2010 printmaking

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Unit for 2.2 printmaking

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2010 printmaking

  1. 1. 2010 Internal Assessment Resource Subject Reference : Visual Art 2.2 Internal assessment resource reference number: Visual Art/2/2- G version 4 “Identity in Print” Supports internal assessment for: Achievement Standard: 90478 version 2 Title: Generate and develop ideas using drawing processes and procedures in print. Credits: 6 Date version published: April 2005 Ministry of Education For use in internal assessment quality assurance status from 2005 Adapted for use at One Tree Hill College, 2010
  2. 2. Student Instruction Sheet <ul><li>Completion Date: Week 8 Term 1 </li></ul><ul><li>Submission Date: Week 8 Term 2 </li></ul><ul><li>____________________________________________ </li></ul><ul><li>This Achievement Standard requires generating and developing ideas using drawing methods related to established practice, and using drawing materials, processes and techniques with skills appropriate to printmaking. </li></ul><ul><li>You will generate and develop ideas for printmaking. You will use a study of artists’ works to clarify ideas using techniques and conventions appropriate to printmaking. You will need to provide evidence showing how this has been done through drawings and prints. </li></ul>
  3. 3. There are four tasks within this Assessment. <ul><li>Task 1: Research and Generating Ideas 6 hours </li></ul><ul><li>Task 2: Generating and Developing Ideas 10 hours </li></ul><ul><li>Task 3: Techniques and Processes of Artist Models 6 hours </li></ul><ul><li>Task 4: Analysing and Clarifying Ideas 13 hours </li></ul><ul><li>You will submit this work at the end of Term 1 and will have no further assessment opportunities throughout the year. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Task 1: Researching and Generating Ideas (6 Hours) <ul><li>The title for this page is ‘Whakapapa’. Fine the meanings for each of the following words: whakapapa, waka, maunga, awa, iwi. As a class we will discuss the significance of these words </li></ul><ul><li>Draw a family tree that traces back to your great-grandparents for both sides of your family – your mother’s side and your father’s side. This is a shortened version of your whakapapa. If you can go further back, make your tree show more information and more relatives. </li></ul><ul><li>You will need to find the names of your waka ( the boat or plane you or your relatives arrived into New Zealand on or in) your maunga, (the mountain closest to your family’s place of origin) your awa (the river closest to your family’s place of origin) and your iwi ( the tribe or family you come from) You may choose to use information gathered from either your mother’s or your father’s side, or both. If you come from another country, you may still be able to gather the same information. You may also identify your whakapap within your immediate surroundings so your information will be based on where you live and even your school. Make sure you ask your family to help you in your research for this task. </li></ul><ul><li>NB. All examples of student work by Sarah Stewart. 2005 </li></ul>
  5. 6. Transfer this information to the following: (the statement on the left is in Maori and the statement on the right is the English translation) <ul><li>Ko…………………..taku ingoa My name is ………………………… </li></ul><ul><li>Ko…………………..te waka …………………………is my canoe </li></ul><ul><li>Ko…………………..te maunga ………………………is my mountain </li></ul><ul><li>Ko…………………..te awa ……………………………is my river </li></ul><ul><li>Ko…………………..te iwi …………………………….is my tribe </li></ul>
  6. 8. <ul><li>Draw a series of small sketches of symbols relating to your waka, maunga, awa, and iwi. These may be symbols or taken from actual objects or places. </li></ul><ul><li>Evidence may include: </li></ul><ul><li>Photocopies or photographs of actual objects </li></ul><ul><li>Written notes describing object, its significance and why you chose it. </li></ul><ul><li>Maps or charts, travel brochures, plane tickets, boat tickets car licence etc </li></ul><ul><li>NB If you are drawing from books you need to include a bibliography. </li></ul>
  7. 9. Student Work: Sara Stewart 2005
  8. 10. Task 2: Generating and Developing Ideas (based on artist models) Concepts <ul><li>You have approximately 10 hours of classroom and homework time to complete this task. </li></ul><ul><li>This task involves selecting an artist model(s) and completing a series of related ‘Identity’ drawings . </li></ul><ul><li>Produce a series of small related drawings that analyse how at least 2 artists have used references to their whakapapa in their work. At least 1 of your artist must belong to a culture you identify yourself with. (Could just be a New Zealander) You need to draw a minimum of 1 studies per artist. – 4 drawings in all. </li></ul><ul><li>Examples of New Zealand and International Artist Models who have used ‘Identity’ as subject matter include: Phillip Clairmont,( NZ) Fatu Feu’u (Samoan) Nigel Brown, (NZ) Michel Tuffrey (Samoan), Paratene Matchitt (Maori), Claudia Pond Eyley (NZ), , Ernst Ludwig Kirchner( European), Van Gogh, (European) Shane Cotton (Maori), John Pule (Niuean), Roby Kahukiwa (Maori), Richard Killeen (NZ) Seraphine Pick (NZ) </li></ul>
  9. 11. Michel Tuffery was born in 1966 in Wellington, Aotearoa/New Zealand and currently lives and works there. An artist of Samoan, Tahitian and Cook Island descent , the artist’s work is a public outlet for the personal exploration of the many dimensions of his cultural background. He has stated &quot;I am using traditional design motifs, stories, dances and songs in a contemporary way.&quot;  Tuffery regularly involves the pacific island communities in his performance works. In small groups, discuss what traditional item this work is based on and the materials it is made of. Make notes on the group ‘dump’ sheet, then transfer them onto this page. Now draw the image in the picture box provided on the right and colour carefully. Pacific Artist Michel Tuffrey Notes about Michel’s work…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
  10. 12. John Pule: Born in Niue, a small nation in the Pacific,  John Pule  moved with his family to Auckland, New Zealand at the age of two.  Mythology and history are of specific interest to John as he weaves fish, people and birdlike creatures into a very personal response to the colonisation of the Pacific. In small groups, discuss what traditional item this work is based on and the materials it is made of. Make notes on the group ‘dump’ sheet, then transfer them onto this page. Now draw the image in the picture box provided on the right. Take care to ‘grid’ your composition and colour carefully. Pacific Artist John Pule Notes about John Pule’s work ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..
  11. 13. Contrast & Compare: Create word banks to illustrate the similarities & differences between the 2 works Similarities Differences N Brown, Seven Last Words 1, hand coloured lithograph, 335 x 240mm M Tuffrey: Tianiga, 1989
  12. 14. <ul><li>Further research possibilities </li></ul><ul><li>Prints and printmakers from Australia, Papua, New Guinea, Japan and Europe. An excellent book for this task is </li></ul><ul><li>Butiter, Rl., (2001) ‘Islands in the sun – Prints by Indigenous artists of Australia and the Australasian Region’ National Gallery of Australia, Canberra. </li></ul>
  13. 15. <ul><li>Concepts </li></ul><ul><li>Produce a series of small drawings (6x A6) using the styles of the artists you have chosen but the subject matter will be derived from your research and symbols of waka, maunga, awa and iwi. Your drawings could show the following: </li></ul><ul><li>Perspective and Scale </li></ul><ul><li>Application of media </li></ul><ul><li>Style of chosen artists. </li></ul><ul><li>symbols of your waka, maunga, awa and iwi. </li></ul>
  14. 17. <ul><li>Developments: </li></ul><ul><li>You need to develop at least 4 works (A5). </li></ul><ul><li>From these 4 developments choose one you think will work as a woodcut. Use the work of Schmidt-Rotluff; see below (Expressionist) to guide you in determining relief areas (black these in with ink/brush or pencil) and cut areas (white. leave these unmarked, but you can use markmaking to show where your cuts will be) </li></ul>
  15. 18. Wood or Linocut The Expressionists made prints (mostly woodcuts) as well as paintings. The woodcut technique helped them to work quickly and directly onto the block. The images were very dramatic in their contrasts of dark and light and were often printed in stark black and white. The cut lines could be used to exaggerate the forms and planes
  16. 20. Task 3: Techniques and Processes of Artist Models (Develop and clarify ideas) <ul><li>You have approximately 6 hours of classroom and homework time to complete this task. </li></ul><ul><li>In this task your teacher will provide: </li></ul><ul><li>Information Examples of Woodcut, Relief print,, Collagraph and Mono-printing techniques. You will explore at least two of these techniques. Write the process of the selected approaches in your Visual Diary to refer to in Task 3 </li></ul><ul><li>Using this research, (practical exploration) and information complete the following: </li></ul><ul><li>A monoprint </li></ul><ul><li>A woodcut. </li></ul><ul><li>(if you have time) A Collograph </li></ul>
  17. 21. <ul><li>Transfer your drawing to the block. </li></ul><ul><li>The quickest way to do this is to shade the back of your paper with chalk or soft pencil. </li></ul><ul><li>Place your image onto the woodblock, chalk side facing the block </li></ul><ul><li>Draw over the outlines firmly to transfer them to the wood or lino </li></ul>
  18. 24. For textured prints <ul><li>Make a collection of textures to use as your printing surfaces. This may include fabric, different types of paper, leaves, etc. If your textures are coloured, the colours must relate to the colours used in your artist model studies. </li></ul>
  19. 29. <ul><li>Linocut, Clairmont, 1976 </li></ul>Black areas have not been cut, white areas are the areas that have been cut
  20. 32. Task 4: Analysing and Clarifying Ideas <ul><li>Transfer drawing to woodcut board </li></ul><ul><li>Print 1 quality print using only black printing ink </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1 x print on quality white paper (black on white) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>4 x colour prints paper (You will need to print at least 2 x copies of each colour (see Michel Tuffrey’s work) leave one aside, and print the other one after making new cut. Repeat the process for each colour used </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Final prints are to be presented for assessment on an A1 Board </li></ul>
  21. 33. Assessment Schedule: AS90478 Visual Art/2/2 – G version 4: “Identity in Print” The student is able to: Generate, develop, critically analyse and clarify ideas in a related series of Identity studies drawings and prints based on selected artist model(s) Use drawing and printmaking materials, processes and techniques with understanding and clarity of purpose The student is able to: Generate, develop and clarify ideas in a related series of Identity studies drawings and prints based on selected artist model(s) Use drawing and printmaking materials, processes and techniques with understanding The student is able to: Generate and develop ideas in a related series of Identity studies drawings and prints based on selected artist model(s) Uses drawing and printmaking materials, processes and techniques appropriate to purpose Task 1: 1 x A3 page personal research 2 x A4 Artist research 1 x A3 Artist comparison Task 2: 6 x A6 developmental ‘Identity’ studies and 4 x A5 drawings for prints Task 3: 1 x A5 working print (monoprint) Task 4: 1 x A4 print (black on white) At least 4 single colour prints A4 and 1 x A4 multi-colour print Achievement with Excellence Achievement with Merit Achievement Evidence

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