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NCEA Level 3 - Visual Arts 2013
Examples of Candidate Work – 91456 Painting
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Excellence
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Excellence
As with many folios where abstract painting is undertaken, this one begins with a
phase of works devoted to g...
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6
7
Excellence
Strong narrative drives the work in this folio. The work expresses the candidate’s
response to ecological iss...
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Merit
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Merit
This folio is one that could cause markers to sigh and say, “It just takes too long to
get there”. The suite of g...
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15
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Merit
This project shows the candidate’s clarity of purpose - a simple idea drawn from
images of birds on power lines w...
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Achieved
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Achieved
Painting folios that use a number of photographic images have troubled markers over
recent years. This is poss...
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25
Achieved
This folio reveals a candidate working hard to develop a visual vocabulary to
represent what seems a complex t...
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Level3 painting-2013

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Level3 painting-2013

  1. 1. 1 NCEA Level 3 - Visual Arts 2013 Examples of Candidate Work – 91456 Painting
  2. 2. 2 Excellence
  3. 3. 3 Excellence As with many folios where abstract painting is undertaken, this one begins with a phase of works devoted to gathering subject matter derived from observations of objects or scenes. The folio uses a traditional Modernist method of drawing subject matter from architectural photographs and then reducing information to linear geometric compositions. Manipulations of colour and tone are used to experiment with figure and ground relationships. Panel 2 shows increasing focus on shifting use of media; using opaque paint with hints of impasto. Varying and increasing weights of line become shapes and forms within the works. Ten phases of working systematically develop the pictorial vocabulary. These phases show how the ideas are rephrased and built upon. Final, larger works show refined emphasis on materiality and interplay of surface within the compositions. Like many other good submissions in 2013 and in previous years, the simple painterly vocabulary of this folio is well understood by the candidate. Although restrained, the candidate is able to develop a substantial range of options through Panel 1 which are analysed and prioritised in panel 2.
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  7. 7. 7 Excellence Strong narrative drives the work in this folio. The work expresses the candidate’s response to ecological issues in relation to endangered animals. Such folios are often troubled by too literal a sense of storytelling. It can become difficult for the candidate to think clearly about developing a pictorial idea because they are too busy trying to tell the story. This is not the case with this folio. Here individual works make politicised jokes referring to the plight of selected animals at the hands of human culture. The basic elements of the vocabulary that link each work to another are tested and refined while still keeping the visual puns coming. There is a poignancy to the work. There is a wit to it as well which comes from the ‘sculptural’ assembling and rendering. The project develops well as the montaging of flat and illusory elements are investigated as the assemblage continues. The large work on panel 3 deftly combines imagery from earlier works to form the scientific cross-section work as a grand finale. This is nicely done. (A minor point: the suite of drawings at the top of panel 1 are redundant since it is clear throughout that the candidate has an interest in particular subject matter and can render the illusion of objects.)
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  11. 11. 11 Merit
  12. 12. 12 Merit This folio is one that could cause markers to sigh and say, “It just takes too long to get there”. The suite of generative works on panel 1 successfully provides the candidate with ideas for media treatment, style and spatial dynamics. Within the constraints and possibilities of the folio format, time (or space) is of the essence. The more investigative work on panel 2 suggests a struggle to get to grips with these spatial dynamics and the scale within the pictures. First the figures are too close, then too far away, then the work gets too flat and graphic. Things start to come right at the bottom of panel 2 as the overlay of translucent elements start to work together. The last two works on panel 3 are very good. The horizontal format of stretched and morphed space allows the candidate to integrate the pictures. The figures define the scale of the space and activate the graphic and 3-d elements into a kind of mindscape. Continued reinvestigation and refinement of these latter works, and the removal of less successful works in panel 2 might have netted a better result. It is difficult to tell if this lapse was caused by lack of time before the submission deadline, or lack of ability to detect the lapse as the project developed.
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  16. 16. 16 Merit This project shows the candidate’s clarity of purpose - a simple idea drawn from images of birds on power lines where the linear and spatial qualities of this imagery are translated into a painterly vocabulary. Also evident is a decisive method of developing the pictorial idea. Each phase of working proceeds systematically from the previous one. The candidate demonstrates some ability to analyse and clarify the options and to develop alternatives, such as the introduction of the blue (sky) horizontal forms on panel 3 which deepen and activate the spatial depth of the paintings. A possible struggle lies with the candidate’s apparent lack of experience in linear mark making and their handling of translucent colour sufficient to develop and control fluent interplays of the formal elements in the work. In some works the transitions across the pictures and of figure and ground are awkward. Those in panel 3 improve as the surface is treated to more paint and the pictures become more saturated.
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  20. 20. 20 Achieved
  21. 21. 21 Achieved Painting folios that use a number of photographic images have troubled markers over recent years. This is possibly due to the possible use of photography to mask or compensate for students’ lack of ability to draw and paint realistically. In some instances, candidates make no attempt to mask such a lack. Rather they use photographic imagery as such to produce inference of realist space and forms. In this particular folio, there is no attempt at disguise and the candidate makes simple visual puns through a collage of photos and graphic greys and black and white. The work is sufficiently systematic and generative but it is limited in the extent to which ideas are analysed and developed. There is one option of playing with scale - the big hand plucks or stretches the beasts, another where the beasts slip through graduated stripes, and still another where beasts and people are in a jumbled wrestle. The use of the photos and simple grey painting is natty, but it is a lapse that the candidate did not include painted beasts and humans or collage photographic greys to extend and deepen the play. It cannot be seen if the candidate is unable to handle such an integration of media to advance the idea, or if they simply failed to recognise the need for it. The folio does not present sufficient evidence of analysis and evaluation, nor of an understanding of established methods in painting to get it beyond an achievement grade.
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  25. 25. 25 Achieved This folio reveals a candidate working hard to develop a visual vocabulary to represent what seems a complex theme around human and animal interdependence. Throughout panels and 1 and 2, there is a mingling of generative works and images that record subject matter and experiment with style and media treatments. There is possibly too much space in the folio given to such works, and as the pictorial idea gains clarity at the bottom of panel 2, there is insufficient space give to works that develop, test and refine this idea. Again, the candidate appears to have a lack of experience in drawing/rendering figures. This lack makes it difficult for the candidate to develop ideas they may have in language into visual forms. The latter works in the folio begin to integrate montaged elements and here some of the candidate’s purpose and ability to combine shifting scale and spaces emerges. Here too, a sense of the systematic emerges, and some of the thematic content becomes retrievable.
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