
    Team
    Members
    displaced
    Elders
    Davis Park
    Church of Christ
    Mercy
    Friends and
    Family
    Mission
    Front Door
    Ministry
    Staff
    Back Door
    Disconnected
    Small Group
    Leaders and members
    Ministry
    Disenfranchised
    Deacons
    Worship
    Proximity
    Friends
    Safety Net
    Disgruntled
  • The Safety Net
    Ministry Team Members
    Friends and Family
    Small Group Members and Leaders
    Worship Proximity Friends
    Elders
    Deacons
    Ministry Staff
  • The Safety Net
    Persons who should intervene when people with in the congregation began to show signs that their walk with God is in jeopardy.
    Intervention should consist of some of the following:
    Prayer for the person or with the person
    Phone calls to check on the person
    Mediation of the situation
    Organize search or help groups to reclaim the person who is teetering on the edge.
    Help the individual find the right resource for the problem
  • 7 Laws of Member Retention
  • Law #1 – Love Them or Lose Them
    Are the right messages being conveyed and the proper ministries developed so that members/adherents feel loved? The old adage is true, perception is reality. Words are important.
    While words are important, the pastor’s actions will speak even louder. Do members have confidence that their needs will be known and timely pastoral care will be available in their time of need? Have adequate efforts been made to develop care ministries within the church or does the focus seem to be directed at other matters?
  • Law #2 – Invest in Member Retention
    Member retention is far more significant than visitor volume. Depending on your church’s visitor assimilation rate, it takes a lot of visitors to make one church adherent. Know the math. Member/adherent retention is somewhere between 10 to 20 times more significant, in terms of church growth, than visitor volume. Yet churches tend to put huge investments in visitor volume through advertising and large events and a disproportionately low amount of their resources into retaining their members/adherents. There are a number of reasons for this.
  • Adherents slip out the back door largely unnoticed in the first few months of their attendance, making this a silent enemy of church growth. Few churches have adequate systems in place to monitor back door attrition. Very few churches indeed have a proactive member/adherent retention ministry that identifies early symptoms of attrition and mobilizes interventions in time to make a difference. Balance the church’s investments to provide adequate resources for member retention.
     
  • Law #3Empower Members to Care for Members
    The level of pastoral care that a professional pastor can provide, except in the smallest of churches, always pales in comparison to the kind of care that a church body can provide for itself through small groups and well executed care ministries. This truth reflects a biblical principal that is clearly taught in Ephesians Chapter 4. “…the whole body, being fitted and held together by what every joint supplies, according to the proper working of each individual part, causes the growth of the body” Notice that it does not say “by what every pastor supplies.”
  • A church’s body, by design, dispenses life from joint to joint as is patterned in nature. The “joints” are the contact points or relationships between member and member. This decentralized functionality runs counter to the intuitive instincts of many pastors who view the pulpit as the focal point for dispensing life to the church. Increase your member retention by using your pulpit to empower members to connect in meaningful relationships where they can share the life of Christ. Promote the biblical pattern/mandate of small group involvement, “Day by day…breaking bread from house to house, they were taking their meals together with gladness and sincerity of heart.” Acts 2.46
  • Law #4 Define Assimilation Expectations
    Everyone in a church needs to know what it means for a congregant to be fully assimilated into their church. Make the end objective and the processes involved to get there very clear.
    The difference between excellence and mediocrity in assimilation lies in ministry design and implementation. Do you have a bombproof and automated methodology in place that monitors and drives your congregants through every stage of assimilation?
  • The task of assimilation is not over until all the steps have been competed. You have to fully assimilate them before you can retain them. Churches that would enjoy high member retention must first invest significant energies and resources into the assimilation process. Once assimilated, the task of member retention is never over. You need a well designed early monitoring system to target those who are disengaging from full assimilation so they can be proactively re-engaged.
  • Law #5Use Them Or Lose Them
    It is essential to the spiritual health of every believer that they develop into a functional member of the Body of Christ. Functional means that they are not just passive consumers of Kingdom resources but they become active in service which in turn makes them a valued Kingdom resource. Nature teaches that members of a body that cease to function atrophy and become a burden to the whole system. When this reaches critical mass congregational morale plummets in the few who feel they are “doing all the work.”
  • Nothing closes the back door more firmly for people than the conviction that they are making real spiritual progress at their church. These people become raving fans that not only increase member retention but also visitor volume by communicating their excitement with outsiders. Churches that provide an atmosphere that is highly conducive to spiritual growth have a few key commonalities. Growth means that the Bible becomes relevant to the daily lives of congregants. Maintaining the weekly discipline of sermon preparation has to be a top priority of the pastor.
  • Want a happy and contented church with high levels of member retention?
    Help your congregants find a place of meaningful Kingdom service and experience the incredible fulfillment that comes from making a difference for eternity.
    Help them to discover their God-given gifts and where they can best fit in the ministries of the church.
    Work ceaselessly to create new ministries and ministry positions that provide an ever increasingly rich environment for Kingdom service.
    Develop marketing channels and a strong competency to market ministry opportunities to your congregants.
  • Law #6Grow Them
    Nothing closes the back door more firmly for people than the conviction that they are making real spiritual progress at their church. These people become raving fans that not only increase member retention but also visitor volume by communicating their excitement with outsiders. Churches that provide an atmosphere that is highly conducive to spiritual growth have a few key commonalities.
  • Growth means that the Bible becomes relevant to the daily lives of congregants. Maintaining the weekly discipline of sermon preparation has to be a top priority of the pastor. The message is not complete without a practical sermon application that integrates truth into the daily lives of your congregation.
  • Growth means that worship fills the heart of the believer as they grasp the personal nature of God’s love for them. Spiritual awareness blossoms and worshippers begin to change from the inside out. The church needs to provide heartfelt corporate worship that fans this spark into a flame. Growth means that the believer has become engaged in spiritually meaningfully relationships with other Christians on a regular basis. These relationships provide mutual support, accountability and opportunities to minister
  • Law #7Speak Clearly and Often
    Pastors need to communicate clearly and often to their congregations. Three formidable monsters live in the realm of poor communications. They are called assumptions, intentions and expectations. Say what you will do, when you will do it and how you will do it. Then do it that way. Be predictable. Jesus put it this way, “Let your yes be yes.”
    Accept the consequences of your words especially when circumstances make it uncomfortable to follow through. When the pastor communicates clearly, in a timely fashion, and always follows through, it builds trust and confidence in leadership which greatly increases member retention.